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Nick Cannon and Bre Tiesi's newborn son, Legendary, needed respiratory support after he was delivered by a midwife during a natural home birth this week.

The baby boy is Bre's first child and Nick's 8th by five women.

After announcing his birth on Instagram, Bre, 31, revealed that the home birth was documented in a new vlog on YouTube on Monday.

Bre explained in the caption that "baby had a long crown caused by a nuchal hand (hand up by ear), so he needed a little respiratory support" from her midwife.

"I noticed he wasn't crying," she wrote.

Bre is seen nervously cradling the newborn before a piercing cry escapes from his lungs. "Finally baby cried," she said. "Best sound I ever heard."

"This was the most limit pushing/painful moment yet completely empowering and beautiful," Bre wrote at the conclusion of the vlog. "The intensity of birth takes over your whole body. I swear I was pushing so hard, screaming and crying I started to break, I started doubting I could do it. I kept saying, 'Why won't he come? Get him out.'"

"At a certain point, I had left my body," she adds. "I didn't remember a lot of my birth until my team sat with me to process my birth, which I felt was sooo healing and helpful," she continued. "I can't thank them enough and my amazing partner who showed the f* up for us. We love you so much."

A worn out Nick is seen by her side. He looks like he hasn't slept in days. In one photo, Nick cut Legendary's umbilical cord.

Bre captioned the photo gallery:

"I did it. An all natural unmedicated home birth. This was the most humbling / limit pushing yet awakening and completely empowering experience. I can't thank my team enough for delivering my son safely. This experience has changed me forever and I couldn't of asked for a more amazing and supportive partner. Daddy showed the f up for us.. I couldn't of done it without you. I can't believe he's here."

Watch the video below.
 

ShotbyNYP / BACKGRID

Bre Tiesi gave birth to Nick Cannon's 8th child, a boy, Eurweb.com reported. Bre announced the natural home birth in a series of photos on her Instagram page on Monday.

One photo shows the exhausted 31-year-old model holding her newborn son while Nick cut his umbilical cord.

She captioned the photo gallery:

"I did it. An all natural unmedicated home birth. This was the most humbling / limit pushing yet awakening and completely empowering experience. I can't thank my team enough for delivering my son safely. This experience has changed me forever and I couldn't of asked for a more amazing and supportive partner. Daddy showed the f up for us.. I couldn't of done it without you. I can't believe he's here."

Bre also documented the childbirth process in a YouTube video.

She wrote:

"I have documented my pregnancy, natural induction, labor, delivery as well as more information and resources for doulas midwife's and hypno birthing. It's Real RAW and I hope It helps anyone considering an unmedicated home birth."

The baby is Bre's first. Nick confirmed he is expecting three more babies in 2022.

Bre married former NFL star Johnny Manziel in 2018 but they separated in 2019.

Watch the video below.
 

Rich Polk/Getty Images

A recent study shows Black women are at higher risk of dying from pregnancy-related causes than white or Asian women.

Black women are more at risk for gestational diabetes, hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders, and they are three times as likely to die during pregnancy than their white counterparts.

Black women are sharing their stories of perfectly healthy pregnancies experiencing traumatic births and, in the worst cases, ending tragically with death of the parent or the baby.

Actress and advocate Tatyana Ali, shared her own deeply traumatic and life-threatening birth at the BlogHer Health 2021 event in January.

She closed out BlogHer Health 2021 in conversation with Sugaberry Founder Thai Randolph about the birth inequality crisis.

"I lived a very privileged life," Ali said, citing her background as a Harvard-educated former child actor. "The birth of my son and my pregnancy was really my first interaction with a type of racism that could kill me and affect the health of my child."

The 42-year-old actress said her privilege didn't protect her from the systemic racism in the medical community.

She detailed the traumatic moments from her first birthing story — experiences of being ignored, coerced and traumatized at such a vulnerable moment that resulted in an emergency C-section and her newborn spending the first few days of his life in the NICU.

"When we left the hospital it felt like we were running," Ali said.

It wasn't until she was really able to connect and talk with people in the reproductive justice space — in her case, a lactation consultant — that she says it fully clicked how valid her feelings of trauma and violation were.

"When we were healing our wounds the best we could, not even knowing our story fit neatly in the statistics, a lactation consultant asked what happened," Ali said. "When I told her, the look on her face let me know that what I was feeling was real — and that something needlessly horrible had happened."

Ali started to connect with other organizations in the reproductive justice space — like Black Mamas Matter — and she said "the paradigm shift started to take place."

"The guilt is something I carried with me for a very long time, until I started to hear similar stories and realized there's something bigger happening," Ali said. "That my story is one piece of it. And it didn’t have to be that way."

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

For her second pregnancy, Ali said, "I wanted a black midwife who I felt connected to. [Finding her] was not easy to do and there are historical reasons for that and there are corrections for that too."

"At my [male] OBGYN I had a pelvic exam every time, he was always in it," she said. "My midwife asked me 'can I touch you? can I touch your belly?' She always asked. If I didn't need a pelvic exam, she didn’t give me a pelvic exam."

And this second birth? It was exactly the experience she wanted and needed: "My second birth, for both my husband and I, it completely changed, it cleared up the trauma."

To other women who are scared about their pregnancies or processing their own trauma from birth inequality, Ali urges them to feel empowered to take charge of their and to reclaim the joy of giving birth and being a new parent.

"Share your story, share it, share it, do not stop digging. You can have the type of birth that you want, the kind of support that you want. We are often talked about as a needy community, that we have more needs than anyone else. Any mother of any ethnicity knows, we need community, we need support, we need help when things go wrong. Unfortunately our systems are such that some people get those needs met and some don't. Remember that and let that empower you to get what you need."