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A Minneapolis judge has delayed the start of the trial for former police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

The murder trial, which was set to begin Monday, will start on Tuesday morning with the selection of jurors, according to MSN.com.

Judge Peter Cahill of the Hennepin County district court delayed the trial to mull over whether to reinstate the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin.

But, according to ABC News, Judge Cahill said he does not have jurisdiction to rule on whether the third-degree murder charge should be reinstated.

Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Floyd during a traffic stop in May 2020.

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A viral video that showed Chauvin pressing his knee into Floyd's neck as he took his last breath sparked weeks of rioting, looting and unrest in Minneapolis and other Democratic stronghold states.

Black Lives Matter has been protesting outside the courthouse for days.

Minneapolis and Hennepin County officials spent at least $1 million erecting fences topped with barbed wire and other barricades around the courthouse and City Hall buildings.

BLM is calling for the quick conviction of Chauvin. One speaker led BLM in chants: "The whole world is watching!"

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The Minnesota Freedom Fund revealed it used only $200,000 out of $35 million in donations to bail out protesters during the civil unrest following the murder of George Floyd.

The unrest has resulted in millions of dollars in donations to help those arrested. But many say they have not seen an accounting of the money from any bail fund organization.

The MFF is a small, volunteer community fund based in Minneapolis -- the city where Floyd was killed by a former Minneapolis cop.

In the last few weeks, the MFF has been hashtagged in posts on Instagram and Twitter, asking for donations to bail out protesters.

But in the last week, donors -- particularly major corporations -- have been asking for an accounting of where the money went -- since many of those arrested are still sitting in jails.

One Twitter user, Evelyn Woodsen, founder of The Affinity Mag, tweeted, "Wait till Twitter wakes up tomorrow and finds out the Minnesota Bail Fund got $35 million and only used $200k to bail out protestors."

After calls for transparency and accountability, the MFF finally acknowledged it was overwhelmed with donations and struggling to figure out what to do with the money.

"We are a volunteer community fund who until last month was doing all we could to pay a handful of misdemeanors each month, steadily paying, getting funds back, raising more $ when we could, doing it again," they wrote.

They removed their "donate" button and tried to redirect funds to other organizations with bail-out initiatives. But donations kept pouring in.

A lawyer contacted by Refinery29 explained the organization's dilemma:

"We were a small organization that was not ready for this kind of influx and so we're working as quickly as possible while being mindful that we have to take slow, necessary steps and have conversations with the group about hiring an accountant and attorney who can help us go through these processes," Mirella Ceja-Orozco, the Immigration Attorney Volunteer on the Board of Minnesota Freedom Fund, told Refinery29. "Before, we were an organization that had two staff members and maybe 8 volunteers and that's completely changing now."

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Minneapolis City Council president Lisa Bender defended the City Council's decision to dismantle the police department in the aftermath of the murder of a 46-year-old Black man in police custody.

On Sunday, nine City Council members vowed to dismantle the police force "and try something new."

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On Monday Bender spoke via Skype with CNN's Alisyn Camerota, saying the "revolutionary" movement to remove the police department is a "wake up call" that the police "is not keeping every member of our community safe."

"What if in the middle of the night, my home is broken into?" Camerota asked Bender.

"That comes from a place of privilege," Bender replied.

"Because for those of us for whom the system is working, I think we need to step back and imagine what it would feel like to already live in that reality where calling the police may mean more harm is done," she said.

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Bender said the City Council is looking to shift the response away from armed police officers to community policing by trained residents.

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The City Council will face opposition from Mayor Jacob Frey, who has said he will not allow the police force to be dismantled.

"We are not starting from scratch we have invested in community-based safety strategies," Bender said. "We've done an analysis of all the reasons people call 911 and have looked at ways we can shift the response away from police officers into a more appropriate response for mental health calls. So the groundwork is laid already in Minneapolis for us to work from that," she said.

"Now the hard work begins for us to rebuild systems that really work to keep everyone in our community safe," Bender said.

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The Minneapolis City Council is holding an emergency meeting to "dismantle the Minneapolis Police Department and replace it with a transformative new model of public safety."

The emergency meeting comes after nearly 2 weeks of civil unrest and looting in south Minneapolis and surrounding areas in response to the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died in Minneapolis police custody.

Four police officers are in jail awaiting trial on murder charges in connection with Floyd's death.

On Thursday, City Council member Jeremiah Ellison tweeted: "We are going to dismantle the Minneapolis Police Department. And when we're done, we're not simply gonna glue it back together. We are going to dramatically rethink how we approach public safety and emergency response. It's really past due."

City Council member Lisa Bender added: "Yes. We are going to dismantle the Minneapolis Police Department and replace it with a transformative new model of public safety."

The emergency meeting began at 12:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5. City Council members are set to vote on immediate changes to the police force including removing the police force and replacing it with a community-based, non-violent neighborhood watch group.

The City Council on Friday voted to ban police choke holds. Police officers are required to intervene when they observe inappropriate use of force being used on a suspect.

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The former Minneapolis police officer who killed George Floyd by kneeling on his neck for nearly 9 minutes has been arrested, according to multiple reports.

Authorities confirm Derek Chauvin is in police custody. The arrest comes after south Minneapolis was rocked by violent protests, rioting, and looting for 3 days.

"Why did it take so long? How is it not clearly criminal conduct from the video that we all watched, said Guy Benson, host of Guy Benson Radio Show, in an appearance on Fox News.

Social media celebrated the news that Chauvin was finally in police custody on Friday.

"Derek Chauvin has been taken into custody!! Thank you Jesus!!! Justice is being served!!! #JusticeForGeorge," one user tweeted.

In an open letter shared on Twitter Friday morning, the former president spoke of the frustrations expressed in conversations he had about Floyd's death.

He noted that incidents of police brutality cannot be allowed to be regarded as a normal part of daily life.

"This shouldn't be 'normal' in 2020 America. It can't be 'normal.' If we want our children to grow up in a nation that lives up to its highest ideals, we can and must do better."

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George Floyd and the ex-Minneapolis police officer who killed him may have known each other, according to a report by KSTP.com.

The former owner of a south Minneapolis nightclub says ex-cop George Floyd and Derek Chauvin worked overlapping shifts as security at her club until the end of last year.

"Chauvin was our off-duty police for almost the entirety of the 17 years that we were open," said Maya Santamaria, former owner of El Nuevo Rodeo club on Lake Street.

She wasn't sure if the two men knew each other. "They were working together at the same time, it's just that Chauvin worked outside and the security guards were inside."

Santamaria said she sold the club a few months ago. Santamaria was among millions worldwide who viewed the horrific video that showed Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck until he died.

"I didn't recognize George as one of our security guys because he looked really different lying there like that," she said.

She also didn't recognize Chauvin at first. "My friend sent me (the video) and said this is your guy who used to work for you and I said, 'It's not him.' And then they did the closeup and that's when I said, 'Oh my God, that's him,'"

Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers fired from the police force a day after Floyd's death. Chauvin responded to a 911 call of a "forgery in process" on Monday - along with ex-cops Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J Alexander Kueng.

Violent protests continued for the 3rd night in south Minneapolis.

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Minnesota state police arrested a CNN reporter and his cameraman as they covered the continuing protests over the death of George Floyd in south Minneapolis.

The police cited CNN contributor Omar Jimenez with a misdemeanor for refusing to stop his coverage of the civil unrest on Thursday.

Police allowed Jimenez and his cameraman to finish his report before placing the camera on the ground and arresting the journalists.

Fellow journalists and CNN colleagues vented their outrage on Twitter, saying the arrests violated the reporter's freedom of speech rights.

"Arresting journalists is regime behavior. Please know that, Minnesota. #GeorgeFloyd," tweeted MSBNC corespondent Joy Reid.

Jimenez, a graduate of attended Northwestern University, is a Hispanic who grew up in Kennesaw, Georgia. He received his journalism degree in 2015.

Update: Minnesota Governor Tim Walz apologized the arrests of the reporters.

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President Donald Trump sparked an uproar with late-night tweets about the continuing protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Minneapolis burned for the 3rd straight night as hundreds of people protested the murder of the 46-year-old Black man by a white police officer.

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Demonstrators and "outside agitators" looted stores and set cars and buildings on fire. A pawn shop down the street from the Minneapolis police 3rd precinct burned to the ground. The abandoned police precinct was also set on fire, as hundreds of demonstrators cheered.

The Minneapolis Fire Department responded to more than 15 different structure fires resulting from the protests on Thursday night and early Friday.

The mayor called in the National Guard on Wednesday, but President Trump wasn't satisfied with the city's response to the looting and mayhem.

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Trump threatened to send in more National Guard units and "get the job done right."

"I can't stand back & watch this happen to a great American City, Minneapolis," he tweeted just before 1 a.m. Friday.

"A total lack of leadership. Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right....."

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Trump angered Twitter users by referring to the mostly white looters and vandals as "THUGS." He tweeted, "When the looting starts, the shooting starts."

"These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen. Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!"

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The White House claims Trump was referring to shooting looters with rubber bullets, not real ammunition.

In response to the backlash, Twitter censored Trump's tweet, placing it behind a warning label.

According to Twitter, Trump's tweet "violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence. However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the Tweet to remain accessible.”

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Outraged Twitter users assumed Trump was referring to Black people as "thugs." Even though the majority of protesters have been whites, the looting and vandalism is being blamed on Black people.

Twitter activists complain that property owners and police officers are destroying properties to file insurance claims during the coronavirus lockdown.

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Hennepin County prosecutor Michael Freeman says there is currently no evidence to bring charges against one of the four officers involved in George Floyd's death.

Freeman responded to a question from a reporter asking why there are no charges against Derek Chauvin, the cop who was directly involved in Floyd's death.

Freeman said the video is "graphic and horrific and terrible," but "there is other evidence that does not support a criminal charge."

"My business is 'is it criminal?' and that's what we have to prove," he said

Freeman said his office will not rush to justice but they will "wade through" the evidence before charges can be brought.

U.S Attorney Erica McDonald said police are given "wide latitude" to use "a certain amount of force" and she is trying to determine if excessive force was used in this case.

All four officers were fired on Tuesday, a day after Floyd died.

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City of MS, Facebook

A mayor in Mississippi sparked outrage when he tweeted an insensitive comment about George Floyd, the Black man who was killed in police custody.

Floyd, 46, died from asphyxia when ex-cop Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly 8 minutes. Floyd died at the scene on Monday, May 25.

Hal Marx, the mayor of Petal, MS, said Floyd's trachea was not obstructed by the officer's knee, because when Floyd said he couldn't breathe, that proved he was breathing.

Marx made the comment on Twitter on Wednesday.

"I didn't see anything unreasonable. If you can say you can't breathe, you're breathing," Marx tweeted. Marx added, "Most likely that man died of overdose or heart attack. Video doesn't show his resistance that got him in that position. Police being crucified."

Following the backlash, Marx tried to clear up what he wrote, saying his tweet was "misinterpreted," and no one knows for sure how Floyd died.

"I think that people are so quick to judge the police before they have all the facts," he told the Hattiesburg American.

"I can't say whether a crime was committed or whether they did anything right or wrong, all I'm saying is don't rush to judgment based on what you see in that video."

Clarence Magee, president of the Forrest County NAACP, said the mayor's comment was uncalled for. "To hear that statement made by a mayor or anybody is very troubling," he said.

The tweet has since been deleted.