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Celebrity attorney Precious Anderson knows her clients want quick, painless solutions for their small to mid-sized business problems. The Anderson Firm can assist you with business, entertainment, family, estate planning, or personal matters.
 

Prenuptial Agreements — What Can They Actually Do in Georgia?

by The Anderson Firm, LLC

As with so many other things in society, millennials are rewriting the rules. With a more equitable workforce (in terms of gender), marrying later in life, and a desire to hold onto hard-earned assets, prenuptial agreements are as popular as ever. It seems fiancés are discovering that prenuptial agreements are useful for more than just the ultra-wealthy.

Functions of Prenuptial Agreements in Georgia

The most widely understood utility of prenuptial agreements is the ability for independently wealthy spouses to keep many of their assets after a divorce. Separate property, which is property owned by spouses before marriage, could become marital property through commingling...

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The Anderson Firm is committed to our clients and goes the extra mile to understand their situations in order to provide premium legal services. Reach out to us soon to book your consultation.

By Appointment Only
+1 (404) 521-1111
hello@theandersonfirm.com

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theAndersonFirm.com

Celebrity attorney Precious Anderson knows her clients want quick, painless solutions for their small to mid-sized business problems. The Anderson Firm can assist you with business, entertainment, family, estate planning, or personal matters.
 

Georgia Parents: Not Getting Child Support Like You Should?

by The Anderson Firm, LLC

The concept is simple: both parents should financially contribute, from each's ability, to a child's needs. In many circumstances — after a divorce, or separation of unmarried parents — a legal order needs to be established that ensures the financial security of a particular child or children.

Just because an order for child support is in place does not mean the paying parent will automatically comply. If you are the receiving spouse in a child support order and stop receiving payments from your ex, you have options for getting the money your child needs. Remember: you shouldn’t feel guilty for putting your foot down and demanding payments to which you and your child are legally entitled. Unpaid child support is referred to in the legal system as "child support arrears."

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Celebrity attorney Precious Anderson knows her clients want quick, painless solutions for their small to mid-sized business problems. The Anderson Firm can assist you with business, entertainment, family, estate planning, or personal matters.
 

Laying Out the Steps in a Georgia Divorce

by The Anderson Firm, LLC

The unexpected is what makes divorce stressful for many spouses. If you're about to file for divorce, you probably want to know how much it will cost, how long it will take, and what the process actually looks like.

Before filing for divorce in Georgia, you must have lived in the state for a minimum of six months. You may then file for divorce on the grounds that you and your spouse have "irreconcilable differences", which is no-fault divorce, or on fault-based grounds (there are around a dozen fault grounds in Georgia). Your attorney will be able to advise you on the advantages and disadvantages for no-fault and fault-based filings.

NOTE: The process outlined below applies to divorces in which spouses do not agree on the terms of the divorce settlement — this is referred to as a "contested" divorce. If you have an uncontested divorce, your process might look quite different. Your attorney will be able to go into further detail.

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By Appointment Only
+1 (404) 521-1111
hello@theandersonfirm.com

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theAndersonFirm.com

Celebrity attorney Precious Anderson knows her clients want quick, painless solutions for their small to mid-sized business problems. The Anderson Firm can assist you with business, entertainment, family, estate planning, or personal matters.

In this blog post, we discuss whether or not you need a will or trust for your estate plan. We also highlight if you can (and should) file for divorce by yourself.
 

Why Do I Need a Living Trust Or Will?

Living trusts and wills share a few characteristics, but they are two distinct estate planning tools. Many individuals have preconceived notions that trusts are only for the rich and famous, but every single person needs a will.

The Anderson Law Firm blog lays out the key differences between these estate planning documents so you might come away with a better understanding of each.
 
Similarities Between a Will and a Trust

Both wills and trusts can distribute assets of the estate planner. The creator of a will is known as a testator, while a trust's creator is referred to as a grantor. Read more
 
What a Will Can Do that a Trust Cannot Do:

If you have minor children, you are able to name a guardian for your kids in the event something happens to both parents. Read more
 
What a Trust Can Do that a Will Cannot Do:

Assets in a living trust do not have to pass through probate court after the grantor becomes incapacitated or passes away. Read more
 
Conclusion

While the benefits of both wills and living trusts are numerous, there is plenty we did not cover in this blog. For example, many estate planners choose to use both wills and living trusts in tandem to meet their goals. You need to consult with an experienced and knowledgeable attorney to determine which estate planning documents you need.

The Anderson Firm is committed to our clients and goes the extra mile to understand their situations in order to provide premium legal services. Reach out to us soon to book your consultation.

By Appointment Only
+1 (404) 521-1111
hello@theandersonfirm.com

Comments Off on Fulton County Commissioner Marvin Arrington, Jr. accused of influencing judge to hold bond hearing for client while courthouse was closed during Coronavirus outbreak

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Screen grab: Fox5 Atlanta

Fulton County Commissioner Marvin S. Arrington, Jr. is accused of using his political influence with the courts to schedule a bond hearing for his client on a day when the courthouse was closed during the Coronavirus outbreak in Atlanta.

Atlanta attorney Precious Anderson only found out about her ex-husband Kashka Scott's bond hearing when she searched the court database for hearings so she wouldn't get any surprises.

She was stunned to learn Scott's hearing was taking place on a day when the courthouse was officially closed during the virus outbreak. Anderson received no official notice of the hearing.

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Screen grab: Fox5 Atlanta

Scott (pictured right) spent 6 days in jail on a charge of strangling another woman, according to Fox5 Atlanta News. Anderson was in the courtroom to watch her ex-husband's bond hearing unfold earlier this week.

Anderson wanted to be in attendance at the hearing because she is dealing with Mr. Scott on a variety of domestic and legal issues.

Child Protective Services opened 2 investigations into Scott in the last three weeks after receiving two separate complaints of child abuse from mandatory reporters.

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Screen grab: Fox5 Atlanta

Anderson couldn't understand why -- with the courthouse shut down and no bond motion filed -- Scott was transported from jail and brought into court.

Anderson told Fox5 I-Team reporter Dale Russell why she believes Scott received preferential treatment over the other jailed detainees who don't have high profile attorneys.

"For him to have a hearing here today is just unbelievable, except for the fact of who represents him," she said, referring to Fulton County Commissioner Arrington.

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Screen grab: Fox5 Atlanta

Arrington admitted he filed an "emergency bond motion" to get a hearing for Scott a half hour after the hearing was scheduled to begin.

Russell searched the court dockets and couldn't find a motion for an emergency bond hearing for Scott. Russell asked Arrington directly if he reached out to the judge personally to request a bond hearing.

Surprisingly, Arrington admitted that he did indeed reach out to the judge in her chambers.

"Uh, yes. I mean, that is something typical that attorneys will do," Arrington told Russell.

Arrington said Scott was concerned that he was locked up in a jail that wasn't adequately screening inmates for the virus.

Assistant District Attorney Adam Abbate told the judge he felt "blindsided" by the bond hearing. He argued that he received no advanced notice of a bond hearing and he had "no time" to review Scott's criminal history or prepare for the hearing.

So Abbate asked for a sky high bond of $150,000 for Scott based on his history of allegedly beating women and children.

Fulton County Superior Court Judge Rachel Krause admitted the surprise bond hearing was a "strange procedure" during an unusual time.

She said she cancelled an earlier hearing because of fears of a "packed courthouse" during the Coronavirus outbreak in Atlanta.

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Judge Krause said Scott was eligible for a $20,000 bond despite the domestic charges against him. She ordered Scott to make no contact with the woman he strangled or his three children by Anderson. "When I say no contact, I mean no contact," she told Scott.

Anderson, who owns The Anderson Firm, a boutique law firm in Atlanta, says she wished she had more time to prepare for the hearing.

"I'm a member of the bar. I believe in justice, and this is not [justice]," she told Russell.

"This is made for TV. It is made for TV," Anderson said.