Robert Kamau/GC Images

Jay Z is using his substantial influence to reform the criminal justice system for rappers who go on trial in New York.

The 51-year-old rap mogul has joined forces with other rap activists to end the unfair practice of using harmful lyrics against rappers in court.

manley099 via Getty Images

Rappers typically glorify murder, violence, drug dealing, prostitution and burglary in their rap lyrics. But most of them don't live that life when they leave the recording studios.

According to Rolling Stone, Jay Z, government name Shawn Carter, has teamed up with Meek Mill, Big Sean, Fat Joe, Robin Thicke, Kelly Rowland, and Yo Gotti to urge lawmakers to sign and support the "Rap Music on Trial" bill.

The rappers argue that rather than acknowledge rap music as a form of artistic expression, police and prosecutors interpret rap lyrics literally. They say the tactic gives prosecutors "a dangerous advantage in the courtroom."

Jon Super/Redferns

"This is an issue that's important to [Jay-Z] and all the other artists that have come together to try to bring about this change," Alex Spiro, Jay-Z's lawyer, told Rolling Stone. "This is a long time coming. Mr. Carter is from New York, and if he can lend his name and his weight, that's what he wants to do."

Rolling Stone reports the bill passed through the New York Senate Codes Committee on Tuesday. The bill is headed to a full vote on the Senate floor.

Barry Brecheisen/Wireimage

Stevie Wonder says he's moving to Ghana permanently to protect his grandsons and great grandsons from racial injustice.

The 25-time Grammy-winner revealed his upcoming move to West Africa during a recent interview with Oprah Winfrey, according to PEOPLE.

"I wanna see this nation smile again. And I want to see it before I leave to travel to move to Ghana, because I'm going to do that," he said.

When asked if he plans to relocate to Ghana permanently, the 70-year-old musician replied, "I am, because I don't want to see my children's children's children have to say, 'Oh, please like me. Please respect me. Please know that I am important. Please value me.' What kinda [life is that]?"

Wonder has been considering a permanent move to Ghana since 1994, per the Orlando Sentinel. He told a Washington gathering of the International Association of African American Music that he had fallen in love with the country and "there's more of a sense of community there."

He didn't say when he will depart America for good.

FayesVision/WENN.com

Singer Akon is encouraging Black Americans to "let go of the past" and move on from the brutal history of slavery.

The 47-year-old Senegalese star insists his fellow Africans have "overcome" their past and the cruelty their ancestors faced as slave traders ripped families apart.

"We've kind of overcome the thought of slavery, we don't even think about it," Akon said during a new interview with VladTV.

"The only time we think about it, honestly, is when we're doing tours at Goree Island. Outside of that, people have lived and moved way beyond the slavery concept."

Goree is a tiny island off the main harbor of Dakar, Senegal, a pivotal destination for slave trading from the 15th to 19th centuries.

Isaiah Trickey/FilmMagic

Akon believes American Blacks could benefit by "letting go" of slavery, because it's such a large weight to carry. He said Black people will never make progress until they let go of the past.

"I think it's the art of just letting the past go and moving towards the future. I think, in the U.S., they have this stigma of just not letting go of the past and blaming the past on every mishap or, you know, disappointment. I think as long as you hold onto that past, there's a lot of weight that you carry with you everywhere you go. It's hard to move forward and move fast when you've got a weight on your back. You just gotta let it go."

WENN.com

The "Smack That" singer urges "brainwashed" Black Americans to travel to Africa, where they'll be accepted.

"Do you want to stay here (in America) and continue to be treated this way or just go back home, where you're no longer the minority. You actually are the majority, and you control your destiny, your future, and your land... They just need to go... America did a good job at brainwashing (them). The moment you mention Africa, they start shaking. They don't even know why."

Watch Akon's interview below.