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Sha'Carri Richardson's ex-girlfriend, Janeek Brown admits abusing the Olympic track star.

Sha'Carri shared her abusive relationship with the Jamaican hurdler in an Instagram post.

The 22-year-old Olympic sprinter said she's healing emotionally from the emotional trauma, including homophobia, that she experienced in her relationship with Janeek.

Sha'Carri wrote about her emotional pain in a social media post.

"I was in a relationship with a Jamaican athlete that never cared about me from jump," she wrote.

"I was abused and stole from yet protected her from the judgment of her country & family while they dragged me. I had to deal with homophobic [sic] and so much more that I'm still healing from."

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AFP via Getty Images

Sha'Carri and Janeek dated for at least a year before their bitter breakup. Janeek (left) is pictured comforting teammate Megan Tapper in October 2019.

The Kingston, Jamaica native took to Instagram to deny the allegations as "complete lies."

Janeek directed a message to Sha'Carri in her native patois, warning her not to take her kindness for weakness.

"Don't take mi bomboclaath kindness fi weakness," she wrote. "Pay mi fi mi bomboclaath ting if yuh ago tek it, give mi a likkle portion." Translation: "Pay me for my [expletive] thing if you're going to take it, give me a small portion."

But in an interview, Janeek confirmed she abused Sha'Carri.

"I was abusive once that there's physical evidence of," she said. "And we moved on, and even after then I was trying to move on from that, we still got nowhere."

"Yeah, I was going through something - I was finding myself, that's why I am coming to social media, you feel me?" she said. "So yeah, it's a transformation; I'm going to find myself now. I may look different now."

Janeek, who is working through her mommy issues, said her mother pushed her into being a track & field star. She said she is done with track & field.

As for her love life, Janeek said she is working on finding herself, and if God sends her another woman, she won't make the same mistakes she made with Sha'Carri.
 




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Sha'Carri Richardson is "healing" after breaking up with a female hurdler from Jamaica.

The 22-year-old Olympic sprinter says she's healing emotionally from trauma, including homophobia, that she experienced in her relationship with the unnamed Jamaican athlete.

Sha'Carri wrote about her emotional pain in a social media post.

"I was in a relationship with a Jamaican athlete that never cared about me from jump," she wrote.

"I was abused and stole from yet protected her from the judgment of her country & family while they dragged me. I had to deal with homophobic [sic] and so much more that I'm still healing from."

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Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images

After her victory in the U.S. Olympic trials last year, Sha'Carri credited her then-girlfriend with helping pick her hair color.

"She said it just spoke to her, the fact that it was just so loud and vibrant," Richardson told USA Today.

"She felt like [orange] was loud and encouraging and, honestly, dangerous... That's who I am. She just wanted me to be able to make a statement — let's continue to show the world I'm a force to be reckoned with."

Richardson also posted a rainbow emoji on her Twitter feed, which prompted a plethora of rainbow tweets in her Twitter timeline.

Sha'Carri, who was raised by her grandmother, was estranged from her biological mother, who died in June of last year.

Jamaicans are notoriously anti-homosexual and LGBT+ individuals are routinely beaten or jailed if caught in the act.

For that reason, Sandrarose.com won't reveal the name of Sha'Carri's abusive ex lover.




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Kamila Valieva of Team Russia made several costly errors during the women's Free Skating event at the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympic Games in China on Wednesday.

The 15-year-old was favored to win the gold medal in women's figure skating, but her "uncharacteristic" mistakes left her in fourth place. Beijing Olympics officials had said they would not hold a medal ceremony if she came in 1st through 3rd place.

AFP via Getty Images

The visibly distraught teen buried her face in her hands and sobbed uncontrollably while being consoled by "Kiss & Cry" officials.

Her Russian teammate Anna Shcherbakova won the gold in the free skating event.

Russian teammate Alexandra Trusova and Japan's Kaori Sakamoto (who won silver and bronze, respectively) both cried, while Shcherbakova stood alone for several minutes, unsure of what to do.
 
RELATED: Sha’Carri Richardson says 'only difference' between her and Kamila Valieva is skin color
 
Valieva made headlines after she tested positive for the banned heart medicine trimetazidine.

Trimetazidine is an anti-angina medication that is prescribed for chest pain caused by lack of blood flow and oxygen to the heart.

The drug is banned because it gives athletes an advantage by elevating the heart rate, thus increasing blood flow and oxygen to the heart muscle.

Valieva claimed the banned drug got into her system when she drank from the same cup as her grandfather, who was prescribed the medication.

However, medical experts told PEOPLE that it was "highly unlikely" that the tiny amount of medication on her grandfather's lips would be enough to get into her system and be detected by sensitive lab equipment.

Despite testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug, Valieva was allowed to compete in the Beijing Olympics.

The Court of Arbitration for sport, which cleared Valieva to compete, said preventing the teen from competing "would cause her irreparable harm" due to her age.

Taylor Hill/WireImage

But American track star Sha'Carri Richardson was unsympathetic. Richardson tested positive for marijuana use and was banned from competing at the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo (held in 2021 due to the pandemic).

Richardson, who is Black, claimed a double standard and suggested the only difference in their cases was the color of her skin.

However, Mark Adams, the spokesman for the International Olympic Committee, insisted the two cases are very different.

"Every single case is very different. [Richardson] tested positive on June 19 (2021), quite a way ahead of the Tokyo Games," Adams said. "Ms Richardson accepted a one month period of ineligibility which began on June 28. I would suggest that there isn't a great deal of similarity between the two cases," he added.

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Olympic track star Sha'Carri Richardson famously failed a drug test prior to the Olympics in 2020, and was not allowed to compete.

Richardson, 21, was favored to win a gold medal in the women's 100 meters at the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo and had blown away her competition at the U.S. Olympic trials.

But her dreams of Olympic gold ended after she tested positive for cannabis.

Meanwhile, 15-year-old Kamila Valieva, a Russian who is favored to take home the gold medal in figure skating, was cleared to compete at the Beijing Olympics in China after she tested positive for the banned heart medication Trimetazidine.

Trimetazidine, an anti-angina medication that is prescribed for chest pain, is banned because it improves performance by increasing the heart rate. The International Olympic Committee ruled the banned drug gives athletes an unfair edge over their competition.

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Richardson noted the similarities between herself and Valieva — and that only one of them was cleared to compete.

"The only difference I see is I'm a black young lady," she tweeted on Monday.
 

The Court of Arbitration for Sport, which cleared Valieva to compete, said the teen's age was one of the factors in its decision and that banning her "would cause her irreparable harm."

Richardson and other American athletes were unsympathetic to Valieva's plight.

"You have athletes that are competing under two different systems, and we saw that today," tweeted former figure skater Ashley Wagner. "THAT is not fair, raise the age minimum so we can all play on the same terms. This is not the call," continued Wagner, who won a bronze medal with the U.S. team in 2014.

AFP via Getty Images

Sha'Carri Richardson was nearly canceled this week when she chose violence in her ongoing beef with Jamaican Olympic sprinters.

It all started when the 21-year-old sprinter "liked" a tweet dissing Jamaican silver medalist Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce who came in second at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon in August.

When asked if she saw Richardson during the race, Fraser Pryce said, "I wasn't watching Sha'Carri, to be honest."

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As a reminder, Richardson finished dead last in that race.

After the race, Fraser Pryce tweeted: "Shorty in the back look Lil Wayne," referring to Richardson.

Then, Richardson "liked" a post that was disrespectful to Jamaicans. The post read:

"Not y'all Jamaicans still talking shit when y'all gotta walk barefoot to your coconut stand everyday for a living."

Richardson and the Jamaican athletes shared more insults on Twitter.com.

Then the American sprinter who was banned from Olympic competition for smoking weed shared a post with the word "Violence" with the toggle on.

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"Oh you're choosing violence now?" wrote one Twitter follower. Others let Richardson know that her attitude was unbecoming of an American athlete.

Another Twitter user wrote:

"Should've chosen violence on that track sis! It’s too late neowwww."

A third Twitter follower said the Jamaican ladies were eating jerk chicken and dancing by the time Richardson reached the finish line.

"They had time to make jerk chicken & start dutty wining to a dancehall track by the time you got to the finish line. The only violence is how you lost. You gotta stop. 'This is very em-bear-rah-zing! Are you not em-bear-rahz-ed?'"

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Allyson Felix wants fans to "rally around" embattled sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson after her spectacular fail at a recent track meet.

The Olympic gold medal track & field star showed support for Richardson after she finished dead last at the Prefontaine Classic 100 meter dash in Eugene, Oregon on Saturday.

Social media users dragged the 21-year-old sprinter, and rapper Nicki Minaj posted a meme of a broom.

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Felix, 35, asked fans to rally around Richardson who lost her estranged mom before the Olympic trials in June.

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Felix told Jimmy Kimmel Live! guest host Stephen A. Smith:

"I know that she's obviously been through so much and I hope that she's just supported. I hope people rally around her. I think just more than anything, for all athletes, there's so much that goes into it. We just, you know, give her the support that she needs."

 

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Sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson finished dead last in the 100 meter dash at the Wanda Diamond League Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon on Saturday.

Sha'Carri, who was banned from the 2020 Tokyo Olympics for smoking pot, finished 9th in the field during the "dream race" against Jamaica's 3 best sprinters.

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Jamaica's Elaine Thompson-Herah, who won a gold medal at the Olympics, ran the 100 meter dash in 10.54 seconds, the best time in the world this year.

Jamaicans Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Sherika Jackson followed close behind Thompson-Herah in the same 1-2-3 finish as the Olympics.

The Prefontaine Classic was billed as Sha'Carri's redemption race after she missed out on a medal at the Olympic Games. She debuted a long, blonde flaxen lacefront wig and 2-inch gel nails for the race.

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Afterwards, she defended her last place finish, saying she's not done yet.

"This is one race. I'm not done. You know what I'm capable of. Count me out if you want to. Talk all the sh*t you want. Because I'm here to stay. I'm not done. I'm the sixth fastest woman in this game ever. Can't nobody ever take that from me!"

Sha'Carri opted not to run in the 200 meters after her disappointing finish in the 100 meters.

After her spectacular loss, social media lit up with memes and taunts mocking her for being arrogant before and after the race.

Rapper Nicki Minaj shaded Sha'Carri by posting a meme of a broom on her Instagram Story.

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Kanye West previews a snippet of his single "No Child Left Behind" in a Beats By Dre commercial featuring sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson.

The 21-year-old Team USA athlete was banned from the Tokyo Olympics squad after testing positive for marijuana use last month. She is seen preparing to run a 100 meter dash while Kanye sings:

    "Back again, I used my back against the wall
    Never called on y'all, Never count on y'all
    Always count on God
    He's done miracles on me
    He's done miracles on me..."

Kanye used the commercial to announce his highly-anticipated album Donda set to release on Friday, July 23.

The trailer aired during Game 6 of the NBA Finals, where the Milwaukee Bucks defeated the Phoenix Suns 105-98 to win its first ever NBA championship.

IXOLA / BACKGRID

Kanye shared the video on his Instagram page - one of only two posts since returning to the site. The other post is a series of pictures of the rapper wearing an all-black outfit and elaborate gold chain featuring the names of his four children.

While Kanye's reactivated Instagram page had 5.6 million followers as WENN went to press, the Yeezy star is only following one account himself - that of his estranged wife Kim Kardashian.

Kanye will treat fans to snippets from Donda at a listening party at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on Thursday night, July 22.

He donated 5,000 tickets to the event to faculty, staff and students of Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Morehouse School of Medicine, Spelman College, Morris Brown College and ITC.
 

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Sha'Carri Richardson was offered a lucrative sponsorship contract following her suspension after she tested positive for marijuana last month.

The track & field star was banned from competing in the Tokyo Olympics later this month.

However, she was offered a lucrative contract with a vape company.

Vape company Dr. Dabber reportedly offered Richardson $250,000 to be a celebrity spokesperson for the company.

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In a letter obtained by theJasmineBrand, Dr. Dabber wrote:

"Dear Ms. Richardson,

We were saddened to learn of your recent suspension from the US Track and Field team, due to THC and missing the opportunity to compete at the 2021 Tokyo Olympic games. At Dr. Dabber, we believe that THC can actually have many positive effects on an athlete’s recovery and overall mental wellbeing."

The letter continued:

"Witnessing what you’re capable of in the Olympic trials, and how fabulous you looked while doing it, proved your star-power and ability to command the country’s attention. Considering your talent and grace over these past weeks, we would love to offer you the opportunity to work with our team as a spokesperson for Dr. Dabber."

Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

The company dropped troubled Disney actor Kyle Massey amid allegations that he sent explicit material to a 13-year-old girl.

He denied the allegations but a judge issued an arrest warrant when he failed to show up for a court hearing this week.

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Sha'Carri Richardson's name was left off the roster for the 4x100 relay team at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

The American sprinter received a 30-day suspension for a failed drug test after she won the 100-meter dash at the U.S. trials in Eugene, Oregon last month.

Richardson tested positive for THC, an ingredient found in marijuana. The positive test meant she would lose her spot on Team USA's 100-meter dash.

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The 21-year-old held out hope that she would still be part of the 4x100 relay team since her suspension was up before the start of the relays on Aug. 4.

However, her name was left off the roster USATF released on Tuesday.

Richardson received the bad news over the weekend. She sent out a series of tweets that suggested she didn't take the news well.

Richardson told her followers the Olympic Games will not be the same without her.

"The support [from] my community I thank y'all, the negative [people] forget y'all and enjoy the games because we all know it won't be the same... I'm sorry, I can't be y'all Olympic Champ this year but I promise I'll be your World Champ next year... All these perfect people that know how to live life, I'm glad I'm not one of them!"

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Celebrities and politicians are calling on Joe Biden to show support for track & field star Sha'Carri Richardson following her suspension for smoking marijuana.

The 30-day suspension means Richardson is out of the Tokyo Olympics where she was the favorite to win a gold medal in the 100-meter dash.

Republican congressman Matt Gaetz tweeted Friday:

"The press who love to bathe in the intersectionality of race-gender-sports should ask @JoeBiden if he believes Sha'carri Richardson should be barred from representing America for using a drug legal in most states that doesn’t impact performance.

I sure as hell don't."

Last week, Biden showed support for disgraced track and field athlete Gwen Berry after she turned her back on the American flag at the U.S. trials.

So far, the 46th president has not responded to Richardson's 30-day suspension.

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Other celebrities and notables who defended Richardson include actress Gabrielle Union who tweeted:

"Weed is great for many a thing but running faster isn't one of them. LET HER RUN!!! #ShacarriRichardson."

And ex-ESPN journo Jemele Hill tweeted:

"Between Sha'Carri Richardson and this, the Olympics really are sending quite the message to black women."

Sponsor Nike is standing by its athlete: "We appreciate Sha'Carri's honesty and accountability and will continue to support her through this time."

Others noted say the suspension is karma for Richardson's anti-Lil Nas X tweet in March.


 

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American sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson apologized to her fans for failing a drug test, that resulted in a 30-day suspension.

A source tells NBC that Richardson tested positive for THC, the main ingredient in marijuana, after she won the 100-meter dash at the U.S. Olympic trials in Eugene, Oregon last month.

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The positive test result means Richardson won't be allowed to compete in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games which kicks off on July 23 in Japan.

The 21-year-old Dallas native issued an apology on NBC's "Today" show on Friday morning. "I want to take responsibility for my actions. I know what I did. I know what I'm supposed to do. I know what I'm allowed not to do, and I still made that decision."

Richardson blamed her mother's sudden death last month for her lapse in good judgment. She said learning of her mother's death sent her into a state of "emotional panic."

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Richardson, who was raised by her aunt and grandmother, added:

"(I'm) not making an excuse or looking for any empathy in my case, but, however, being in that position in my life, finding out something like that, something that I would say is probably one of the biggest things that have impacted me ... that definitely was a very heavy topic on me. I greatly apologize if I let you guys down, and I did."

She dismissed rumors that she used performance-enhancing steroids. "It's never been a steroid. It will never be a steroid."

"Don't judge me because I am human. I'm you, I just happen to run a little faster."
 

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American sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson may miss the Tokyo Olympic Games this month after she reportedly tested positive for a prohibited substance.

According to The Jamaican Gleaner, Richardson, 21, tested positive for cannabis, aka marijuana, and could miss her chance to win a gold medal at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games which kicks off on July 23 in Japan.

Richardson faces a 30-day suspension from international competition.

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She has already withdrawn from a track and field meet in Stockholm, where she was scheduled to run in the 200-meter race.

Speculation ran rampant on social media that Richardson tested positive for performance enhancing drugs such as steroids.

However, it was reported by Reuters on Thursday that Richardson tested positive for cannabis at the U.S. Trials in Eugene, Oregon last month.

Richardson won the women's 100-meter dash in 10.86 seconds at the U.S. Trials.

Reuters also reported that the U.S trials' 4th place finisher Jenna Prandini was already asked to fill in the third spot on the USA Olympic team if Richardson is disqualified.

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Richardson's agent, Renaldo Nehemiah, former NFL star and record holder in the 110 meters, did not respond to Reuters' request for a comment.

The news prompted anger on social media. Many users questioned why Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps was allowed to compete in the Olympics after he admitted to smoking marijuana in 2009.

Phelps was suspended for 6 months in February 2009, but his suspension occurred during the off-season.

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The same people who praised sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson after she qualified for the Olympics, are dragging her on social media for defending Chris Brown.

Brown, 32, was arrested following a domestic dispute after attending a pre-Grammy Awards party with Rihanna in early February 2009.

In old tweets dating back to 2019, Richardson tells a Rihanna fan to shut up.

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"Oh my gosh SHUT UP !! Women like you are so annoying. None of us are perfect that was a mistake he made years ago & was dubbed throught [sic] the mud about for YEARS. It’s not right for anyone to put theirs hands on another person but y'all don't say anything about the fact that.

"Dragged through *but y'all don't say anything about the fact Rihanna hit him where is that criticism at. He came out & apologize but what did she do Both were wrong and both have move on with their lives why can't y’all."


 

Richardson, 21, qualified for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team, winning the women's 100-meter dash in 10.86 seconds at the Olympic trials in Eugene, Oregon.

Afterwards, she confirmed her LGBT+ status by tweeting a rainbow.
 

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The LGBT+ community has fallen in love with USA sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson after she thanked her girlfriend for choosing her fiery orange hair weave.

Richardson, 21, qualified for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team, winning the women's 100-meter dash at the Olympic trials in Eugene, Oregon over the weekend.

She ran a blistering 10.86 seconds, with her long, orange hair weave flapping in the wind behind her.

Afterwards, Richardson thanked her girlfriend for choosing the vibrant color of her weave.

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"She said it just spoke to her, the fact that it was just so loud and vibrant," Richardson told USA Today.

"She felt like [orange] was loud and encouraging and, honestly, dangerous... That's who I am. She just wanted me to be able to make a statement — let's continue to show the world I'm a force to be reckoned with."

Richardson also posted a rainbow emoji on her Twitter feed, which prompted a plethora of rainbow tweets in her Twitter timeline.

After her qualifying run, the 5-foot-1 sprinter revealed the sad news that she lost her biological mother last week.

Richardson, who was raised by her grandmother and aunt, said she loved her mother and she knew her mother loved her, despite not bonding with her mom.

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My grandmother is my heart. My grandmother is my superwoman," she told NBC.

"To be able to have her here, at the biggest meet of my life and being able to run up the steps and knowing that I'm an Olympian now... Honestly, that probably felt better than winning the race itself."

Richardson will have stiff competition from Jamaica's two-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in Tokyo next month.

Fraser-Pryce, 34, ran 10.63 on June 5 to become the second-fastest woman in history after FLorence Griffith Joyner.