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Snoop Dogg's daughter, Cori Broadus, opened up about having suicidal thoughts in a post on Instagram over the weekend.

Cori, 21, shared a series of photos that show her having a romantic seaside picnic with a friend.

In the post caption, Cori explained that she nearly took her own life in the last few weeks. She said her family and social media followers gave her "a purpose to live & helped me realize Iife is much more than materialistic things..."

"The last few weeks my mental has not been so great at one point I tried to end my life but you & my family really give me a purpose to live & helped me realize Iife is much more than materialistic things & you gotta just keep pushing through the bullshit. THANK YOU... #mentalhealthawareness."

Although Cori changed her mind about ending her life, she is not out of the woods yet.

Mental health experts say most people who have suicidal thoughts do not go on to attempt suicide. But suicidal ideations are a risk factor for suicide.

Expressing suicidal thoughts publicly means they may already be in the planning stage, and intervention is necessary.

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Cori, 2nd from left, is pictured with her father Snoop Dogg, her mom Shante Broadus, right, and brother Cordell Broadus, left, at the ceremony honoring Snoop Dogg with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on November 19, 2018 in Hollywood, California.

Cori followed in her father's footsteps by recording a single titled "Do My Thang" in 2011. Snoop was featured on her single "Daddy's Girl" and she and rapper Drake were both featured on Snoop's No Guns Allowed album.

If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. A trained crisis worker is available 24/7.

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Taraji P. Henson admits she battled suicidal thoughts at the height of the coronavirus lockdown and considered shooting herself in the head.

Speaking on her Facebook Watch show "Peace of Mind with Taraji" on Wednesday, Dec. 23, the Empire star told Dr. LaShonda Green about her situational depression.

"During this pandemic, it's been hard on all of us and I had a moment. I had a dark moment. I was in a dark place," she confessed. "For a couple of days, I couldn't get out of bed, I didn't care. That's not me.

"Then I started having thoughts about ending it. It happened two nights in a row and I purchased a gun not too long ago; it's in a safe, and I started like, 'I could go in there right now and end it all, because I want it to be over'.

"I thought about my son, he's grown, he'll get over it. I didn't care. I felt myself withdrawing. People were calling me, I wasn’t responding, I didn’t care."

But Taraji overcame her suicidal ideations by confiding in a dear friend.

"I felt like, if I don't say it, it becomes a plan," she added. "What scared me is I did it two nights in a row. First, it was like, 'I don't wanna be here'. Then I started thinking about going to get the gun and that’s why when I woke up the next morning, I blurted it out."

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Taraji is among the Hollywood stars whose careers and incomes have taken a hit due to the lockdowns. She also recently broke up with her fiancé, NFL player Kelvin Hayden, whom she began dating in 2018.

Adding to her woes, a planned Empire spin-off series featuring her character Cookie Lyon was shelved. She has also been very open about her mental health issues.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide or in a crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255. Trained counselors are waiting to take your call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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A Black man's hanging death in Southern California has officially been ruled a suicide based on an autopsy and a purchase from a local Dollar Tree store.

Robert Fuller, 24, was found hanging from a tree in front of Palmdale City Hall in Poncitlán Square on June 10.

Authorities launched a monthlong investigation after Fuller's family rejected the official cause of death.

"The explanation of suicide does not seem plausible," his family said in a statement. "There are many ways to die, but considering the current racial tension, a Black man hanging himself from a tree definitely doesn't sit well with us right now. We want justice, not comfortable excuses."

Authorities focused their investigation on the red rope and fabric found in the tree. Police said there was a May 14 purchase on Fuller's EBT card that was consistent with the red rope used in the hanging.

Sheriff's Commander Chris Marks said Fuller had a history of depression and was hospitalized three times since 2017, according to the NY Times.

Fuller told doctors he had suicidal ideations and had previously put a gun to his head. His last hospital admission was in November. He told doctors at a hospital in Nevada that he "did have a plan to kill himself," Marks said.

Jason R. Hicks, a lawyer representing Fuller's family, said he planned to respond to the sheriff's department's finding. The family does not have any comments at this time.
 

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Karrine Steffans, aka Superhead, claims she was knocked up by "serial entrepreneur" Everett Taylor - and now he's threatening suicide.

Taylor, a 31-year-old tech wizard who founded the marketing software PopSocial, took to Instagram to threaten suicide after Steffans claimed she is pregnant with his baby.

Taylor described Steffans as an "evil" person who "has been a huge trigger for my depression, anxiety and just overall struggles with my mental health."

Taylor said Steffans threatened to destroy his career whenever he tried to leave her.

"For years I would do whatever she said, and give her anything she needed. If I did not, she would threaten to ruin my career."

He said her constant threats sent him to a "darker place," and when he reached out to another male friend of Steffans', the man advised Taylor to cut off all communications with her.

Some people say Taylor's lengthy suicide note is a cry for help. One friend assured Taylor's social media followers that he is fine.

Steffans made her mark in the literary world with the release of her first book, Confessions of a Video Vixen (2005). In the sensational book, she described her brief oral fixations with bold name rappers and athletes, including Jay Z and Shaquille O'Neal.

Read Taylor's suicide note below.
 

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