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Actress Ellie Kemper, best known for her role in the TV series "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," was once crowned queen at a KKK ball.

Kemper, 41, starred in the TV series from 2015 to 2019. She played a woman who is rescued from a doomsday cult and begins a new life in New York City. The series also starred comics Tina Fey and Tituss Burgess (pictured above with Kemper).

A photo showing then-teenage Kemper being named queen of the Veiled Prophet Ball in St. Louis prompted accusations of white supremacy.

The photo was published by the Post-Dispatch newspaper in 1999. The photo caption reads: "Elizabeth Claire Kemper, as the 1999 Veiled Prophet Queen of Love and Beauty, is attended by her pages."

According to the NY Post's Page Six, "The Veiled Prophet is said to be dressed with a white klan-style hood and robe while armed with a pistol and rifle."

Another Post-Dispatch article described Kemper as a 19-year-old freshman student at Princeton University.

A Twitter user posted the newspaper image along with the caption: "So was no one gonna tell me Ellie kemper aka kimmy Schmidt was crowned KKK queen in 1999."

Film critic Jon Negroni tweeted:

"it really is something that Ellie Kemper was the star of a tv show about a woman who leaves a racist cult and tries to rebrand herself while pretending it never happened. no reason why I’m bringing this up of course,” film critic Jon Negroni tweeted."

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Richard Spencer made headlines when he announced he's voting the Democratic ticket in November.

Spencer (center) and his supporters clashed with Virginia State Police in Emancipation Park at the "Unite the Right" rally on August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Spencer famously endorsed President Donald Trump in the 2016 elections. But he says he's switching tickets because he believes Biden is a bigger racist than Trump.

"I plan to vote for Biden and a straight democratic ticket. It's not based on "accelerationism" or anything like that; the liberals are clearly more competent people," Spencer tweeted on Sunday.

Biden's camp hastily rejected Spencer's endorsement.

"When Joe Biden says we are in a battle for the soul of our nation against vile forces of hate who have come crawling out from under rocks, you are the epitome of what he means. What you stand for is absolutely repugnant. Your support is 10,000% percent unwelcome here," Biden's campaign tweeted.

Biden, 77, helped author the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act that later became known as the 1994 crime bill.

Biden oversaw the Senate Judiciary Committee at the time. The bill was signed into law by former President Bill Clinton in 1994.

Many Black males were incarcerated under the 1994 crime bill. Biden's running mate, California Senator Kamala Harris, was a prosecutor who locked up more Black males than her predecessor.

Together, Biden and Harris have locked up more Black people than any presidential candidates in history.

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Black Twitter's cancel culture upended Doja Cat's career overnight. The 24-year-old L.A. native saw her career evaporate into thin air after video leaked that showed her chatting with white supremacists.

In the video, the biracial singer is seen flirting with the white men in an alt-right chat room. At one point she blurts out "ni**er" while the men laugh. Doja, whose mother is Jewish-American, seemed comfortable using racial slurs.

After the clip began making the rounds online, fans also dug up one of her songs, believed to be from 2015, entitled "Dindu Nuffin" - which is known to be a racial slur for Black criminals, who claim to be innocent after facing police brutality.

She sings on the track: "How much nothing can a dindu do / If a dindu, dindu nothin' / How much money could a dindu make / If a dindu did all the things that you wish to."

Some believe that the song was targeted at Sandra Bland, a Black woman who died in police custody in 2015.

Doja responded to the backlash late Sunday night. Some say her explanation is too little, too late.

Question: Do you forgive Doja, or is she still canceled?

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New England draft pick Justin Rohrwasser denies he is a white supremacist or that a tattoo on his left arm is a white supremacist logo.

Rohrwasser said he got the tattoo inked when he was 14. The tattoo is of the Roman numeral 3 surrounded by a ring of stars. It is the logo of a right-wing organization called "Three Percenters."

He also has the phrase "Don't tread on me" tatted on his left forearm. The phrase is associated with conservative groups such as the Tea Party.

Looking back, he says he wished he had done more research into the tattoo. He agreed to cover it up when he's on the field.

"It's not something I ever want to represent, so it will be covered."

That wasn't good enough for sports journalist and Twitter activist Jemele Hill who called the NFL kicker out on Twitter.com.

Hill took to Twitter to complain about the tattoo, saying: "Patriots kicker is a white supremacist. My bad, he tends to like white supremacist things. Carry on, nothing to see here."