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Subway

Most people who order tuna sandwiches from Subway restaurants expect the sandwich to contain some fish in the ingredients.

But a new federal lawsuit claims analysis of Subway tuna sandwiches finds the ingredients do not contain tuna or even fish.

"We found that the ingredients were not tuna and not fish," said one of two attorneys representing two plaintiffs in the lawsuit in an email to The Washington Post.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, claimed the company intentionally made "false and misleading representations about tuna being used as an ingredient."

The lawsuit does not explain what's in the Subway tuna sandwiches.

"As independent testing has repeatedly affirmed, the Products are made from anything but tuna," the lawsuit states. "On the contrary, the Products are made from a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by Defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna."

Subway denied the claims that the sandwiches don't contain real tuna.

According to Subway's website, the tuna sandwich contains "flaked tuna blended with creamy mayo then topped with your choice of crisp, fresh veggies."

There simply is no truth to the allegations in the complaint that was filed in California,' a company spokesperson told DailyMail.com.

"Subway delivers 100 per cent cooked tuna to its restaurants, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches, wraps and salads that are served to and enjoyed by our guests," Subway claimed.

"The taste and quality of our tuna make it one of Subway's most popular products and these baseless accusations threaten to damage our franchisees, small business owners who work tirelessly to uphold the high standards that Subway sets for all of its products, including its tuna.

Rob Rich/WENN.com

Ja Rule weighed in after Robinhood banned trading of GameStop ($GME) stocks on its app on Thursday.

A group of maverick day traders on Reddit.com destroyed at least one Wall Street hedge fund when they purchased GameStop stocks before the hedge funds could buy the stocks to cover their short positions.

Hedge funds bet that a company will fail by "shorting" the company's stock even though they don't own the stock. If the stock price falls, they earn money. But if the stock rises (as was the case with GameStop), the hedge funds must buy the stocks to cover their bets or lose billions of dollars.

Teenagers on Reddit earned millions when the stock surged from $36 on Jan. 19 to $336 on Wednesday.

GameStop stock rallied to $500 before the opening bell on Thursday morning, then plunged more than 60% after Robinhood banned GameStop trades on the app.

Robinhood users complained that the app blocked them from buying more shares. Users could only sell their GameStop shares -- which helped hedge funds buy more shares to cover their short positions.

At least one lawsuit has been filed against Robinhood app for manipulating the stock market to help hedge funds by preventing day traders from buying more GameStop stock.

Rapper Ja Rule urged Robinhood users not to sell their shares of GameStop. He tweeted: "Yo this is a f***ing CRIME what @RobinhoodApp is doing DO NOT SELL!!! HOLD THE LINE... WTF."

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Billionaire Mark Cuban also advised traders on Robinhood and Reddit to hold their shares so the hedge funds can't buy the stocks: "Get loud and get long."

Cuban tweeted on Thursday: "So are @robinhoodapp and @IBKR ending trading in #wallstreetbets stocks because they are losing their ass on these trades? Or maybe they dont have the cash to enable the trades at this scale ? Anyone have any insight on their economics? [sic]."

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And Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tweeted: "This is unacceptable.

We now need to know more about @RobinhoodApp's decision to block retail investors from purchasing stock while hedge funds are freely able to trade the stock as they see fit.

As a member of the Financial Services Cmte, I'd support a hearing if necessary."

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LightRocket via Getty Images

By now you've heard about the hedge fund-busting antics on Robinhood and Reddit.com where teenagers became millionaires overnight by investing in GameStop stocks.

The stock price is being fueled by hedge funds desperately covering their short positions in GameStop, the video game retailer.

Hedge funds were short-selling GameStop -- or betting that the company would fail. The lower the stock price fell, the more money the hedge funds made.

But they didn't bet that a group of scrappy day traders on Reddit would rally to save GameStop from certain failure.

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When Redditors began purchasing GameStop stocks on Jan. 19, the stock was selling at less than $30 a share. Just one week later the stock price hit a whopping $336 a share -- and the price is going higher.

The catalyst for GameStop to explode higher came on Friday, Jan. 22, when Citron Research announced it would not comment on GameStop any longer due to the actions of "an angry mob" -- the "angry mob" being amateur day traders on Reddit and RobinHood.

Some teenagers who purchased GameStop stock options on the Robinhood stock trading app on Jan. 19 are millionaires today. Others are crying tears of joy because they earned enough money to pay for surgery or to buy a new car.

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CNN laughably referred to the "angry mob" on Reddit.com as "Trump supporters."

In an unprecedented move to protect hedge funds on Wednesday, stock broker TD Ameritrade halted trading on GameStop.

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YouTube/NBA TV

Atlanta-based NBA reporter Sekou Smith passed away Tuesday. He was 48. His exact cause of death wasn’t given, but Smith had tested positive for Covid-19.

Smith was a sports analyst and reporter on NBA TV and NBA.com. He worked out of the Turner Sports offices in Atlanta.

Before joining Turner, Smith was an Atlanta Hawks beat writer for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

In a statement, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called Smith "one of the most affable and dedicated reporters in the NBA."

NBA stars reacted to the news of Smith's passing on social media.

Chris Paul tweeted: "Man today just got a little heavier... my condolences to Sekou's wife, family, friends, and extended NBA family. What a kind and compassionate man we just lost."

Retired NBA star Dwyane Wade wrote: "I've never had anything but positive interactions and conversations with Sekou Smith. Our prayers go out to the Smith family. We lost a good one. Rest in Heaven."

In a tribute on NBA TV, reporter Matt Winer referred to Smith as "a journalist's journalist. Skeptical. Endearingly cranky. Always passionate about the subject matter he loved though: sports. And most importantly, a devoted husband and father. A great friend to so many of us here..."

Smith leaves behind a wife, Heather, and three children, Gabriel, Reilly and Cameron.
&nbs;

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Atlanta PD, FOX 5, Rep. Masha Maison

A man accused of stalking state Representative Mesha Mainor lashed out at her in alarming jailhouse phone calls.

The FOX 5 I-Team obtained recordings of the jailhouse phone calls through the Georgia Open Records Act.

In 2019, Mainor was running for Atlanta City Council when she told a volunteer campaign volunteer he could no longer work for her.

The campaign volunteer -- Corwin Monson -- launched a campaign of harassment against Mainor that included calling her hundreds of times a day and leaving frightening voicemail messages.

"It became frightening,” she told Atlanta Progressive News. "By May, he was dropping gifts off at my house because he couldn't talk to me."

Mainor filed a restraining order against Monson in July 2019. She told a judge Monson joined her church to be close to her. He showed up to her home an average of 2-3 times a week.

The judge granted her request for a restraining order. Weeks later, Mainor filed a police report, claiming Monson "violated a restraining order" and showed up at her church, Friendship Baptist, "sitting in the church just looking at her."

Police arrested Monson and charged him with felony aggravated stalking. He was released on bond, FOX 5 News reports.

Monson was arrested again a year later on another aggravated stalking charge for contacting Mainor through her Facebook page.

Monson was locked up again in December 2020. He remains in jail, awaiting trial.

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FOX 5 News

"Praise God, he is in jail. I feel a little bit safer," said Mainor, who was sworn in as the new state representative from the 59th District in Atlanta a month later.

But Monson's phone calls continued even after he was locked up and denied bail.

"I don't want that bitch being no state representative. Keep that b**** out of the State House. Now, let's play hardball," Monson said on one jail house call.

On one of the calls, Monson said he will stay in prison for ten years if he has to get back at her. "I want that b**** shutdown," he said.

"The fact that he would say he would stay in jail for 10 years out of sheer hatred for me. That's crazy. If a judge lets him out, what do you think he's going to do to me," Mainor told The FOX I-Team.

In another conversation, Monson tells his wife, he wants Representative Mainor criminally charged with theft and perjury for allegedly stealing his lawn furniture.

Commissioner Marvin Arrington Jr. withdrew as Monson's attorney, after Mainor filed an ethics complaint and a bar complaint against him on Oct. 21, 2020.

Rich Fury/Getty Images

Award-winning TV and radio host Larry King died on Saturday morning, Jan. 23, at age 87.

His death was confirmed in an announcement posted on his official Twitter account: "With profound sadness, Ora Media announces the death of our co-founder, host, and friend Larry King, who passed away this morning at age 87 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles."

The cause of death was not revealed, but King was recently hospitalized in critical condition after he tested positive for COVID-19.

Born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger in New York City, King began his career as a local Florida journalist and radio interviewer in the 1950s and 1960s.

He gained prominence beginning in 1978 as host of The Larry King Show, an all-night nationwide call-in radio program heard on the Mutual Broadcasting System.

King became a household name when his iconic Larry King Live aired between 1985 and 2010. His guests included politicians, celebrities, sports stars and well-known conspiracy theorists.

King battled numerous health problems over the years, including prostate cancer and type-two diabetes. In 1987, he suffered a heart attack that required quintuple-bypass surgery, and in 2017 he underwent surgery to remove a malignant tumor in his lung.

Last year, two of King's five children – son Andy and daughter Chaia – died within weeks of each other.

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

Baseball legend Henry "Hank" Aaron, who passed away early Friday at age 86, rolled up his sleeves to take the first of two doses of the Moderna mRNA vaccine at the Morehouse School of Medicine on Tuesday, January 5th.

At the time, Aaron said he wanted to take the vaccine to send a message to Black Americans that the injections are safe.

"I don't have any qualms about it at all, you know," he told the Associated Press. "I feel quite proud of myself for doing something like this. It's just a small thing that can help zillions of people in this country."

The Baseball Hall of Famer took to Twitter.com to urge other Black people to get the shots:

"I was proud to get the COVID-19 vaccine earlier today at Morehouse School of Medicine. I hope you do the same!"

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Twitter

Former UN Ambassador Andrew Young and former Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan also got vaccinated at the Morehouse clinic that day.

The three legends acknowledged the mistrust Black people have in the government after the infamous Tuskegee experiment that left Black men untreated for syphilis.

"I've been taking vaccines now for 88 years and I haven't been sick," Young said. "The truth of it is, Black folk have been living by shots, and just because they did something crazy and murderous and evil back in 1931, we're still thinking about that. We've got to get over that."

Swedish officials recommended doctors avoid giving mRNA vaccines to frail people when 33 elderly people died after taking Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines. Another 136 people in Sweden suffered side effects from the vaccines.

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Twitter

SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump took pity on thousands of National Guard troops who were booted out of the Capitol Building and forced to sleep in a cold parking garage.

5,000 National Guard troops, who were sleeping in hallways and in the Senate cafeteria, were ordered out of the Capitol building because one soldier didn't wear a face mask.

An anonymous source in Washington DC told TPUSA Chief Creative Officer Benny Johnson that for the last week his battalion had been sleeping on the floor in the Senate cafeteria after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) ordered the troops out of the Capitol building and they were forced to sleep in a parking garage in 38-degree temperatures.

The parking garage has one bathroom and 1 power outlet for 5,000 soldiers to use.

Some of the soldiers hadn't showered or changed clothes in 2 weeks.

Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Governors Ron DeSantis (R-FL), Chris Sununu (R-NH) and Greg Abbott (R-TX) were so outraged over the treatment of their troops that they ordered the soldiers to return home immediately.

After the public backlash, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi allowed the troops back inside the Capitol building.

According to One America News Network (OANN), Trump gave permission for the remaining troops to stay at his luxury Trump Hotel in DC if any of them needed a warm bed, a shower or a hot meal.

Trump reportedly called the soldier's treatment "Disgusting and unforgivable."

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Prior to Trump's offer, the troops were forced to subsist on bowls of chili and an occasional slice of pizza donated by sympathetic congressmen.
 

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Atlanta Braves legend Hank Aaron passed away early Friday, Jan. 22. He was 86. The family did not reveal a cause of death.

Born Henry Louis Aaron in Mobile, Alabama, the 25-time All-Star was best known for breaking Babe Ruth's all-time home run record with his 715th home run.

The scene of Aaron being mobbed by fans as he rounded the bases remains an iconic moments in Major League Baseball history.

The original fence and wall where Aaron's 715th home run landed still stands in the same spot in the parking lot of Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia.

Aaron ended his remarkable career with 755 career home runs. His record was surpassed by San Francisco Giants legend Barry Bonds, who was suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Aaron, pictured with his wife Billye in 2019, still holds several MLB offensive records. The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on its "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list.

After retiring from baseball, he served as the senior vice president of the Atlanta Braves.

In 1982, he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Aaron is survived by his wife Billye Suber Williams and six children.
 

Screengrab: Getty Images

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver suggested that NBA players receive the Covid-19 mRNA vaccines first as a PSA for Black people.

In a Zoom interview with Sportico, Silver said Black people are 3 times more likely to die from Covid, and "somewhat perversely, there's been enormous resistance in the African American community" to getting vaccinated 'for understandable historical reasons."

Adams said he spoke with the people who ran the trials at Pfizer and Moderna who told him the Black community declined to volunteer during the 6-month testing phase.

"If that resistance continues, based on the earlier data I cited, there'll be very much a double whammy to the Black community because the only way, ultimately, out of this pandemic is to get vaccinated."

Adams suggested NBA players should get preferential treatment and be allowed to jump the line because they have "great influence" among young Black people who may be more willing to roll up their sleeves after they see NBA players getting vaccines.

The reaction was overwhelmingly negative on Twitter.com. One user wrote: "Is it racist to think black folks will take the vaccine because a basketball player take it?"

User @ZuluX11 tweeted: "This is becoming disturbing. When have you ever cared about the Black Community? Why are trying so desperately to force the vaccine on us? Why isnt he mentioning his personal community? Force it on them. I hope people wake up eventually."

And a third user wrote: "Imagine if Trump chose a bunch of white people to give it to to spread the word so the white community trusts the vaccine.....lol double standard much? Is this how the next 4yrs gon be? 4 yrs of #DoAsISayNotAsIDoDems its gon be rough [sic]."
 

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