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Erykah Badu and Elon Musk both found discrepancies in Covid-19 tests they took this week.

They reported the discrepancies on social media -- and were immediately attacked by their followers who don't want the truth revealed.

Erykah took to Twitter on Friday, Nov. 13, to question the accuracy of two Covid-19 tests she took as part of a job requirement.

"This is my third rapid test in 24 hours... Earlier I took 2 and one was positive the other neg in separate nostrils ?? We need to investigate these tests further. I want my $ back."

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She added: "Funny thing is, Dr. ONLY reported the positive result. What the fack is goin on here?"

Get-well wishes poured in for the R&B singer. But Erykah told her supporters she is feeling fine.

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On Thursday, Elon, the CEO of Tesla, tweeted similar concerns about his conflicting tests:

"Something extremely bogus is going on. Was tested for covid four times today. Two tests came back negative, two came back positive. Same machine, same test, same nurse. Rapid antigen test from BD."

Elon's followers scolded him for reporting the inaccuracy in his tests. But Elon did some investigating, and he learned about a widely known flaw in the PCR tests that produce high numbers of false positive results when run at cycles of 40 and above.

He tweeted: "Lab I just spoke to said cov2 PCR detection (N1 & N3 genes) below 30 cycles is reliable & above 40 cycles is not."

PCR tests are run in cycles of 20-40 repeated thermal temperature changes. Cycles run at 30 or below are considered to be more reliable.

For example, labs that process Covid-19 tests for the NBA and NFL run cycles of 30 or below, which produces more reliable and accurate test results.

But government-controlled labs are processing PCR tests at 40 cycles or higher - which produces a high frequency of false-positive results.

The news media gleefully reports "surging Covid-19 cases" or "a spike in Covid-19 cases" when most of the tests are flawed.

PCR was invented in 1984 by the American biochemist Kary Mullis, who won a Nobel Prize in 1993 for his work.

When Mullis issued warnings about the inaccuracy of his PCR tests, he suddenly died of pneumonia on August 7, 2019.

In 2009, when former President Barack Obama was in office, the CDC stopped reporting H1N1 cases because the tests were unreliable and some labs were co-mingling positive flu results in with the H1N1 results.

What is their end game?

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Many believe governments are taking drastic measures to save the environment (climate change) and control the population.

Billionaire elites such as Bill Gates believe their fellow humans are the biggest threat to the environment.

Strict stay-at-home orders will ensure you can't drive for weeks or months, which decreases C02 released into the atmosphere.

And there is much discussion online about vaccines impairing the human reproductive system.

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Americans who refuse to get mandated Covid-19 vaccinations may lose benefits such as food stamps (WIC) and rent assistance, according to a document from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Health Security.

According to the document, one of the top members of the "Working Group of Readying Populations for COVID-19 Vaccines" is Luciana Borio, MD, a prominent member of Joe Biden's Covid-19 taskforce.

Borio recommends recruiting celebrities and social media influencers to speak to "specific audiences" about the urgency of taking the vaccine.

The document says "bundling" vaccines with food stamps would be, "a way to build trust" among low-income people such as "Blacks and minority communities."

The taskforce will target grocery stores, community centers, schools, nursing homes, and elderly daycare centers to reach populations that may not have access to the vaccines.

"In some cases, it also may be acceptable and feasible to deliver vaccinations via home visits by community health nurses" who go door-to-door to vaccinate people.

The paper acknowledges Blacks and minorities have been lied to and abused by the U.S. government in the past.

Celebrities and influencers will be recruited to deliver "a salient and specific message repeatedly" to "reinforce a unified message about COVID-19 vaccination."

Read the full document in PDF form here.

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As a possible Covid-19 vaccine April availability date looms, some Americans have expressed concerns about their employers forcing them to get the vaccine.

The New York State Bar Association on Saturday voted to approve a resolution urging the state to make Covid-19 mRNA vaccinations mandatory for all New Yorkers -- even those who object for "religious, philosophical or personal reasons."

Other local governments are considering their own vaccine mandates for a virus that causes no symptoms or mild flu-like symptoms 99.4% of the time.

According to AARP, you can you lose your job if you don't take the COVID-19 vaccination. "An employer can make a vaccination a requirement if you want to continue working there."

"Employment in the United States is generally 'at will,' which means that your employer can set working conditions," says Dorit Reiss, a law professor at the University of California.

AARP said there are exceptions, such as medical disability or religious beliefs. As mentioned before, New Yorkers can't object for "religious, philosophical or personal reasons." But a medical disability may be acceptable.

It also depends on whether your job is indispensable and not easily outsourced.

As a RN, your auntie worked at hospitals up and down the Eastern seaboard. Every hospital had a flu vaccine mandate. None of the hospitals pressed the issue when I declined to take the flu vaccine. I didn't have to give a reason. I simply signed a waiver form and it was placed in my employee file.

Update: Ticketmaster announced it will verify if fans received Covid-19 vaccinations or tested negative before issuing tickets.

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The public is beginning to suspect that the government's rush to bring a Covid-19 vaccine to market is a money grab by big Pharma.

Just a day after announcing Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine is more than 90% effective in preventing the coronavirus, company CEO Albert Bourla sold 62% of his stock.

The company's claim of 90% efficacy for its vaccine was not independently verified.

The large stock sale sparked allegations of a "pump and dump" insider trading scheme to earn maximum profit by releasing favorable information about a stock before dumping the stock on the open market.

The SEC Form 4 filing obtained by Axios.com shows Bourla sold 132,508 shares at an average price of $41.94 per share, equivalent to $5.6 million.

A Pfizer spokesperson told Axios that the CEO's stock trade was planned in August and the trade was executed on Tuesday.

Other pharmaceutical companies developing vaccines such as Moderna, also made similar stock sales after announcing favorable news about their vaccines.

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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is threatening to stop the Covid-19 mRNA vaccination distribution while President Donald Trump is in office -- because the vaccine distribution won't be mandatory.

In a discussion with ABC's George Stephanopolous on Good Morning America on Monday, Cuomo said Pfizer's announcement that it's mRNA vaccine is 90% effective is "good news." But he will stop the distribution rather than allow Trump to get the credit.

Pfizer said it is prepared to roll out the vaccines under a plan already in place with the Trump administration.

But Cuomo said he fears Trump's plan to use private distribution to drug stores, clinics and hospitals will be "too slow".

"The vaccine plan is very important, and it's probably the most ambitious undertaking since COVID began," he said. "Just to put it in focus, we did 120 million COVID tests in this nation over seven months, scrambling, doing everything we can. We now have to do 330 million vaccinations, maybe twice."

Cuomo said distributing the vaccines through the normal channels (drug stores and hospitals) will bypass the main target community (Black people).

"They're going to take this vaccine and go through the private mechanism, through hospitals, through drug [store] chains, etc., that's going to be slow, and that's going to bypass the communities that we call 'health care deserts.'"

Cuomo said communities that don't have drug stores will have trouble gaining access to the vaccine.

When asked what Joe Biden would do differently, Cuomo declined to go into specifics.

On his website, Biden specified a large task force of 100,000 people and an extensive "track and trace" system to ensure that every citizen in American takes the vaccine.

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Drug manufacturer Pfizer Inc. says its Covid-19 mRNA vaccine is more than 90% effective in preventing the coronavirus.

Pfizer released its efficacy analysis revealing its vaccine has likely prevented more than 90% of cases. Pfizer declared the breakthrough as "a great day for science and humanity."

Pfizer recruited 42,000 volunteers separated into two groups, with one group to receive a placebo. 94 volunteers who were vaccinated went on to test positive for Covid-19.

Pfizer says the trial will continue until 164 positive cases have occurred.

The company hopes to obtain authorization for emergency use from the Food and Drug Administration by the third week of November for people aged 16 to 85.

The news was met with great skepticism from the government's main target group -- Black people.

An Instagram user wrote: "I'm good y'all let me know how it goes [peace emoji]."

A second user wrote: "The vaccine is FREE for ALL Americans... Since when is a vaccine or anything dealing with healthcare free... Ummm, no thanks."

Others were suspicious that the news comes just days after the presidential election.

One Instagram user wrote: "Interesting considering the elections are ... nvm [never mind]."

Local governments anticipate some resistance from the public who refuse to take the vaccine. They are ready to implement laws to crack down hard on resistance.

The New York State Bar Association on Saturday voted to approve a resolution urging the state to make Covid-19 mRNA vaccinations mandatory for all New Yorkers -- even those who object for "religious, philosophical or personal reasons."

Other local governments are monitoring New York closely as they also prepare to enact similar vaccine mandates.

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The New York State Bar Association on Saturday voted to approve a resolution urging the state to make Covid-19 mRNA vaccinations mandatory for all New Yorkers -- even those who object for "religious, philosophical or personal reasons."

The bar association met on Saturday to vote on the mandatory recommendation if voluntary Covid-19 vaccinations fail to produce satisfactory immunity levels in the population.

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If the state adopts the Bar's recommendations, every New Yorker will be forced to line up when the vaccines become available.

The timing of the NYSBA's vote -- coming just four days after the presidential elections -- seems suspicious to some objectors.

"The authority of the state to respond to a public health crisis is well-established in constitutional law," said Mary Beth Morrissey, chair of the Health Law Section's Task Force on COVID-19.

Among the NYSBA's recommendations is releasing older inmates and prisoners with disabilities and serious illnesses who do not pose a danger to the community.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who has a vaccine in development for months, said multiple vaccinations per person will be necessary to achieve immunity.

The normal timeline for vaccine development is three years.

Gates said Black people and healthcare workers should be first in line to receive the mandatory injections.

Interestingly, Gates disabled comments under this post.

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Ice Cube laughed and referred to Black Democrats as "sheeple" in response to a follower who asked him who he voted for on Nov. 3.

"Neither one...I've always endorsed the sheeple," he said.

In a follow-up tweet, he wrote:

"Let me get this straight, I get the president of the United States to agree to put over half a trillion dollars of capital in the Black Community (without an endorsement) and Niggas are mad at me? [crying laughing emojis] ...have a nice life."

Other Trump supporters fear that, if Biden and Harris win, they will abandon the Black community.

Social media users list the following that might impact the Black community:

1. Lockdowns will begin in January.
2. Significant job losses will negatively impact Black people.
3. Evictions will skyrocket.
4. National mask mandate that ends in 2022 (midterm elections).
5. Black people forced to accept the "Mark of the Beast" (vaccines).
6. Black men will be sterilized and Black births will drop.

Others call Trump supporters "doomers" who spread conspiracy theories because their side lost. They point to the Democrats' promise to send $1,200 checks to Black people next year.
 

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A Phase 3 vaccine developed by drug manufacturer AstraZeneca was put on hold when a volunteer in the UK fell ill after suffering a "serious adverse reaction" to the vaccine.

The vaccine being developed by drug manufacturer AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford in England was put on hold after a UK participant experienced a "serious adverse reaction".

The adverse reaction was described only as an "unexplained illness" in one of the trials.

A spokesperson for AstraZeneca, the frontrunner in the race for the first Covid-19 RNA vaccine, said in a statement on Tuesday that the company's "standard review process triggered a pause" to allow for a "review of safety data."

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Another source within the company, who spoke to Statnews.com on condition of anonymity, said the adverse reaction is having an impact on other AstraZeneca vaccine trials, as well as clinical trials being conducted by different vaccine manufacturers.

Nine drug manufacturers have vaccine studies currently under way in the U.S. and abroad.

The U.S. is currently testing vaccines at 62 sites across the country, according to clinicaltrials.gov.

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AstraZeneca's clinical trial is the first to reach the critical Phase 3 stage - the final step before the vaccine gets FDA approval. The normal timeframe for clinical trials is three years.

Adverse reactions to vaccines that require hospitalization may include life-threatening illness and even death.

Doctors in the U.S. are concerned that the vaccines are being rushed to market without adequate time to determine side effects.

Although healthcare professionals are due to get the vaccines first, many doctors and nurses say they will decline to take a vaccination that is rushed to market -- particularly since the Covid death rate is way below 1%.

Fully one third of Americans say they will refuse the vaccine if one is available before the election in November.

News of the adverse reaction sent AstraZeneca's stock tumbling 8% in after hours trading on Tuesday.

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Kamala Harris refuses to say whether she would take the RNA vaccine if it becomes available in October or November.

President Trump has insisted a vaccine will be available by the end of the year, and potentially before the November 3 elections.

"It will be delivered before the end of the year, in my opinion, before the end of the year, but it really might even be delivered before the end of October," Trump said Thursday. "How do you like that? Wouldn't that be nice?"

But the Democratic vice presidential candidate said she doesn't trust Trump's word on the safety or efficacy of a vaccine that was rushed through three years' worth of clinical trials in a matter of months.

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In an interview with CNN, Harris said, "I would not trust Donald Trump and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he's talking about. I will not take his word for it."

Alarm bells went off when the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent letters to governors in every state requesting that states consider "waiving requirements" to allow vaccine distribution sites to be fully operational by November 1st.

Unlike normal vaccines, RNA vaccines are "encoded" with genetic "instructions" that tell your cells what to do.

Many Americans expressed concern that the CDC might be subjecting them to a potentially harmful vaccine.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who sits on the White House Coronavirus Task Force, doesn't share their concern.

In an interview with Kaiser Health News earlier this week, Fauci said that Phase Three of the clinical trials could end earlier than expected, if the results prove "overwhelmingly positive."

Fauci told the publication that the Data and Safety Monitoring Board had a "moral obligation" to end the third phase of clinical trials early if the results were significant.

"I'm not concerned about political pressure," he added.

Fully one third of Americans say they would refuse the RNA vaccination even if it was deemed safe by the FDA and distributed to all 50 states before the election.

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Channel 2 Action News

A Black Atlanta woman signed up for Coronavirus vaccine clinical trials to ensure Black people are represented.

Ashley Nealy, 32, applied to participate in late-stage Covid-19 vaccine clinical trials by answering a social media ad looking for diverse volunteers.

Nealy tells Channel 2 Action News anchor Jovita Moore that she felt it was important to make sure the clinical trials were as diverse as possible.

"I actually wanted to do a clinical trial before I even saw the ad. I had registered at the website that Dr. Fauci mentioned, the Covid prevention network, and I never heard a call back. So whenever I saw the ad, I was like, let me just see if they'll accept me for this trial. So I signed up and less than two hours later actually got a call to participate in the trial," Nealy said.

Nealy said she was aware that there aren't enough Black volunteers for the trials and that there cannot be a vaccine product without more Black people. "So I figured that I can put my name in a hat and see if I can help be part of that," she said.

The vaccines contain RNA (Ribonucleic acid) that use specific instructions to tell human cells to produce antibodies against the coronavirus.

The RNA vaccine differs from normal vaccines that contain dead virus particles that trigger the immune system to produce antibodies against a specific pathogen.

RNA vaccines have never been approved for human use before because of the potential for something to go wrong.

What if human cells misread the mRNA instructions and go haywire inside the body?

Nealy says she participated in the trials knowing the RNA vaccine could negatively impact her health.

"This is so that I can help stop the pandemic and make sure that the vaccine works for Black Americans and everyone whenever it comes out," she told Moore.

"You know, so many people will say that they sort of have a mistrust," said Moore. "You're like a guinea pig. You don't know what's going to happen. You don't know what you're being injected with. What would you say to those people who have a real fear or maybe just a lack of interest right now?"

"Yeah, I will say I definitely understand," Nealy responded. "I know Black people in particular have a really long mistrust history with public health and with us being experimented on. And I understand that 100%. I will say if you are willing, and maybe if you're like a guinea pig like me to definitely participate, because we really can't move forward on this pandemic without knowing that a vaccine works for all of us."

Nealy says so far there have been no side effects.

"So actually, the next day after getting the vaccine, I did feel tired. I wasn't expecting to feel that fatigue. And I did have some body aches and sweating. And that was some of the things that they said you might experience if you have the vaccine."

Some volunteers received placebos while others were given the real vaccine.

"And then of course, they can't tell us but I'm pretty sure I did. And those are the only symptoms I had. They only lasted about a day and the next day I was fine," said Nealy.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has asked all 50 states to prepare for massive distributions of Covid-19 vaccines by late October or early November.

Further complicating the vaccination effort is the cold storage requirement and the fact that two vaccine doses will need to be given 2 weeks apart.

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The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has asked states to prepare for massive distributions of Covid-19 vaccines by early November.

Public health officials want the most vulnerable high-risk groups to get the Covid-19 vaccine as soon as late October or early November.

Officials agree that health agencies in all 50 states should "urgently" prepare for a complex effort to distribute the vaccines to "hundreds of millions" of Americans - despite the fact that the death rate is very low.

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The CDC sent guidance to every state on the same day President Trump told the Republican National Convention that a vaccine might be ready before the end of the year.

Over a dozen companies have accelerated clinical trials in a race to get their vaccines to market first. The usual safeguards have been waived in order to get the vaccines to market in a matter of months.

The FDA normally requires three years of clinical trials before a vaccine goes to market.

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The vaccine contains RNA (Ribonucleic acid) that are designed to alter the body's host cells to produce antibodies against the coronavirus.

Unlike normal vaccines, which contain DNA fragments of dead virus to produce antibodies, RNA vaccines are genetically engineered messenger RNA that contain specific directions to alter human DNA and tell it to create proteins, which in turn stimulates the cells to make antibodies.

RNA vaccines don't require dead pathogens to make antibodies. The human host's own genetic code is theoretically supposed to be altered (changed) by the RNA vaccine. RNA vaccines have been used on animals in veterinary medicine for years.

No RNA vaccines have ever been approved for human use.

Dr. Anthony Fauci and and Dr. Stephen Hahn, who heads the Food and Drug Administration, have said in interviews that RNA vaccines should be made readily available for certain groups, i.e. Black people, the elderly over 65, and "those incarcerated", before clinical trials have been completed.

Doctors and nurses on the frontlines will get the vaccines first, according to Fauci.

With so few Black people willing to step up and volunteer to be guinea pigs, the CDC's guidance acknowledged that its distribution plan is "hypothetical".

Dr. Saskia Popescu, an infection prevention epidemiologist based in Arizona, is concerned that the vaccine is highly politicized.

"It's hard not to see this as a push for a pre-election vaccine," he said.

Further complicating the vaccination effort is the cold storage requirement and the fact that two doses will need to be given 2 weeks apart.

"How are you going to make sure people get both [doses]?" said Dr. Cedric Dark, an emergency medicine physician at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas.