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Subway

Most people who order tuna sandwiches from Subway restaurants expect the sandwich to contain some fish in the ingredients.

But a new federal lawsuit claims analysis of Subway tuna sandwiches finds the ingredients do not contain tuna or even fish.

"We found that the ingredients were not tuna and not fish," said one of two attorneys representing two plaintiffs in the lawsuit in an email to The Washington Post.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, claimed the company intentionally made "false and misleading representations about tuna being used as an ingredient."

The lawsuit does not explain what's in the Subway tuna sandwiches.

"As independent testing has repeatedly affirmed, the Products are made from anything but tuna," the lawsuit states. "On the contrary, the Products are made from a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by Defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna."

Subway denied the claims that the sandwiches don't contain real tuna.

According to Subway's website, the tuna sandwich contains "flaked tuna blended with creamy mayo then topped with your choice of crisp, fresh veggies."

"There simply is no truth to the allegations in the complaint that was filed in California," a company spokesperson told DailyMail.com.

"Subway delivers 100 per cent cooked tuna to its restaurants, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches, wraps and salads that are served to and enjoyed by our guests," Subway claimed.

"The taste and quality of our tuna make it one of Subway's most popular products and these baseless accusations threaten to damage our franchisees, small business owners who work tirelessly to uphold the high standards that Subway sets for all of its products, including its tuna.