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Friend of the blog Wendy Williams was roasted on social media after she shaded a TikTok star who was shot to death.

Swavy, real name Matima Miller, was best known for his dance videos and comedy skits on TikTok.

Wendy correctly acknowledged that no one in her studio audience had ever heard of him.

"I have no idea who this person is ... neither does one person in this building," she said.

Someone tweeted out a clip of the segment on Thursday night and Wendy's name trended for the worst possible reason (disrespecting the dead).

The clip garnered millions of views and nearly as many angry comments. Donations poured into a GoFundMe account to raise money for Swavy's funeral expenses.

Trey Smith, who tweeted the clip, wrote: "i don't know what i thought was gonna happen here but it's so far past what i thought was gonna happen here."
 

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A Louisiana girl is the first Black student to win the National Spelling Bee, held on Thursday night in Orlando, Florida.

Zaila Avant-garde, 14, won by correctly spelling the word "murraya," which means a genus of tropical Asiatic and Australian trees.

After spelling the word correctly, Zaila thew up her hands and twirled around as the audience, including First Lady Jill Biden, stood and cheered.

JIM WATSON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Zaila, a basketball prodigy, took up selling as a second hobby. The spelling bee was canceled in 2020 due to the Covid.

The last Black champion was a Jamaican. The spelling bee has been dominated by Asians and other non-Black people of color.

Most of the spelling bee was held virtually, with only 11 finalists able to compete in person, according to the Associated Press.

Zalia took home the spelling bee trophy and more than $50,000 in cash and prizes. The runner-up, was Chaitra Thummala, 12, of Frisco, Texas. Bhavana Madini, 13, from Plainview, New York, finished third.
 

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Buju Banton is warning Caribbean leaders to be careful amid the assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moise on July 7.

The reggae legend claims the United States and other countries have alligned with China to push Covid-19 on the world.

NurPhoto via Getty Images

President Moise, right, was shot multiple times and killed by commandos at the presidential palace in the hills above Port-au-Prince, Haiti. His wife, Martine Moise, left, was wounded in the attack.

The Haitian president was shot 12 times and one of his eyes was gouged out, DailyMail.com reports.

Buju claims President Moise refused to take money from the Chinese government to implement Covid-19 restrictions.

"This guy in Haiti he didn't take no money from the Chinese to sell you guys Covid. He did not bow to money power. Most of you leaders in the Caribbean I guess you are worried now. Guess you are beefing up your security detail cause you have taken money from the Chinese. I wish you luck. I wish you all the luck. I wish you all the best. This is what you get when you make deals with the devil. Moise didn't make any deals with the Chinese. He didn't make any deal to sell his people out and sell the Covid narrative. All you other leaders did you?"

As of June 11, Haiti had a total of 16,079 COVID-19 cases, and a total of 346 Covid-related deaths in a country with a population over 11 million people.

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Former President Donald Trump is suing Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg for violating his constitutional rights to freedom of speech.

Trump's lawsuit accused big tech of banning him from Twitter and Facebook after his supporters attended his rally in the nation's capitol on January 6, 2021.

After the rally ended, a small faction of Trump's supporters broke away and headed over to the Capitol building where Washington DC police let them inside.

Trump's attorneys argued that Dorsey and Zuckerberg violated his First Amendment right to free speech in "illegal, unconstitutional censorship."

"We're demanding an end to the shadow-banning, a stop to the silencing and a stop to the blacklisting, banishing and canceling that you know so well," Mr. Trump said on Wednesday. "I am confident that we will achieve a historic victory for American freedom and at the same time freedom of speech."

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The White House's plan to send volunteers door-to-door to encourage vaccinations is raising concerns in Georgia and other states. Volunteers will knock on doors to encourage unvaccinated Americans to roll up their sleeves.

The White House will concentrate its effort on southern states where the vaccination rates are the lowest.

Nearly 150 million Americans have received at least one Covid-19 mRNA injection. States such as Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia have the lowest vaccination rates in the country.

Just 29% of Mississippi residents are fully vaccinated. While Alabama is a close second with 33% fully vaccinated. Georgia ranks third with 37% vaccinated against the virus that has a 99.7% survival rate.

The volunteers will focus their efforts on Georgia's inner city and rural areas where the vaccination rates are lowest.

Georgia officials raised privacy concerns and fired off a letter to the White House to discourage volunteers from going door-to-door to push vaccine compliance.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene compared the Biden administration's new "medical brown shirts" policy to Nazi-era practices.

"Biden pushing a vaccine that is NOT FDA approved shows covid is a political tool used to control people," she tweeted.

"People have a choice, they don’t need your medical brown shirts showing up at their door ordering vaccinations. You can’t force people to be part of the human experiment."

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A video featuring dozens of people pleading for help after receiving the Covid-19 mRNA vaccines is going viral.

The video features men, women and children of all ages and races who took the shots for a virus with a 99.7% survival rate.

They desperately plead for help after suffering ongoing adverse affects for weeks or months.

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The video features a 12-year-old girl who requires a feeding tube and is in a wheelchair after participating in the vaccine trials for children.

One woman said, "We listened, so we believed that this vaccine was the right thing to do. So, please, trust us and listen to us when we tell you that we are continuing to suffer physically."

Another woman said, "I'm speaking on behalf of my 17 year old daughter. Pfizer, New York, we need help. We need to be heard."

A third woman who didn't want her face to be shown said, "I am afraid to be shown due to the negative consequences some of my fellow sufferers have faced for speaking out. But I need help and we desperately need the medical community to hear us."

All of the vaccine recipients signed waivers acknowledging the potential side effects, including death.

Vaccine recipients can't sue pharmaceutical companies for damages for their pain and suffering.

However, none of them believed the vaccines would adversely affect them and cause anguish and pain.

Insurance doesn't cover their treatment because the vaccines are experimental and the recipients accepted the potential risks.
 

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Black Twitter is mourning the sudden death of journalist and influencer Ayesha K. Faines.

The former traffic anchor at News4Jax died unexpectedly on July 2nd. She was best known as a panelist on the web series The Grapevine Show.

She was also a contributor for MTV, Essence, Entertainment Tonight, Hot 97, and The Michael Baisden Show.

Her cause of death was not made public, however Facebook friends say she took the Covid-19 mRNA injections recently.

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After she was fully vaccinated in April, Faines tweeted:

"I had dinner with a friend for the first time in a year Sunday. Today I visited my opinionated octogenarian seamstress who I haven’t seen since last March. The joy! Actually getting ready to wear clothes OUT again Weary face. Things are NOT normal—but a bit closer."

Faines graduated from Yale University and was a competitive salsa dancer. She taught ballet to preteens and she was the founder of her brand Women Love Power, a digital learning company that helped women develop their sense of self separate from a man.

Black Twitter flooded her timeline with condolences.

One user wrote:

"Ayesha K Faines was a Black woman who organized complex information so anyone could understand.

"She had a great dharma as a teacher & she fulfilled her purpose. She followed her own rules & listened to her internal calling. The loss of this woman will be felt for generations."

Another person wrote:

"Never met Ayesha K. Faines a day in my life but I’ve been following her on twitter for years.

"I always loved and appreciated her wisdom on the Grapevine panels. Such a powerful, beautiful and brilliant woman. Prayers for her family & loved ones. R.I.P"

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Phylicia Rashad is fighting to keep her position as dean at Howard University. Rashad, 73, was heavily criticized after she showed support for her TV husband, Bill Cosby, in an exuberant tweet.

Cosby, 83, was released from prison last week after serving three years of a 3- to 10-year sentence for alleged sexual assault.

Rashad, who starred with the comedian on the TV sitcom "The Cosby Show", tweeted:

"FINALLY!!!! A terrible wrong is being righted- a miscarriage of justice is corrected!"

After facing furious public backlash, Rashad deleted her tweet and backtracked, saying "I fully support survivors of sexual assault".

Liberal officials at woke Howard University pressured Rashad to apologize again after students called for her termination.

Rashad hastily released a lengthy statement, saying her "remarks were in no way directed toward survivors of sexual assault."

Rashad received overwhelming support from her celebrity friends, including singer Stephanie Mills who urged Howard U. to "give back the millions" Cosby donated to the school.

The 64-year-old "Home" singer took to Instagram and wrote:

"I love you @phyliciarashad [heart emojis]. If it's true that Howard University wants to terminate her Position because they feel her comments about Mr. Cosby were insensitive, then they should give back the millions of dollars that he donated to the university."

Mills referred to the millions Cosby donated to Howard in return for an honorary college degree in 1989.

Cosby also donated millions to the all-women Spelman college in Atlanta, Ga.

The former Broadway star is best known for her hit singles "I Have Learned to Respect the Power of Love", "I Feel Good All Over", "(You're Puttin') A Rush on Me" and "Something in the Way (You Make Me Feel)".

She won a Grammy Award for "Never Knew Love Like This Before" (watch her sing live below).
 

 

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Adam Mendelsohn, the longtime adviser to LeBron James, apologized for saying he was "exhausted" by the Black Lives Matter and Me Too movements.

LeBron James is a vocal supporter of Black Lives Matter.

Mendelsohn, who is white, made the remark in a secretly recorded phone call with ESPN anchor Rachel Nichols in July 2020.

At the time, Nichols was under quarantine at a Walt Disney World resort near the NBA bubble in Orlando, as part of the NBA's Covid protocol.

Alone in her room, she used an ESPN video camera to host "The Jump" and appear in ESPN's pregame and post-game shows.

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Nichols, who is white, was upset that Black ESPN anchor Maria Taylor (left) was given the 2020 NBA Finals hosting gig. Nichols felt ESPN bosses were "pressured" due to their "crappy" history on diversity.

At some point during the phone call, Mendelsohn said, "I don't know. I'm exhausted. Between Me Too and Black Lives Matter, I got nothing left." Nichols laughed, apparently in agreement.

Unbeknownst to Nichols, the video camera in her room was still on and recording her phone call with Mendelsohn. The recording was live-streamed to a server at ESPN's headquarters in Bristol, Conn., according to the NY Times.

The audio clip was made public by the New York Times in an in-depth article about the racial rift between Nichols and Taylor that was published on Sunday, July 4.

Mendelsohn has since apologized in a statement to CNBC:

"I made a stupid, careless comment rooted in privilege and I am sincerely sorry. I shouldn't have said it or even thought it. I work to support these movements and know that the people affected by these issues never get to be exhausted or have nothing left. I have to continue to check my privilege and work to be a better ally."

The leaked audio clip confirmed the suspicions of several Black ESPN employees who believe their white colleagues support Black Lives Matter in public but act differently behind closed doors.

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Rapper Busta Rhymes trended on social media after he railed against "weird ass" government Covid-19 mandates during a recent concert gig.

Busta, born Trevor Smith Jr., expressed his opinion during the Seoul Tacos 10th Anniversary Block Party in St. Louis, Missouri in June.

He noted that "you can't even breathe freely," while wearing a face mask. The rapper also said government officials who try to "take our civil liberties away" can "suck a d**k."

Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

Busta and other rappers hit the road after the CDC announced people who are fully vaccinated can go maskless indoors and outdoors.

"This is my second show in front of human life in the last fifteen f**kin' months. COVID can suck a d**k. All these little weird-ass government policies and mandates can suck a d**k. Stop tryin' to take our civil liberties away. It feels good to be back outside, we outside for real."

"It's called the God-given right of freedom, right?" he continued. "No human being supposed to tell you you can't even breathe freely. F**k your mask. I mean I’m sayin', some of y'all might feel differently but, f**k your mask. I can't rhyme to you with a mask on. We can't eat food with a f**king mask on. We can't even see each other smile with a mask on. I come from a time when before i even used to want to holler at a chick, I used to have to do s**t with my face to let her know that I’m into her."

He added:

"All of that energy gets blocked when your mask is on. Energy is important, and we are all conductors of f**kin’ good energy. We also got to be clear when a motherf**ker trying to give you bad energy, you can tell only from the expression on their face. I wanna see the face, f**k your mask. I mean, I'm sorry I gotta go political and s**t, I miss my people, we gotta talk."

Watch the video below.