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Wendy Williams was supposed to get access to her bank accounts in July. But Wells Fargo bank is still freezing her funds, according to her manager Will Selby.

Williams, 58, has been battling the bank for control of her estimated $20 million fortune since January 2022.

A financial guardian was appointed to give Williams a monthly allowance.

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A source close to Williams told The US Sun, "her team has not been paid since these accounts were shut. Her manager is relatively new, but there are people who have been working for her this entire time and they haven't seen a dime since the accounts were closed either."

Williams' accounts were frozen after bank officials claimed she has dementia and she's being exploited by people within her inner circle.

Dementia is a degenerative mental disorder characterized by memory loss and impaired thought processes that affects a person's ability to function and carry out activities of daily living.

Some days are better than others for people who suffer from dementia. Dementia is not a normal part of aging. It is caused by disease or injury to the brain cells.

A wide-eyed Williams recorded a video message promising her Instagram followers she will be back. The former daytime TV host is shopping a deal for a new podcast series.

Watch the video below.

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Wendy Williams is preparing for a legal battle with Wells Fargo Bank after demands to unlock her funds have gone ignored.

On Wednesday, Wendy shared an Instagram photo of herself wearing a faux fur coat and matching Louis Vuitton handbag. She captioned the photo: "Ready for court."

She quickly deleted that image and re-posted the same photo along with the caption: "Ready."

The NY Post wondered if Wendy appeared on court today to take on the banking giant.

The daytime talk show host filed a lawsuit against the bank over her funds, which have been frozen since February.

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Wells Fargo froze Wendy's account containing $3 million after her former financial adviser, Lori Schiller, claimed she was mentally unfit.

Wendy denied the allegations in videos on her Instagram account. In one recent video, Wendy said, "My thing is that I've been asking questions about my money and when I begin asking questions about my money, suddenly Lori Schiller has got no response regarding my money. I want my money. This is not fair."

"Wells Fargo has no questions and answers regarding my money. This is not fair. And Lori Schiller and Wells Fargo has this guardianship petition about keeping me away from my money," she added.

"This is not right and this is not fair," she repeated.

While Williams' lawsuit against Wells Fargo has been sealed by a New York judge.

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Wendy Williams has given a representative Power of Attorney to help her gain access to her frozen account at Wells Fargo Bank.

Wendy, 57, says Wells Fargo froze her bank account containing over $3 million after her former accountant told bank officials she had dementia and was being taken advantage of by others.

According to RhymeswithSnitch, bank officials told Wendy's reps they would give her access to the funds after she provided them with a "properly executed, witnessed, and notarized Power of Attorney and signed letter of representation."

A Power of Attorney gives an individual the right to make business, personal and legal decisions about another person's property, finances, or medical care when the person is ruled mentally or physically unfit.

DARA / BACKGRID

Wendy argued in court papers that she is not incapacitated and the bank "repeatedly denied" her requests to access her funds for two weeks.

She wrote:

"I have submitted multiple written requests to Wells Fargo and I have visited various Wells Fargo branches in the South Florida area in an effort to resolve this matter outside of the courtroom."

Wendy has been out of work since July of 2021 after suffering COVID complications. She is reportedly down to her last several million dollars and is in serious debt.

"I have defaulted and I am at risk of defaulting on several billing and financial obligations, including, but not limited to, mortgage payments and employee payroll," Wendy wrote.

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Wendy Williams is threatening to file a lawsuit after Wells Fargo froze an account holding "several million dollars' worth of funds."

Wells Fargo allegedly froze the accounts after Wendy's former accountant informed the bank that she was suffering from dementia and was not oriented to reality.
 
RELATED: Wendy Williams suffering from dementia: ‘She doesn’t recognize friends’
 

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Wendy, 57, hasn't worked since July of 2021 and she is reportedly down to her last several million dollars.

She's allegedly desperate to gain access to the cash because she is behind on her rent for her Manhattan condo and has other outstanding bills.

An attorney representing the queen of daytime talk is asking the court for an emergency order forcing Wells Fargo to unfreeze her accounts.

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In court documents obtained by The Sun UK, Wendy's attorney stated Wells Fargo is in "possession of several million dollars' worth of funds," belonging to Wendy, and she has been denied access to her funds for more than two-weeks.

Wells Fargo justified its action by claiming Wendy signed an agreement allowing her accounts to be frozen pending a court order, if the bank suspects "financial exploitation, dementia, or undue influence."

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However, Wendy's attorney claims the bank has overreached its authority, and he is seeking a judge's order allowing "access to her financial accounts, assets, and statements," while her dispute with Wells Fargo is resolved in arbitration.

The court docs allege that Wells Fargo is in breach of their fiduciary duty and that Wendy is suffering "imminent and irreparable financial damage."

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Netflix has shifted $100 million to Black banks to follow through on its commitment to close the equity gap.

Netflix's co-CEO Ted Sarandos (2nd from right) is married to Nicole Avant (right), daughter of music legend Clarence Avant (left) and Jacqueline Avant (2nd from left).

Mrs. Avant, 81, was killed during a home invasion in Beverly Hills on Wednesday.

Netflix moved 2 percent of its cash holdings, $100 million, to Black banks to address systemic racism, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The Black financial institutions include Hope Credit Union, the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), The Change Company, Enterprise Community Impact Note, OneUnited Bank and Calvert Impact Capital's Community Investment Note.

Netflix's goal is to improve systemic racism that prevents Black-owned businesses from getting loans, especially those impacted by the pandemic.

"Because we pegged our commitment to 2 percent of Netflix’s cash, the investment also grows overtime [sic]. So we will be 'topping up' our commitment at the end of the year and moving more cash — over and above the $100 million already committed — into these institutions," Netflix's Aaron Mitchell and Shannon Alwyn wrote in a Dec. 1 post.

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New Jersey Governor Phil Murray announced Saturday he is working with major banks and mortgage lenders to extend a 90-day grace period to residents who are financially impacted by the coronavirus.

Murray announced he is working with Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Chase, and more than 40 other banking institutions and lenders to establish a grace period for mortgages.

In a follow-up tweet, Murray urged banks and landlords to "do the right thing" by not evicting their tenants who can't afford to stay in their homes.

"I urge, and expect, our financial institutions and credit card companies to do the right thing in all areas of their business," he wrote.

"That also means lowering credit card interest rates to reflect the reality many families are living, to waive late fees, and exercise compassion. To every landlord -- now is a time to show some compassion, and to work with your renters to ensure they stay safe. You cannot convict anyone at this time. If you try to, we're not going to take that lightly, and we will male an example out of you for violating the law."

He added:

"This grace period CANNOT and WILL NOT be used to downgrade anyone’s credit rating. Lenders will also waive any late fees, or other costs which would otherwise arise, because of this 90-day grace period."

But not all New Jersey residents are appreciative of the governor's efforts to protect those less fortunate.

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A Detroit man is suing a bank for calling the police when he went to deposit settlement checks from a race discrimination lawsuit.

Sauntore Thomas, 44, alleges TCF Bank accused him of check fraud because the bank couldn't verify checks he tried to deposit as part of his lawsuit settlement.

Thomas, who is Black, received an undisclosed amount from Enterprise Rent a Car to settle a May 2018 lawsuit.

He filed a lawsuit on Wednesday after what he calls a "hellish experience" being questioned by police in front of bank customers - while two more Detroit police officers guarded the door outside, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Thomas is seeking unspecified damages and an apology from TCF Bank. The bank claims it was only following protocol when there is a large deposit made.

The bank filed a police report alleging Thomas committed bank fraud. TCF Bank claims the watermark on the checks indicated the checks were fraudulent.

Thomas wasn't arrested and no charges were filed, the NY Daily News reported.

A spokesperson from the Livonia Police Department told the Free Press that the checks could not be verified because they weren't payroll checks.

An emailed copy of the settled lawsuit from Thomas' attorney, Deborah Gordon, didn't resolve the dispute, nor did conversations with Gordon, the cops and bank personnel.

"Obviously, assumptions were made the minute he walked in based on his race," attorney Gordon told the Free Press.

"It's unbelievable that this guy got done with a race discrimination case and he's not allowed to deposit the checks based on his case? It's absolutely outrageous."

Gordon, who is Caucasian, said "banking while Black" should not have been viewed as a crime.

"This is just another classic example of what it's like living your life as a Black male," she told BuzzFeed News. "The checks are for real. Why was there an issue? Why could you not verify them? You're a bank, after all - it's your job to verify checks."

The bank issued a swift apology for the experience Thomas had at their banking center. "Local police should not have been involved. We strongly condemn racism and discrimination of any kind," TCF Bank said in a statement to the Free Press.

"We take extra precautions involving large deposits and requests for cash and in this case, we were unable to validate the checks presented by Mr. Thomas and regret we could not meet his needs."

Thomas closed his account at TCF Bank and deposited the checks at another bank - where they cleared in 12 hours.

"I want to be vindicated," Thomas told the Free Press. He said he feared being arrested that day because he knows what happens to men with dark skin who don't toe the line.

"I feel very intimidated because I knew that if I would have gotten loud, they would have had me on the ground for disturbance of the peace," he said.

"I didn't give them any type of indication that I was getting upset. I wanted to make sure I stayed as levelheaded as possible, because I wasn't going to be the next person on the ground saying, 'I can't breathe.'"

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A former bank employee is accused of stealing more than $88,000 from a North Carolina bank, then posting photos of the stolen loot on social media.

Arlando Henderson, 29, was arrested by the FBI in San Diego, California on Dec. 4. A criminal indictment was unsealed in federal court in Charlotte, NC following his arrest.

According to the indictment, Henderson was employed by the financial institution in Charlotte, and had access to the bank vault.

On 18 separate occasions, Henderson stole cash from customer deposit boxes in the bank's vault.

Henderson then posted photos of himself flashing the cash on social media. Henderson reportedly used the cash for personal expenses and to make a $20,000 down payment on a new Mercedes-Benz.

The indictment also alleges Henderson committed fraud by falsifying documents to obtain a car loan at another bank for the balance owed on the Mercedes.

Bank officials became suspicious after Henderson - by then an ex-employee - posted photos of himself flashing stacks of cash on his Facebook and Instagram accounts.

The aspiring rapper also posted photos of himself posing next to a white 2019 Mercedes-Benz.

Henderson captioned one photo: "I make it look easy but this... really a PROCESS."

"Throughout July and August 2019, Henderson used a social media account to post several pictures of him holding large stacks of cash," the indictment reads.

The feds allege Henderson "destroyed certain documents" and "made, or caused others to make, false entries in the bank's books and records to cover up the thefts."

Henderson had an initial appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Gallo, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California earlier this month.

He is charged with two counts of financial institution fraud, 19 counts of theft, embezzlement and misapplication, and 12 counts of making false entries.

The felony charges carry a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine for each count. He is also charged with transactional money laundering, which carries additional penalties of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
 

Copyright Disclaimer: I do not own the rights to the photograph(s) used in this post. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use” of photographs for purposes such as parody, criticism, commentary, news reporting, education, and research.

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A Pennsylvania couple is out on bond after they spent $100,000 of $120,000 deposited into their bank account accidentally.

Robert and Tiffany Williams, of Montoursville, Pa., found the $120,000 in their bank account and forgot to call the bank.

$120,000 intended for a business was accidentally transferred into their BB&T bank account because of a teller error, state trooper Aaron Brown told the Williamsport Sun-Gazette.

Brown said the couple went on a spending spree - knowing the money in the bank account wasn't theirs to spend.

The Williamses bought a camper, a Chevy and a racecar before giving $15,000 to their broke friends.

They spent a total of $100,000 in about 2½ weeks, WNEP reports.

The bank eventually realized the error and notified Tiffany Williams, 35, that she had X amount of days to return the cash, Brown told the Sun-Gazette.

Brown said the withdrawal resulted in a $107,416 overdraft because the couple had only $1,121 in their bank account.

Williams agreed to pay back the money if the bank put her on a payment plan.

The bank agreed to the payment plan, but Williams stopped making the payments and refused to return the bank's calls or emails.

The bank pressed charges and the couple was arrested and charged with three felony counts of theft by receiving.

The Sun-Gazette reported that the couple, in separate interrogations, told police that they "admitted to knowing the mislaid money did not belong to them, but they spent it anyway."

They appeared in court last week and posted bail of $25,000 each, according to The Washington Post.

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