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Don Lemon expressed his shock that Meghan Markle passed as a mixed woman until she began dating Britain's Prince Harry.

In an interview with Mariah Carey on her Spotify podcast, Meghan said she passed as "mixed" until she started dating her future husband.

"And I think, for us it's so different because we're light-skinned," she told Mariah.

"You're not treated as a Black woman. You're not treated as a white woman, you sort of fit in between. I mean, if there's any time in my life that it's been more focused on my race, it's only once I started dating my husband. Then I started to understand what it was like to be treated like a Black woman. Because up until then, I had been treated like a mixed woman. And things really shifted."

Meghan said her mixed race privilege meant she "did not have to deal with racism" until she married Prince Harry.

Lemon was shocked that Meghan didn't understand the Black experience until she married a white man.

"I commend Meghan Markle for going there, even though it is a bit shocking that at 30-some years of age, she is just understanding what it's like to be a black woman in America," Lemon told his fellow co-anchors on Wednesday morning.

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Meghan's mother Doria Ragland is Black. Her father Thomas Markle is Caucasian. No one from her father's side of the family attended her royal wedding in 2018.

Watch the video below.
 

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Meghan Markle says she was not treated as a Black woman in America until she began dating Britain's Prince Harry.

The Duchess of Sussex interviewed American pop singer Mariah Carey in the latest episode of her No. 1 ranked Spotify podcast "Archetypes."

Archetypes shot to number 1 two days after it dropped, replacing "The Joe Rogan Experience" as the top podcast on Spotify in America on Thursday.

Meghan, 41, and Mariah, 53, spoke about their shared experiences as biracial women growing up in America.

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"I didn't fit in. I didn't fit in," said Mariah, who moved with her family over a dozen times as a child. She is pictured with rapper Jay Z in a photo dated January 27, 2018.

"You know, it would be more of the Black area of town or then you could be where my mom chose to live, were the more, the white neighborhoods. And I didn't fit in anywhere at all," Mariah said.

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"Yeah, I understand that," Meghan said, adding that she looked forward to welcoming Mariah on her podcast because they looked like each other.

"You were so formative for me. Representation matters so much," Meghan said.

"But when you are a woman and you don't see a woman who looks like you somewhere in a position of power or influence, or even just on the screen — because we know how influential media is — you came onto the scene, I was like 'Oh, my gosh. Someone kind of looks like me.'"

Meghan said she was also inspired by biracial Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry, who couldn't easily pass as white because her skin was dark.

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"I had read this article about Halle Berry, and they were asking her how she felt being treated as a mixed-race woman in the world. And her response was her saying, 'Well, your experience through the world is how people view you.' So she said because she was darker in color, she was being treated as a Black woman, not as a mixed woman."

"And I think for us, it's very different because we're light-skinned," Meghan added. "You're not treated as a Black woman. You're not treated as a white woman. You sort of fit in between."

Meghan enjoyed her privilege as a white woman in America, until she began dating Prince Harry.

"I mean, if there's any time in my life that it's been more focused on my race, it's only once I started dating my husband. Then I started to understand what it was like to be treated like a Black woman. Because up until then, I had been treated like a mixed woman. And things really shifted."

Listen to the podcast below.

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Keke Palmer (L) dismissed comparisons to fellow actress Zendaya Coleman, who many believe is paid more than Palmer because of her skin color.

Palmer responded after a tweet comparing the "Nope" star to Zendaya went viral over the weekend.

The tweet read:

"I'd like someone to do a deep-drive on the similarities and differences between Keke Palmer and Zendaya's careers. This may be one of the clearest examples of how colorism plays out in Hollywood. They were both child-stars, but their mainstream popularity is very different."

Palmer is Black, while Zendaya is biracial.

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Palmer, 28, whose movie "Nope" opened with $44 million at the box office, responded.

"A great example of colorism is to believe I can be compared to anyone. I'm the youngest talk show host ever. The first Black woman to star in her own show on Nickelodeon, & the youngest & first Black Cinderella on broadway. I'm an incomparable talent. Baby, THIS, is Keke Palmer."

She continued:

"I've been a leading lady since I was 11 years old. I have over 100+ credits, and currently starring in an original screenplay that's the number one film at the box office #NOPE. I've had a blessed career thus far, I couldn't ask for more but God continues to surprise me."

Palmer, who made her acting debut in Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004), is also a singer/songwriter who has released 2 studio albums, three EPs, three mixtapes and 28 singles.

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Zendaya, 25, who starred in 2021's "Spider-Man: No Way Home", did not respond to the controversy.

She became the youngest actress to win an Emmy for outstanding lead actress in a drama series in 2020 for her role in the TV series "Euphoria."

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Actress Thandie Newton broke down in tears while discussing the privilege and advantages she has over darker skinned actresses in Hollywood.

"I've wanted so desperately to apologize every day to darker skinned actresses, to say I'm sorry that I'm the one chosen," she said.

She said her "internalized prejudice" convinced her that she could play a dark-skinned woman on the big screen.

"I just thank God that my light skin didn't stop that from happening. I'm so, you know, that it didn't cause more pain," she said, while choking back tears.

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She added:

"My mama looks like you. It's been very painful to have women that look like my mum feel like I'm not representing them; that I'm taking from them — taking their men, taking their worth, taking their truth... We matter. I was worried about my light-skinnedness, because my light-skinnedness has been more problematic than being Black in my life, literally."

She continued: "I was BLACK in England — I mean dark-skinned. So then I went to America and I would describe myself as dark-skinned."

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Thandie was surprised when Black Americans told her she was light-skinned, not Black.

"And suddenly I was someone that, you know, 'F**k you for being light-skinned.' I got more prejudice from Black people. I didn't understand. I literally didn't understand. I thought you're my brethren? What's happening?"

Watch the video below.
 

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Paula Patton opened up about her racial identity in a sit-down interview with SiriusXM's "The Clay Cane Show."

Paula, whose mother is white and father is Black, says she's "grateful" for her mother, but the term "biracial" offends her sensibilities.

"I find [the term] biracial offensive. It's a way for people to separate themselves from African Americans, a way of saying, 'I'm better than that,'" She told Cane.

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"That's not to say that I don't embrace my mother and everything that she's brought to my life, but it was my mother who let me know, 'The world is going [to] see you as Black and that is who you are. So don't have any questions about that."

Paula continued:

"I'm very grateful for her... The politics of race in our country are such that when [some]one wants to make it very clear that they're not Black, it's a way to keep them separate from Black people. We know, we've had a long history in this country of it not being popular to be Black, to be honest with you. I've always found that to be an offensive term. I'm Black and I embrace it, that's my family."

Paula reprises her role as entertainment attorney Daniella Hernandez in The BET+ series "Sacrifice," which is streaming now.

Watch the interview below.
 

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Rachel Lindsay, left, claims ESPN host Sage Steele was "thrilled" when she didn't choose a Black man on ABC's "Bachelorette."

Lindsay made the remarks on the Higher Learning podcast with co-host, former TMZ staffer Van Lathan.

Lindsay, 36, hinted that Steele, 48, is a bourgeois biracial who is only Black when it's convenient for her.

Lindsay, who is Black, said the incident occurred about 4 years ago when she met Steele at ESPN. She said the encounter with Steele left her feeling like she was in the Twilight Zone.

"I like Sage," said Lindsay, adding that Steele is "problematic".

"She's a woman of color who had a long career in the media and I'm aspiring to this but then I'm listening to you and the first thing you say to me is how thrilled you are that I didn't choose Black. And I'm like… who is this woman?. Since then I've started to learn more about how problematic she can be."

Lindsay shared a video clip on Twitter. She captioned the video: "Y'all want to hear about the first time I met #SageSteele? #TrueStory."

Steele was temporarily suspended from ESPN's SportsCenter over comments she made about former President Barack Obama's race. She also disparaged ESPN's parent company Disney's vaccine mandate, calling it "sick" and "scary."

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Sage Steele went viral over the weekend for comments she made about Barack Obama's father.

The ESPN anchor made the remarks on Jay Cutler's podcast.

The mixed-race ESPN host said Obama choosing "Black" on the census was "fascinating" since "his Black dad was nowhere to be found" and he was raised by his white mother and grandmother.

Steele, 48, also touched on the controversial statement she made about Disney enforcing the vaccine mandate at ESPN.

Steele previously slammed Disney's "sick" and "scary" vaccine mandate.

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Steele also said she respects Black conservative activist Candace Owens after Cutler called her the "Candace Owens of ESPN".

"I respect the hell out of Candace Owens," Steele said, "because, whether you agree or not, she doesn't give a crap what you think."

Steele said the worst racism she ever experienced was from Black people.

Steele, a single mother-of-three, is paying alimony to ex-husband Jonathan Bailey whom she divorced in 2019.

Watch the full interview below.
 

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Now that the Covid-19 outbreak is nearly over, Hollywood has gone into overdrive producing movies and television projects.

One upcoming project about racial identity is sure to have tongues wagging.

For three years, Rebecca Hall had been struggling to find financing for her racial identity movie, Passing.

The movie's premise -- about minority women passing as white -- was considered too controversial.

In 2018, Hall approached producing partners Nina Yang Bongiovi and Forest Whitaker, who had financially backed other films. They were blown away by Hall's script and decided to back her directorial debut.

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The film — starring Tessa Thompson (right) and Ruth Negga — is shot in black-and-white. It will have its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 30.

Thompson and Negga, who are both mixed race, explained why now is the perfect time for a film about women embracing their mixed-race heritage.

"As a British woman of Welsh and Nigerian parentage, I was struck by how resonant and contemporary the theme of Passing still is," Thompson said. "Even in this moment as some of the old binaries break down or become more fluid, others remain stubbornly resistant."

Negga added: "Being a mixed-race person, I think that it naturally informed Clare. Feelings of perhaps alienation, of being different, about trying to find your place. But it's very hard for me to find distinct experiences. And even if I did, I'm not sure if I'd be comfortable articulating them because I think sometimes that's one's personal journey to a character, really."

In a 2018 interview with Deadline, director Hall, who is also mixed race, said, "I came across the novel at a time when I was trying to reckon creatively with some of my personal family history, and the mystery surrounding my bi-racial grandfather on my American mother's side. In part, making this film is an exploration of that history, to which I've never really had access."

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Mariah Carey is still upset after being called "ni**erish" by comedian Sandra Bernhard during a 1998 comedy routine.

The pop singer told Naomi Campbell about the controversial moment from Sandra's standup comedy special I'm Still Here... Damn It!, when the comedienne accused Mariah of exploiting her biracial ethnicity to further her career.

"She's trying to backtrack on our asses by acting real ni**erish there at the Royalton Hotel suite with Puff Daddy and all the greasy, chain-wearing Black men," Bernhard said during her TV special.

Mariah told Naomi: "I wish I would have called you back when it happened because I was so upset and nobody came to my rescue at that point. But whatever, I can't – it's ignorance."

Naomi called Bernhard's insult "rude and disrespectful" as well as being "completely racist".

"People can be very hurtful," Naomi said, "but one of the things that hurt me, because I care about you and I care about the past, was what Sandra said. I was just like, 'Are you for real?' How did that even slide by?" she continued.

Gesturing at Mariah, who is biracial, Naomi added: "You are Black. You have every right. You are working also, in a professional capacity. I just felt like, now, I wanted to clear that up because I was p**sed."

Mariah is the daughter of former opera singer Patricia, of Irish descent, and Alfred, an aeronautical engineer of Black and Afro-Venezuelan descent.

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Black Twitter's cancel culture has claimed another high-profile victim. Doja Cat saw her fame and career tumble overnight after video leaked that showed her in an "alt-right" chat room using racial slurs with white supremacists.

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The biracial singer, rapper and songwriter is best known for her hit song "Mooo!" that went viral in 2018.

Doja Cat was trending on Twitter.com on Friday after video leaked showing the 24-year-old in a chat room with a group of white supremacists and nazi sympathizers.

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In the video, Doja is seen flirting with the white men. At one point she blurts out "ni**er" while the men laugh. Doja, whose mother is Jewish-American, seemed comfortable using racial slurs.

After the clip began doing the rounds online, fans also dug up one of her songs, believed to be from 2015, entitled "Dindu Nuffin" - which is known to be a racial slur for Black criminals, who claim to be innocent after facing police brutality.

She sings on the track: "How much nothing can a dindu do / If a dindu, dindu nothin' / How much money could a dindu make / If a dindu did all the things that you wish to."

Some believe that the song was targeted at Sandra Bland, a Black woman who died in police custody in 2015.

Accusations of her alleged history of racism have resulted in the hashtag #DojaIsOverParty, which quickly started trending on Twitter.

In a recent interview, Doja Cat said she has never met her father, Dumisani Dlamini, a South African actor, choreographer and film producer, best known for Sarafina!
 

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ABC's new scripted series "mixed-ish" got off to a good start in its television premiere on September 24, 2019. The series, about mixed race children who strive to fit in with their Black counterparts, is a spin-off of ABC's black-ish.

mixed-ish topped black-ish in the TV ratings with a 0.8 rating and 4 million viewers. black-ish, which follows mixed-ish at 9:30 p.m., dipped slightly with a 0.8 and 3.52 million viewers.

mixed-ish is the brainchild of black-ish star and executive producer Tracee Ellis Ross, the 46-year-old biracial daughter of R&B icon Diana Ross and her ex-husband Robert Silberstein.

Ross plays Bow, short for Rainbow, on black-ish. Newcomer Arica Himmel plays 12-year-old Bow on mixed-ish.

In the third episode of mixed-ish, titled "Let Your Hair Down," young Bow struggles with her decision to keep her natural curls or straighten her hair with a relaxer to fit in easier with the Black girls at school.

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In a recent interview with TV Guide, Ross says she wanted to do an episode on her loosely curled hair.

"I always say I could chronicle my journey of self-acceptance through my journey with my hair," Ross told TV Guide via phone.

"There is a breadth of story, a narrative, in black women and our hair — and that specific part of that community that is mixed women and what that means as you navigate two different cultures, both in your household and out in the world. I knew that when mixed-ish got picked up and we knew what was happening, I was really strong about the fact that we needed to do [a hair episode] and do it early on in the season. It's one of those stories that is so specifically of the mixed experience."

Bow's younger brother, Johan (Ethan Childress), also has issues with his hair that isn't tightly coiled enough to have the same haircut as his favorite Black rappers, and too textured to style like the popular white kids in school.