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The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said it erroneously published guidance that indicated COVID-19 was "airborne."

The CDC in Atlanta claimed it originally published the guidance "in error", following "a pressure campaign" from the World Health Organization (WHO).

Health organizations absurdly claimed the virus can linger in the air for hours and travel 26 feet.

The new CDC update confirms the virus doesn't linger in a viral cloud that infects people who walk through it.

On Monday, the CDC updated its website to reflect that the "virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person" in close contact with each other.

The CDC's stunning reversal helps explain why a so-called "deadly" virus doesn't sicken a majority of people who are infected.

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Vivica A. Fox and Giuliana Rancic both pulled out of hosting the Emmys virtual red carpet event on Sunday night after testing positive for COVID-19.

The 56-year-old Kill Bill actress and Rancic, 46, were slated to co-host E! TV's Live From the Red Carpet show, but both released statements just before the special went live, explaining they had contracted the coronavirus.

"I am terribly sorry I cannot be with my E! family tonight!" Vivica wrote. "Unfortunately, I have tested positive for the coronavirus. So, in an abundance of caution I am isolating myself at home. During these unprecedented times, it's more important than ever that we follow all safety and health rules and guidelines to protect ourselves and each other."

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Rancic added: "As part of E! and NBCUniversal's very strict testing guidelines, especially before an event like this, I did find out that I tested positive for COVID-19.

"Now as much as I didn't want to hear that, I'm very thankful I heard it before I traveled and possibly could have exposed other people. So for that, I'm thankful... Take good care and I'll see you on the next red carpet."

Like most celebrities who use the coronavirus for PR, neither Vivica nor Giuliana are sick, but both claim to have "mild" symptoms.

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Nashville, Tennessee officials concealed "extremely low" coronavirus cases coming from bars and restaurants in leaked emails, according to WZTV.

The leaked emails between a senior adviser to Nashville's mayor and a health department official reveal a "disturbing effort" to conceal the low number of coronavirus cases among people who patronize bars and restaurants without wearing masks or face coverings.

"On June 30th, contact tracing was giving a small view of coronavirus clusters. Construction and nursing homes causing problems more than a thousand cases traced to each category, but bars and restaurants reported just 22 cases," according to one leaked email obtained by WZTV.

In the same email chain, Leslie Waller from the health department asks "This isn't going to be publicly released, right? Just info for Mayor's Office?"

"Correct, not for public consumption," writes senior advisor Benjamin Eagles.

In another email exchange, Tennessee reporter Nate Rai asked the health department to clarify the low number of COVID cases coming from bars and restaurants.

"If there have been over 20,000 positive cases of COVID-19 in Davidson and only 80 or so are traced to restaurants and bars, doesn't that mean restaurants and bars aren’t a very big problem?"

His query left health department official Brian Todd scrambling for a suitable response.

He asked five other health officials: "Please advise how you respond. BT."

The response from an official whose name was redacted from the leaked email:

"My two cents. We have certainly refused to give counts per bar because those numbers are low per site. We could still release the total though, and then a response to the over 80 could be "because that number is increasing all the time and we don't want to say a specific number.""

For months now, conservatives have accused health officials of over-exaggerating the coronavirus pandemic to keep Americans on lockdown until after the November elections.

Atlanta has fully reopened after a 3-month lockdown. Every bar and nightclub within the Atlanta city limits is packed with patrons who don't wear masks or social distance.

There has not been a spike in coronavirus cases coming from bars and restaurants in Atlanta.

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Cardi B's ill-advised marriage to promiscuous rapper Offset appears to be over. The "Bodak Yellow" rapper filed divorce papers in a Fulton County, Georgia court on Tuesday, according to Page Six.

The couple wed almost three years ago to the day and shares a two-year-old daughter, Kulture. A hearing has been set for November 4.

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According to a confidential source who has vast knowledge of this matter: Covid-19 is the reason behind the divorce action.

The source said the couple realized they weren’t marriage material during the lockdown. They discovered they have totally different personalities. Also, the lockdown made it harder for Offset to communicate with his Atlanta side piece.

With no club dates and no tours, Cardi and Offset were faced with the difficult task of getting to know each other without distractions at home.

They quickly discovered their 22,000 sq. ft. leased Buckhead mansion was not big enough for the 2 of them.

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The source said Cardi was adamant that Offset take the passwords off his phones. "What are you hiding?!" was a familiar refrain in their home.

The couple's marriage hit a wall when Cardi accused the Migos star of cheating on her, but she decided to save their marriage, telling Vogue last year, "When me and my husband got into our issues - you know, he cheated and everything - and I decided to stay with him and work together with him, a lot of people were so mad at me; a lot of women felt disappointed in me, but it's real-life s**t.

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"If you love somebody and you stop being with them, and you're depressed and social media is telling you not to talk to that person because he cheated, you're not really happy on the inside until you have the conversation."

The ex-couple do not have a prenup in place. Cardi may be forced to pay Offset spousal support.
 

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NFL wide receiver Josh Bellamy is among 57 people charged with Covid-19 relief fraud after FBI officials say he misused PPP funds to buy Gucci and other high end luxury goods.

The Paycheck Protection Program is part of the $2 trillion Cares Act, which provided $349 billion in PPP loans to struggling small businesses amid the coronavirus pandemic via the Small Business Association (SBA).

The FBI says Bellamy participated in a scheme to fleece the federal government out of $24 million in Paycheck Protection funds.

Bellamy, 31, was cut by the NY Jets 2 days ago. It isn't clear if his termination is linked to his arrest.

Prosecutors say Bellamy and his associates applied for $24 million in PPP funds for their businesses. They received $17.4 million - but neither Bellamy nor his associates used the money for their businesses.

Instead, Bellamy spent $95,000 on custom jewelry, $5,381 at Gucci and $2,014 at Dior. He also dropped more than $62,000 during a recent trip to the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, TMZ reported.

Authorities say Bellamy recruited others to apply for giant loans using false information -- then took kickbacks from each borrower.

Bellamy owns Drip Entertainment - an events promotion company - that hasn't been active since 2019.

Bank records show Bellamy withdrew large amounts of cash - around $302,000 between May and July 2020.

If convicted on all charges, Bellamy faces decades in prison.

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LG, makers of flat screen televisions and other electronics, has developed a high tech mask that moves air in and out more efficiently than a cloth mask.

The death toll for the coronavirus is well below 1% in the United States. Despite this, millions of Americans are required to wear face masks or face coverings.

For many Americans, face masks are not an option due to health, personal and political reasons. In lieu of wearing masks, they wash their hands and avoid touching their faces.

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The battery-operated LG PuriCare mask debuted at a consumer electronics trade show in Berlin last week. The air purifier mask has built-in fans and replaceable H13 HEPA filters.

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Screengrab: YouTube

A respiratory sensor detects how much air the wearer inhales and exhales and adjusts the fans accordingly.

The air purifier mask is large and bulky and the air intake fans may be annoying for autists who are noise intolerant.

LG Electronics doesn't make any claims that the mask will block the virus 100%. The Covid-19 viral particles are extremely tiny and can easily pass through disposable face masks and ventilator masks.

The air purifier mask simply makes breathing easier for those who feel safer wearing a mask but have difficulty breathing through disposable masks.

The LG PuriCare masks are not available to consumers yet. LG must secure regulatory approval from many governments before the masks go to market.

LG recently donated 2,000 units to a hospital in Seoul, Korea.
 

 

No products or compensation were received in exchange for this post.

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Journalist Bob Woodward claims President Donald Trump downplayed the seriousness of the coronavirus during a phone call.

In February, Trump spoke to Woodward who was doing research for his latest book, Rage. Woodward claimed Trump downplayed the threat of the coronavirus at the time to prevent the public from panicking.

Democrats reacted with outrage to the leaked audio, saying Trump "intentionally" mislead the general public about the virus that originated in Wuhan, China in December.

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On the campaign trail in Michigan, Joe Biden told auto workers that Trump "lied" about the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic, saying Trump's admission was "a life and death betrayal of the American people."

But Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the White Task Force on the coronavirus, told Fox News: "I don't think [Trump] ever distorted things that I spoke to him about."

Fauci added: "I don't think he said much different than what we said [to him] when we were in the Oval Office."

The White House Task Force held daily press briefings and Fauci even predicted that "millions" of Americans would die from the virus.

On Jan. 30, Trump told his supporters at a rally in Des Moines, Iowa, "We're working with China just so you know, and other countries very, very closely, so it doesn't get out of hand, but it's something that we have to be very, very careful with, right? We have to be very careful.

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A Phase 3 vaccine developed by drug manufacturer AstraZeneca was put on hold when a volunteer in the UK fell ill after suffering a "serious adverse reaction" to the vaccine.

The vaccine being developed by drug manufacturer AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford in England was put on hold after a UK participant experienced a "serious adverse reaction".

The adverse reaction was described only as an "unexplained illness" in one of the trials.

A spokesperson for AstraZeneca, the frontrunner in the race for the first Covid-19 RNA vaccine, said in a statement on Tuesday that the company's "standard review process triggered a pause" to allow for a "review of safety data."

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Another source within the company, who spoke to Statnews.com on condition of anonymity, said the adverse reaction is having an impact on other AstraZeneca vaccine trials, as well as clinical trials being conducted by different vaccine manufacturers.

Nine drug manufacturers have vaccine studies currently under way in the U.S. and abroad.

The U.S. is currently testing vaccines at 62 sites across the country, according to clinicaltrials.gov.

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AstraZeneca's clinical trial is the first to reach the critical Phase 3 stage - the final step before the vaccine gets FDA approval. The normal timeframe for clinical trials is three years.

Adverse reactions to vaccines that require hospitalization may include life-threatening illness and even death.

Doctors in the U.S. are concerned that the vaccines are being rushed to market without adequate time to determine side effects.

Although healthcare professionals are due to get the vaccines first, many doctors and nurses say they will decline to take a vaccination that is rushed to market -- particularly since the Covid death rate is way below 1%.

Fully one third of Americans say they will refuse the vaccine if one is available before the election in November.

News of the adverse reaction sent AstraZeneca's stock tumbling 8% in after hours trading on Tuesday.

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Kamala Harris refuses to say whether she would take the RNA vaccine if it becomes available in October or November.

President Trump has insisted a vaccine will be available by the end of the year, and potentially before the November 3 elections.

"It will be delivered before the end of the year, in my opinion, before the end of the year, but it really might even be delivered before the end of October," Trump said Thursday. "How do you like that? Wouldn't that be nice?"

But the Democratic vice presidential candidate said she doesn't trust Trump's word on the safety or efficacy of a vaccine that was rushed through three years' worth of clinical trials in a matter of months.

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In an interview with CNN, Harris said, "I would not trust Donald Trump and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he's talking about. I will not take his word for it."

Alarm bells went off when the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent letters to governors in every state requesting that states consider "waiving requirements" to allow vaccine distribution sites to be fully operational by November 1st.

Unlike normal vaccines, RNA vaccines are "encoded" with genetic "instructions" that tell your cells what to do.

Many Americans expressed concern that the CDC might be subjecting them to a potentially harmful vaccine.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who sits on the White House Coronavirus Task Force, doesn't share their concern.

In an interview with Kaiser Health News earlier this week, Fauci said that Phase Three of the clinical trials could end earlier than expected, if the results prove "overwhelmingly positive."

Fauci told the publication that the Data and Safety Monitoring Board had a "moral obligation" to end the third phase of clinical trials early if the results were significant.

"I'm not concerned about political pressure," he added.

Fully one third of Americans say they would refuse the RNA vaccination even if it was deemed safe by the FDA and distributed to all 50 states before the election.

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A Black Atlanta woman signed up for Coronavirus vaccine clinical trials to ensure Black people are represented.

Ashley Nealy, 32, applied to participate in late-stage Covid-19 vaccine clinical trials by answering a social media ad looking for diverse volunteers.

Nealy tells Channel 2 Action News anchor Jovita Moore that she felt it was important to make sure the clinical trials were as diverse as possible.

"I actually wanted to do a clinical trial before I even saw the ad. I had registered at the website that Dr. Fauci mentioned, the Covid prevention network, and I never heard a call back. So whenever I saw the ad, I was like, let me just see if they'll accept me for this trial. So I signed up and less than two hours later actually got a call to participate in the trial," Nealy said.

Nealy said she was aware that there aren't enough Black volunteers for the trials and that there cannot be a vaccine product without more Black people. "So I figured that I can put my name in a hat and see if I can help be part of that," she said.

The vaccines contain RNA (Ribonucleic acid) that use specific instructions to tell human cells to produce antibodies against the coronavirus.

The RNA vaccine differs from normal vaccines that contain dead virus particles that trigger the immune system to produce antibodies against a specific pathogen.

RNA vaccines have never been approved for human use before because of the potential for something to go wrong.

What if human cells misread the mRNA instructions and go haywire inside the body?

Nealy says she participated in the trials knowing the RNA vaccine could negatively impact her health.

"This is so that I can help stop the pandemic and make sure that the vaccine works for Black Americans and everyone whenever it comes out," she told Moore.

"You know, so many people will say that they sort of have a mistrust," said Moore. "You're like a guinea pig. You don't know what's going to happen. You don't know what you're being injected with. What would you say to those people who have a real fear or maybe just a lack of interest right now?"

"Yeah, I will say I definitely understand," Nealy responded. "I know Black people in particular have a really long mistrust history with public health and with us being experimented on. And I understand that 100%. I will say if you are willing, and maybe if you're like a guinea pig like me to definitely participate, because we really can't move forward on this pandemic without knowing that a vaccine works for all of us."

Nealy says so far there have been no side effects.

"So actually, the next day after getting the vaccine, I did feel tired. I wasn't expecting to feel that fatigue. And I did have some body aches and sweating. And that was some of the things that they said you might experience if you have the vaccine."

Some volunteers received placebos while others were given the real vaccine.

"And then of course, they can't tell us but I'm pretty sure I did. And those are the only symptoms I had. They only lasted about a day and the next day I was fine," said Nealy.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has asked all 50 states to prepare for massive distributions of Covid-19 vaccines by late October or early November.

Further complicating the vaccination effort is the cold storage requirement and the fact that two vaccine doses will need to be given 2 weeks apart.

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The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has asked states to prepare for massive distributions of Covid-19 vaccines by early November.

Public health officials want the most vulnerable high-risk groups to get the Covid-19 vaccine as soon as late October or early November.

Officials agree that health agencies in all 50 states should "urgently" prepare for a complex effort to distribute the vaccines to "hundreds of millions" of Americans - despite the fact that the death rate is very low.

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The CDC sent guidance to every state on the same day President Trump told the Republican National Convention that a vaccine might be ready before the end of the year.

Over a dozen companies have accelerated clinical trials in a race to get their vaccines to market first. The usual safeguards have been waived in order to get the vaccines to market in a matter of months.

The FDA normally requires three years of clinical trials before a vaccine goes to market.

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The vaccine contains RNA (Ribonucleic acid) that are designed to alter the body's host cells to produce antibodies against the coronavirus.

Unlike normal vaccines, which contain DNA fragments of dead virus to produce antibodies, RNA vaccines are genetically engineered messenger RNA that contain specific directions to alter human DNA and tell it to create proteins, which in turn stimulates the cells to make antibodies.

RNA vaccines don't require dead pathogens to make antibodies. The human host's own genetic code is theoretically supposed to be altered (changed) by the RNA vaccine. RNA vaccines have been used on animals in veterinary medicine for years.

No RNA vaccines have ever been approved for human use.

Dr. Anthony Fauci and and Dr. Stephen Hahn, who heads the Food and Drug Administration, have said in interviews that RNA vaccines should be made readily available for certain groups, i.e. Black people, the elderly over 65, and "those incarcerated", before clinical trials have been completed.

Doctors and nurses on the frontlines will get the vaccines first, according to Fauci.

With so few Black people willing to step up and volunteer to be guinea pigs, the CDC's guidance acknowledged that its distribution plan is "hypothetical".

Dr. Saskia Popescu, an infection prevention epidemiologist based in Arizona, is concerned that the vaccine is highly politicized.

"It's hard not to see this as a push for a pre-election vaccine," he said.

Further complicating the vaccination effort is the cold storage requirement and the fact that two doses will need to be given 2 weeks apart.

"How are you going to make sure people get both [doses]?" said Dr. Cedric Dark, an emergency medicine physician at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas.

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Dwayne Johnson is counting his blessings after revealing he and every member of his immediate family tested positive for COVID-19.

In a new video message, the Jumanji: The Next Level star shared that he, his wife Lauren, and their daughters, Jasmine and Tiana, were diagnosed with the coronavirus, adding the diagnoses are among "the most challenging and difficult" things he's ever had to deal with.

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"Testing positive for COVID-19 is a lot different than recovering from nasty injuries, getting evicted or being broke, which I've been more than a few times," he said. "My number one priority is to always protect my family and my loved ones... I wish it was only me that tested positive.

"It was my entire family and it was a kick in the gut."

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But he admits there's light at the end of the tunnel, adding, "We're on the other end of it and no longer contagious. Thank God, we're healthy.

"We are counting our blessings right now. We are well aware you don't always get to the other end of COVID-19 stronger and healthier. I have had some of my best friends lose their parents to this virus that is so incredibly relentless and unforgiving. We are counting our blessings, but we are good."

Dwayne ended the video message by urging fans and followers to always wear a mask when out in public and limit the amount of people at social gatherings.

He's not the only Hollywood star who has tested positive for COVID-19.

Tom Hanks and his wife Rita Wilson were the first back in March, and Idris Elba, Kevin Hart, Antonio Banderas, Lena Dunham, Bryan Cranston, and Mel Gibson have all battled the deadly virus, which has claimed the lives of almost 860,000 people around the world.

Johnson is the latest celebrity to test positive for Covid-19 while wearing a face mask.

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Twitter.com removed a viral post retweeted by President Donald Trump over the weekend that showed the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) dramatically revised the Covid-19 death toll to just over 9,000 cases.

In a weekly update on its website on Aug. 26, the Atlanta-based agency noted only 6% of Covid-19 deaths were due to Covid-19 alone. 94% of deaths had underlying medical conditions. The majority of the deaths were people over age 65.

Under Table 3: "Provisional Death Counts for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)", the CDC lists conditions contributing to Covid-19 deaths in death certificates.

Of the deaths related to Covid-19, only 6% listed Covid-19 alone. 94% had other causes of death, such as cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, gunshot wounds or car accidents.

All of the cases were counted as Covid-19-related deaths bringing the death toll in the U.S. to over 180,000. If only Covid-19 was listed on the death certificates, the death toll would be just over 9,000 -- far less than deaths caused by the common flu.

President Trump retweeted the viral post that trended under the hashtag #only6%.

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Anyone who clicked the link saw the message: "This Tweet is no longer available because it violated the Twitter Rules."

Twitter decided the post violated its rules because it didn't fully explain: "For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 2.6 additional conditions or causes per death."

Twitter was annoyed that users would see the viral post and assume that only 6% of those who died from Covid-19 didn't have any preexisting conditions -- even though that is basically what the CDC stated based on the death certificates.

The death toll from Covid-19 has plunged to record lows, particularly in the East. For example, Maine and New York City counted no new Covid-19 deaths in the past two weeks.

The CDC recommends hand washing and social distancing to prevent spread of the flu-like coronavirus.

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Kevin Hart has received a public apology from NBC Network officials after a photo of the comedian was used to accompany news articles about Jamaican Olympic sprinter Usain Bolt.

The headline read: "Usain Bolt, the fastest man alive, tests positive for coronavirus".

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Bolt confirmed he tested positive for the coronavirus following a huge birthday bash in Jamaica last week. Hart and Bolt are Black - but they don't pass for twins.

The Jumanji: Next Level star was left stunned on Tuesday after noticing his photo appeared in online NBC News pieces detailing Bolt's positive COVID-19 test.

Hart, who recently revealed he was diagnosed with the coronavirus back in March, shared a screenshot of the glaring mix-up of the two black celebrities, and remarked, "No comment", alongside a series of facepalm emojis.

The famously short funnyman then quipped, "I must of gotten really fast & tall overnight....I want to take advantage of this moment & race anybody in the world. We can bet whatever....S**t just got real. I am also no longer doing comedy due to my Olympic training schedule....IM BACK B**CHES!!!!!!

"P.S this is Disrespectful on so many levels....All you can do is laugh. Maybe the Covid 19 shrunk his legs & torso".

Bolt has yet to comment on the photo mishap, but an NBC News representative has since issued a formal apology to Hart via Twitter.

"Very sorry about that @KevinHart4real - bad technical glitch in how photos show up on Facebook," the spokesperson posted.

The picture problem has also been corrected, with editors noting, "A previous version of this article included an incorrect photo on some platforms due to a technical problem. The photo depicted actor Kevin Hart. It has been replaced with a photo of Usain Bolt."
 

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Alice Marie Johnson, who was granted clemency by President Donald Trump, will be one of the guest speakers at the Republican National Convention.

Trump commuted Johnson's life sentence in 2018 after she served 21 years for a nonviolent drug crime.

Johnson hopes her message of redemption and freedom will resonate with the RNC audience.

"I'll be there talking about criminal justice reform, that is my main mission," Jonson tells The Daily Beast.

"I'm there because I've been affected by our criminal justice system," she added.

Trump, 74, clinched the Republican nomination for a second term on the first day of the Republican National Convention on Monday. Aug. 24.

The president spoke for nearly an hour at the Charlotte Convention Center. "This is the most important election in the history of our country," Trump told the audience. "This is the biggest."

The crowd chanted "four more years" as Trump arrived at the convention center. "If you really want to drive them crazy, say 12 more years," Trump joked.

Democrats believe Trump has no plans to leave the White House if he loses the 2020 election to Joe Biden.

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Meanwhile, the 77-year-old Democratic nominee confirmed he will campaign from his basement in Delaware over the next three months.

In a rare interview with ABC's World News Tonight, Biden responded to anchor David Muir questioning whether he can win an election from his home.

"We will," Biden said. "We're gonna follow the science, what the scientists tell us. We've been able to travel to places when we've been able to do it in a way that we don't cause the congregation of large numbers of people."

Biden's campaign say he will campaign from his basement until November due to the coronavirus pandemic.