Terry Crews

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Terry Crews is in the blog headlines again after he was practically run off Twitter for his statement about "Black supremacy".

Crews was on the hot seat in June for tweeting: "Defeating White supremacy without White people creates Black supremacy. Equality is the truth.

"Like it or not, we are all in this together."

This time Crews is being dragged for a comment he made comparing the Ku Klux Klan to Black people.

In response to racist remarks made by television host Nick Cannon about white people and Jews, Crews tweeted, "toldja so!"

Crews captioned a clip of Cannon's controversial statements, saying white people were “savages" who lacked malanin because they originated from a "hostile" climate where they were exposed to less sunshine than Africans.

Crews said Cannon's comments were rooted in the "Black supremacy" ideology that he warned about.

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Crews, pictured with his wife, Rebecca King, implied that Black Supremacy is more detrimental to society than white supremacy.

"We have to include this white voice, this Hispanic voice, this Asian voice. We have to include it RIGHT NOW, because if we don't ... it's going to slip into something we are really not prepared for," Crews warned.

When a follower tweeted, "You going so hard against nick cannon, but when you fall, NO BLACK PERSON will have your back," Crews responded:

"When I was young, I was never afraid of the KKK... It was people like you. The threats, the intimidation, discouraging free thought, and 'the insult of acting white.' My heart breaks because your behavior only reveals you don't know how powerful you are."

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Lupita Nyong'o believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

The 36-year-old Pisces was born in Mexico but raised in Kenya, which gave her a different perspective on race and racism in Black America.

She tells BBC Newsnight that she still experienced "colorism" prejudice due to having darker skin. But it was only after she arrived in the U.S. that she saw how people were divided by race.

"Race is a very social construct, one that I didn't have to ascribe to on a daily basis growing up," she says. "As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black."

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She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

Lupita says she was once told she was "too dark" to appear on TV, and that she was not as pretty as her sister, who had lighter skin.

"I definitely grew up feeling uncomfortable with my skin color because I felt like the world around me awarded lighter skin," the Black Panther star explains.

As a result, she believes Americans favor lighter skin even among those who are Black.

"We still ascribe to these notions of Eurocentric standards of beauty, that then effect how we see ourselves among ourselves," she adds.

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