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Dr. Dre's estranged wife dealt him a low blow at the cemetery as he buried his beloved grandmother.

According to TMZ, a process server for Nicole Threatt Young attempted to serve Dre with legal documents at his grandmother's burial site.

Sources tell TMZ that Dre was at a Los Angeles cemetery on Monday to lay to rest the woman who helped raise him.

A process server approached Dre as he stood near his grandma's casket and attempted to serve him.

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However, Nicole's camp tells TMZ that Dre was respectfully served with the papers in the cemetery's parking lot after the burial.

Dre reportedly responded in anger and refused to take the documents from the server, who dropped the documents at the graveside and left.

Nicole's sources say the papers were dropped in the parking lot.

In most states, it is legal to drop a summons or subpoena on the ground if a person refuses to be served.

TMZ reports that the papers involved a demand for additional payment of Nicole's exorbitant attorney's fees.

If you recall, a judge ordered Dre to pay Nicole an additional $1,550,000 in attorney's fees.

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The legendary rapper has already shelled out a payment of $2 million to her lawyers. And in the past year, he made two separate payments of $500,000 each.

Dr. Dre objected to the excessive attorney's fees - which now total more than $4.5 million, but the judge dismissed his complaints.

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Dave Chappelle has asked Netflix to pull his popular "Chapelle's Show" from its lineup, and the comedian told fans not watch his streaming shows on any platform until he is paid.

Chappelle slammed Netflix and ViacomCBS for licensing the Comedy Central hit without paying him.

Deadline.com confirmed the show's removal. Netflix licensed the show on a non-exclusive basis. The show also streams on HBO Max and ViacomCBS platforms like CBS All Access.

Deadline notes that companies license shows by paying the seller who, in turn, pays the artists.

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But Chappelle is still waiting for his checks. He posted a video on Instagram titled "Unforgiven" in which he companied that he was not paid by Netflix or ViacomCBS.
 

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Some people can't handle a little fame, and sources say Todrick Hall is no exception. The singer and choreographer took to Twitter.com to apologize after disgruntled staffers complained that he refuses to pay them.

According to WENN.com, Todrick is accused of not paying dancers for months of work. The 34-year-old Aries rose to fame on American Idol in 2009 before carving out a successful career for himself on YouTube, in music, television and in theater.

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Todrick came under fire after dancer Thom White shared his experience working with him on Twitter, writing: "A bunch of folks have asked about my experience working with Todrick... Your reservations about the fella are valid."

Thom accused Todrick of not paying him for dance work, and he claimed the performer discriminated against Black dancers on a music video set, writing: "He turned to us to say 'this is looking a little too chocolate... Can I get some lighter people behind me'."

Taking to Twitter to defend himself, Todrick insisted he "adores" Thom, adding: "This is surprising to me, he hasn't been paid yet, he will be... not because he's trying to 'expose' me but because he deserves it. I only got two texts, no calls, I was over seas opening my tour & that video has only been out for 2 weeks."

Following the post, Drag Race alum Manila Luzon took to the comments alleging Todrick owed her money too, writing: "Well you still owe me for hosting your Halloween party since LAST YEAR so..." - referring to his Halloween Ball in 2018.

More allegations soon came to light, with Todrick's former assistant Thomas McKissock agreeing with Thom's claims he was late with payments and showed racist tendencies.

Todrick was the choreographer for Beyonce Knowles-Carter's music video for "Blow".

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Beyonce claims her daughter Blue Ivy is a "cultural icon" in her legal battle with a wedding planner over trademarking Blue Ivy's name.

It all started after a surrogate allegedly delivered Blue Ivy in a New York hospital 7 years ago. Beyonce, 39, and her husband, rapper Jay-Z, 50, filed paperwork to trademark the newborn's name, Blue Ivy Carter, for the purpose of selling merchandise (dolls, clothing, etc.) bearing the girl's name.

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But wedding planner Wendy Morales already laid claim to the "Blue Ivy" name before the more famous Blue Ivy was even born.

After negotiations to the rights for the name fell through, Beyonce filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against Morales.

The case took a nasty turn when Morales accused Beyonce of fraud, but the river boat singer has since hit back, arguing that the trademark is legit because consumers are more likely to associate the name with her daughter.

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Besides that, Beyonce claims Blue Ivy is a "cultural icon" whose fashion sense and style are celebrated all over the world, and that consumers are likely to be confused if they see her name on a boutique wedding event planning business.

Beyonce's legal team claims the trademark that the superstar couple filed for is "Blue Ivy Carter" and not just "Blue Ivy."

Beyonce claims Morales runs a "small business, with just three regional offices and a handful of employees", with weak online presence.

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On the other hand:

"Blue Ivy Carter is a cultural icon who has been described as a 'mini style star' and has been celebrated for her 'fashion moments' over the years. Her life and activities are followed extensively by the media and the public," the Carters state in documents obtained by The Blast.

"Most significantly, Blue Ivy Carter has achieved a significant amount of fame, particularly at such a young age. She also has a noted and well-chronicled interest in fashion. Given these factors, Blue Ivy Carter is capable of and interested in becoming the face of a brand. For this reason, the factual context demonstrates that BGK filed the Application with the intent to build a brand around Blue Ivy Carter and her public reputation and renown."

Both parties are headed for trial over the trademark issue.

Tyga, King Cairo Stevenson

Washed up rapper Tyga has reached a new low in his habit of skipping out on paying his bills. The 28-year-old Cash Money Records artist apparently used his 5-year-old son King Cairo Stevenson's good credit to rent a mansion from Simon Cowell's ex-fiancée.

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Amy Schumer

Mo'Nique continues her public dispute with Netflix over pay disparities and gender and race inequality. Over the weekend, the 50-year-old comedienne called for a boycott of the online streaming giant after she claims she was offered $500,000 for a standup comedy special -- a fraction of what Netflix pays comedians such as actress Amy Schumer (who is not funny at all) and Chris Rock.

Comedienne Wanda Sykes also criticized Netflix for paying her pennies compared to what men and Caucasian comics receive.

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Mariah Carey, bodyguard Michael Anello

The boss of a security firm which provided Mariah Carey's bodyguards has alleged sexual harassment in a lawsuit he filed for unpaid wages.

A lawyer for Michael Anello, the president of Anello Security & Consulting, is preparing to file a lawsuit alleging Carey owes more than $700,000 in agreed payments.

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