Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

Mo'Nique's new Netflix stand-up comedy special is in the works after settling a lawsuit with the streaming giant.

Netflix announced the new comedy special in a tweet on Tuesday.

"Thrilled to announce that Netflix is the home for the next original stand-up special from the groundbreaking, trailblazing, and iconic Mo'Nique!"

"Can y'all believe this s---?," Mo' asks in a new video. "I done came on home to Netflix."

According to Variety, the comedy special will be filmed later this year in Atlanta.

In June Netflix announced a settlement agreement with the stand-up comedienne more than two years after she sued the streaming network for offering her less money for a stand-up special than her fellow male or white female counterparts.

Phillip Faraone/Getty Images

Usher Raymond and his eldest son Usher "Cinco" Raymond V, 14, attended the Netflix World Premiere of Hustle at Regency Village Theatre on Wednesday, June 01, in Los Angeles, California.

Image Press Agency / BACKGRID

LeBron and Savannah James attended the Los Angeles Premiere Of Netflix's 'Hustle' held at the Regency Village Theatre in Los Angeles. LeBron joined the billionaire's club becoming the first active NBA player to have a net worth of $1 billion according to Forbes.

Image Press Agency / BACKGRID

Actors Queen Latifah and Adam Sandler attended the Los Angeles Premiere Of Netflix's 'Hustle' held at the Regency Village Theatre in Los Angeles, CA.

Hustle is about a washed-up basketball scout (Sandler) who discovers a phenomenal street ball player while in Spain and sees him as his ticket back into the NBA.

MediaPunch / BACKGRID

Karrueche Tran attended the Netflix World Premiere Of Hustle at the Westwood Regency Village Theatre in Los Angeles.

MediaPunch / BACKGRID

Comedienne Luenell attended the Los Angeles Premiere Of Netflix's 'Hustle' held at the Regency Village Theatre.

Image Press Agency / BACKGRID

Actor LaKeith Stanfield attended the Netflix World Premiere Of Hustle at the Westwood Regency Village Theatre in Los Angeles.

MediaPunch / BACKGRID

Actor Bill Bellamy attended the Netflix World Premiere Of Hustle at the Westwood Regency Village Theatre in Los Angeles.

See more photos in the gallery below.

Pool/Getty Images

Netflix laid off dozens of employees, including nearly the entire staff of Black, Latina and Asian women at internal fan blog, Tadum.

The move came after Netflix reported disappointing first quarter earnings and a loss of over 200,000 subscribers.

Netflix's stock price cratered from a high of $700 a share a year ago to a low of $185 per share last week.

Former Netflix employees took to Twitter.com last week to complain about the company's broken promises.

One former staffer tweeted:

"still processing that netflix recruited me from my union job of SIX YEARS... with the promise of new opportunities and a diverse team, only to lay me off months later with TWO WEEKS severance..."

Another former employee wrote:

"Uh oh! Looks like I have to do this tweet again. Is anyone hiring? Netflix just laid off my team (my job included). It was an incredible few months and I'm grateful for it but I'm stoked about whatever's next. Email is in bio."

In addition to shedding employees, Netflix canceled nearly all of its animated series, including Meghan Markle's animated series "Pearl".

"Pearl" is among several animation projects that were cut.

One show to survive the chopping block is a documentary nature series narrated by former President Barack Obama.

Netflix announced a multiyear deal with Barack and Michelle Obama to create original content for the streaming service last year.

Photo may have been deleted

Netflix

Tyler Perry's A Madea Homecoming is a huge hit. Tyler's latest comedy movie is the number one streaming film on Netflix.

Tyler brought Madea Simmons out of retirement for her great-grandson's college graduation celebration.

Perry stars as Madea, the silver haired, feisty matriarch who carries a small gun in her purse.

The comedy also stars David and Tamela J. Mann, Cassi Davis, Gabrielle Dennis, and newcomers Brandon Black as Tim, and Candace Maxwell as Ellie.

A Madea Homecoming is Tyler's second film to be released on Netflix. The movie is getting rave reviews from movie critics. Variety.com calls the film "The Fastest, Funniest Tyler Perry Movie in a While."

Those who had something negative to say complained about the copious use of the n-word and the f-bombs dropped throughout the movie.

Photo may have been deleted

Netflix

But fans are still buzzing about the ending credits scene in which Madea reenacts Beyonce's Coachella performance of her hit song "Drunk In Love" at Machella.

Madea is 68 years old and 6-foot-5, but she and Beyonce, 40, could pass for twins. The resemblance is uncanny.

Watch the video below.
 

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube/Netflix

Tyler Perry is bringing his iconic character Madea out of retirement for a Netflix movie.

"A Madea Homegoing" is the first Tyler Perry movie to skip theaters and head directly to the streaming platform.

Netflix dropped the first trailer for "A Madea Homegoing" on Wednesday, after teasing the movie on social media.

"Live from her backyard. I want to thank my incredible Moth-hive. MS-Chella," Perry wrote on Instagram.

The movie focuses on drama that erupts at Madea's great grandson's college graduation celebration.

Tyler killed off his feisty grandmama character in 2019. He said it was time to retire the outspoken senior citizen who had a lengthy criminal record dating back to age 9.

Madea's criminal history includes charges for assault with a deadly weapon, attempted murder and vehicle theft.

"I just don't want to be her age playing her," said Tyler, 52.

Madea's final full length movie role was A Madea Family Funeral in 2019.

Watch the trailer below.
 

Lester Cohen/WireImage

Netflix has shifted $100 million to Black banks to follow through on its commitment to close the equity gap.

Netflix's co-CEO Ted Sarandos (2nd from right) is married to Nicole Avant (right), daughter of music legend Clarence Avant (left) and Jacqueline Avant (2nd from left).

Mrs. Avant, 81, was killed during a home invasion in Beverly Hills on Wednesday.

Netflix moved 2 percent of its cash holdings, $100 million, to Black banks to address systemic racism, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The Black financial institutions include Hope Credit Union, the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), The Change Company, Enterprise Community Impact Note, OneUnited Bank and Calvert Impact Capital's Community Investment Note.

Netflix's goal is to improve systemic racism that prevents Black-owned businesses from getting loans, especially those impacted by the pandemic.

"Because we pegged our commitment to 2 percent of Netflix’s cash, the investment also grows overtime [sic]. So we will be 'topping up' our commitment at the end of the year and moving more cash — over and above the $100 million already committed — into these institutions," Netflix's Aaron Mitchell and Shannon Alwyn wrote in a Dec. 1 post.

Photo may have been deleted

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Once again, Beyonce is not following anyone on Instagram. Her husband Jay Z deleted his IG page after just one day.

The 51-year-old rapper caused a minor frenzy when he joined the platform on Tuesday, but, despite amassing more than 2 million followers, his account was disabled.

BACKGRID

During his brief time on Instagram, Jay only followed his wife Beyonce and she followed him back.

His first post featured a movie poster promoting the release of new Netflix western movie, The Harder They Fall.

Photo may have been deleted

Instagram

The film features an all-Black cast, including Idris Elba, Regina King, Jonathan Majors, LaKeith Stanfield, Delroy Lindo, Deon Cole and Damon Wayans Jr.

Jay Z opened up about opening doors for other minorities in an interview with Entertainment Tonight in October.

"I love to be a part of projects that widen the lens. Once it's widened for us, it's widened for Asians. For Mexicans. For everyone.

"[For years], one of the only things on public television was Westerns, every week, and we weren't represented in those at all. In fact, our characters were taken from us. The Lone Ranger was based on one of the characters from this film."

The "99 Problems" rapper serves as a producer for the film - which launched on Netflix this week - and he also produced the movie's soundtrack.

Photo may have been deleted

Netflix

If you missed Colin Kaepernick's new Netflix series, "Colin in Black and White," you didn't miss much. The series is getting terrible reviews.

Sports journalist and culture critic Jason Whitlock called the series "absolutely embarrassing."

How bad is it? One critic said Kaepernick "Continues to show time and time again that he is one of the biggest scumbags in all of the world."

Photo may have been deleted

Netflix

The series is about Kaepernick coming of age from a mixed race baby adopted by white parents to a failed NFL quarterback. Actor Jaden Michael plays young Colin.

The series was developed by Kaepernick, co-creator Ava DuVernay, and showrunner Michael Starrbury.

They attempt to portray Kaepernick as a modern day civil rights hero, but they fail miserably because he can't get out of the way of his own gigantic ego.

Kaepernick is still bitter that no NFL team wants to sign him to a contract.

In one episode, Kaepernick compared the NFL combine to the slave trade (yes, he went there).

"What they don't want you to understand is what's being established is a power dynamic," he said.

"Before they put you on the field, teams poke, prod and examine you searching for any defect that might affect your performance. No boundary respected. No dignity left intact."

Then a group of players walk off the field and line up near an auction platform.

A bit overly dramatic? Yes, but we're talking about Colin Kaepernick. This series exposes Kaeprnick for who he really is: an unrepentant narcissist.
 

Stacy Revere/Getty Images

Dave Chappelle refuses to bend to demands from a group of transgender Netflix employees.

The comedian's representatives announced he would meet with the employees after refusing to meet with them for weeks.

Chappelle joked he will meet with the Netflix employees - if they admit lesbian comedienne Hannah Gadsby isn't funny.

Hannah is a male-identified lesbian who criticized Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos after he defended Chappelle's Netflix special, The Closer.

The controversial comic, who is currently on a 10-city comedy tour, shared a video to Instagram from his Nashville show, in which he addressed the Netflix employees directly.

"To the transgender community, I am more than willing to give you an audience, but you will not summon me. I am not bending to anybody's demands," the Emmy winner says in the five-minute Instagram clip. Comments on the post appear to have been turned off.

Lester Cohen/WireImage

He added:

"And if you want to meet with me, I'd be more than willing to, but I have some conditions. First of all, you cannot come if you have not watched my special from beginning to end. You must come to a place of my choosing at a time of my choosing, and thirdly, you must admit that Hannah Gadsby is not funny."

In the Instagram video, Chappelle said he was disinvited from film festivals following The Closer backlash.

"Thank God for Ted Sarandos and Netflix, he's the only one that didn't cancel me yet."

According to a source who was at the Nashville show, Dave started his set with a "statement" to those he'd offended, jokingly pulling out a piece of paper and reading "F**k y'all, n**gas!" TMZ reported.

Chappelle will air a documentary, "Untitled," during his tour stops in 10 cities, including Atlanta on Nov. 21.
 

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Dave Chappelle has agreed to sit down with transgender employees at Netflix who staged a walkout near the company's Los Angeles headquarters on Wednesday.

Chappelle, 48, came under fire for transgender jokes in his Netflix comedy special, The Closer.

He remained silent as LGBT+ activists on both sides protested and defended his comedy special.

Derrick Salters/WENN.com

Dave now says he is willing to sit down at the table with Netflix employees who feel he caused harm to transgender people with his off-color jokes.

The comedian's rep tells TMZ that Dave is open to dialogue if Netflix employees reach out to him for a discussion.

Dave's camp says no one from Netflix has approached Chappelle or his team about setting up a meeting, which conflicts with what Netflix employees claim.

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Activist Ashlee Marie Preston (pictured) claims Chappelle rejected an invitation to meet with the transgender employees.

As TMZ reported, Preston invited Chappelle to come to the table to talk about the damage he's inflicted on the LGBTQ+ community, but "Dave chose not to show up."

Jaime Espinoza/WENN.com

Dave's camp says he's open to dialogue with any group, as he points out in his Netflix special jokes.

Dave made the point in his special, that empathy should go both ways and that transgenders should stop "punching down" on his people.

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

The Netflix employee walkout is happening now outside Netflix's Los Angeles headquarters in protest over Dave Chappelle's comedy special.

Hundreds of employees walked out of Netflix's headquarters on Wednesday, Oct. 20. The protesters are angry over Chappelle's transgender jokes in his comedy special The Closer.
 

 

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

"Transphobia is not a joke," said Ashlee Marie Preston (pictured), who organized the walkout.

"We're up against the emergence of hate economy. And there is this manipulation of algorithmic science that distorts the way that we perceive ourselves and others. And I think that companies like Netflix, Facebook, and Instagram, they play into it, and they monetize on it. And so I think that this is important to show up today."

Preston invited Chappelle to meet with them before the walkout, but he refused.

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Chappelle's transgender supporters tried to disrupt the protest.

Counter protesters held up signs reading "Jokes Are Funny," and "Netflix Don't Cancel Free Speech."

"We are protesting this walkout. They have the right to do it, but we have the right to standup for Dave Chappelle and his freedom of expression," said Gigi LaRoux, a transgender Chappelle supporter.

"This boils down to equality, and if people want equality they need to be put on the same level as anybody else. Comedians are equal opportunity destroyers. You can't pick and choose who you're going to make fun of."

Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos walked back memos he sent to staff in support of Chappelle.

"I can tell you I screwed up those two communications, but my stance hasn't changed," Sarandos said in a phone interview with The Hollywood Reporter.

Sarandos said he should have acknowledged that "a group of our employees were in pain" and "hurt" by the company's decision to air the special.

"I'd say those emails lacked humanity, in which I like to and I do generally communicate with our teams," he added.
 

Jemal Countess/FilmMagic

Ted Sarandos apologized for internal memos to his staff about Dave Chappelle ahead of a planned walkout by 1,000 Netflix employees on Wednesday, Oct. 20.

Sarandos previously insisted he wouldn't remove Chappelle's hit comedy special, The Closer, despite outrage from transgender employees over Chappelle's transgender jokes.

"I can tell you I screwed up those two communications, but my stance hasn't changed," the Netflix co-CEO said in a phone interview with The Hollywood Reporter.

Sarandos said he should have acknowledged that "a group of our employees were in pain" and "hurt" by the company's decision to air the special.

Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

"I'd say those emails lacked humanity, in which I like to and I do generally communicate with our teams," said Sarandos who is married to Nicole Avant, former U.S. Ambassador to the Bahamas.

"...this is the problem when you have a leaked email out of context, is it's part of a conversation already in progress, and that line of causing harm in the real world was way over simplistic and talking about something very specific that we were talking about earlier that day."

Stacy Revere/Getty Images

Sarandos reiterated that Chappelle's comedy special - for which the comedian was paid $24.1 million - was in line with Netflix's stringent policy on harmful content.

Dave Benett/Getty Images

The Netflix chief (right) said he didn't think it would be "appropriate" for him to add a disclaimer about harmful content before airing Chappelle's special.

"The content is age restricted already for language, and Dave himself gives a very explicit warning at the beginning of the show, so I don't think it would be appropriate in this case."

He continued:

"But I do think that the inclusion of the special on Netflix is consistent with our comedy offering, it's consistent with Dave Chappelle's comedy brand and this is ... one of those times when there's something on Netflix that you're not going to like."

AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images

Netflix fired a longtime employee who leaked the amount that the company paid Dave Chappelle for his controversial comedy special The Closer.

The employee was let go after they leaked that Netflix paid Chappelle $24.1 million for The Closer and $23.6 million for his 2019 comedy special Sticks & Stones.

Juan Rico / BACKGRID

By comparison, Netflix spent $21.4 million for Squid Game, which is Netflix's biggest series launch ever.

A spokesperson for the company announced on Friday:

"We have let go of an employee for sharing confidential, commercially sensitive information outside the company."

The job termination comes amid ongoing tensions over transgender jokes Chappelle told in The Closer.

Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Netflix's co-CEO Ted Sarandos, pictured with his wife Nicole Avant, previously said he would not pull The Closer off the air after three employees were suspended for crashing an annual meeting of Netflix's top directors.

The three employees were reinstated this week. However, Netflix's transgender employees plan to strike on Oct. 20.

Netflix's other co-CEO Reed Hastings told angry staff "We are on the right side of history" in a post on an internal message board.

Lesbian comedian Hannah Gadsby wrote an open letter to Sarandos on Instagram slamming him for using her name to defend Chappelle.

"F**k you and your amoral algorithm cult..." she wrote.

Photo may have been deleted

AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images

A group of Netflix transgender employees plan to strike next week in protest of Dave Chappelle's "The Closer" comedy special.

Netflix has lifted the suspension of three employees, including a male-to-female transgender, who protested Chappelle's comedy special on social media.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Netflix software engineer Terra Field, an MtF transgender, has been reinstated along with two other employees.

Prior to the suspension, Field wrote a lengthy Twitter thread on Oct. 9, complaining about Chappelle's Netflix special.

The three employees were suspended for crashing an annual directors meeting to complain about Chappelle at the company headquarters in San Francisco.

Netflix invites 500 top employees to the annual meeting, but Field and the other two workers were not invited.

Field tweeted the reinstatement notice on Tuesday.

"Our investigation did not find that you joined the QBR meeting with any ill intent and that you genuinely didn't think there was anything wrong with seeking access to this meeting."

Field added, "At the very least, I feel vindicated."

A transgender employee resource group at Netflix plans to walk off the job on October 20th to protest statements made by Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos regarding Chappelle.

Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Sarandos, pictured with his wife Nicole Avant, denied suspending the three employees for complaining about Chappelle.

Sarandos added he will not pull Chappelle's comedy special off the air.

In an internal memo, the trans resource group ERG wrote:

"Trans Lives Matter. Trans Rights Matter. And as an organization, Netflix has continually failed to show deep care in our mission to Entertain the World by repeatedly releasing content that harms the Trans community and continually failing to create content that represents and uplifts Trans content. We can and must do better!"

Photo may have been deleted

Instagram, Getty Images

Flame Monroe rushed to defend fellow comedian Dave Chappelle following outrage over his Netflix comedy special, The Closer.

Flame -- a Black trans comic -- tells TMZ he's not in favor of taking Dave's new Netflix special off the air - because in the world of comedy, nothing is off-limits.

Dave cracking jokes over the LGBTQ+ community is fair game, says Flame, and should NOT be censored in the slightest.

"So as a comedian I believe that I don't want to be censored," Flame tells TMZ.

"I think that nothing is off limits and I think the social climate right now and the temperament started way back with Norman Lear, who had his finger on the pulse many years ago."

Flame went on to explain that Lear took risks with his television shows, such as Good Times and The Jeffersons, which tackled social issues such as racism and intolerance.

"The world has become too censored," said Flame.

"As a comedian, I don't want to be censored. As a trans woman, I want equality. And as a Black person, I want fair treatment in this country that we've been trying to get for 400 years."

Comedian Damon Wayans praised Chappelle for freeing comedian slaves who worried about being canceled.

Flame goes further by praising Chappelle as "great," while also saying he believes Chappelle has brought people together in a much needed way -- to create open dialogue.

Flame said, "I absolutely do not think the special should be taken off of Netflix... There is no topic that should be off limits."