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Pastor John Gray is showing signs of improvement after suffering blood clots in his lungs.

In an Instagram post, the pastor's wife, Aventer Gray, said he was diagnosed with a saddle pulmonary embolism, a rare condition named for the position of blood clots in the large artery that feeds deoxygenated blood from the heart to both lungs.

Marcus Ingram/Getty Images

Aventer, who shares 2 minor children with Gray, went on to explain he "was feeling a little different" over the past few weeks. He went to the emergency room "and was immediately admitted to CCU with a saddle Pulmonary Embolism in the pulmonary artery and more lung blood clots."
 
RELATED: Medical Minute: Saddle Pulmonary Embolism
 
On Monday, Aventer updated her Instagram followers on her husband's condition. She said he was stable enough to be transferred to a hospital in Atlanta.

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Photo may have been deleted

Screenshot

Pastor John Gray is in a critical care unit (CCU) after being diagnosed with rare blood clots in his lungs called saddle pulmonary embolism (PE).

The pastor's wife, Aventer Gray, took to Instagram to advise her followers of her husband's grave medical condition.

She shared several photos in a post on her @iamaventergray Instagram page on Sunday, July 10.

She captioned the post: "Hello family. My family and I stand in need of a miracle. Please keep my husband @realjohngray in your prayers..."

Aventer, who shares 2 minor children with Gray, went on to explain he "was feeling a little different" over the past few weeks. He went to the emergency room on Thursday "and was immediately admitted to CCU with a saddle Pulmonary Embolism in the pulmonary artery and more lung blood clots."

Robin L Marshall/Getty Images

Aventer continued:

"The Saddle PE is in a position that could potentially end his life if it shifts at all. The clot burden is severe and only God is holding it in place. He is currently in CCU and based on CT & Echo we will need two types of surgery due to the pressure now on the heart within the next 24 hours. To place this in perspective, the doctor said that people have come into the hospital dead with this exact scenario he walked in with.

"The Doctor said God has to keep him through the night and he can not move, not even get up to walk to a bathroom.

"Ok, COOL! Thanks ma'am! God isn't done! I don't care what CT, ECHO, All or any of the tests show! It's clear God isn't finished. Clots have to bow to my God! That's all! I need as many people who believe in the miracle healing power Of Jesus Christ to join me and my family and our church as we cry out on behalf of John W. Gray III.

"I'm rocking with God, Relentlessly!"


 

What is a saddle pulmonary embolism?

A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot that causes a blockage in the main pulmonary artery in the lungs.

A saddle pulmonary embolism is so named because of its position in the main pulmonary artery trunk between the lungs.

A saddle PE is a large blood clot that lodges where the main pulmonary artery trunk branches off to carry deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart into each lung to be oxygenated.

Any PE is dangerous because clots block blood flow in one or both lungs. A large saddle PE blood clot can break off and cause multiple blockages in both lungs leading to right-sided heart failure and death.

What causes saddle PE?

The blood clot (thrombus) typically breaks off in the veins of the arms or legs (DVT) and travels to the pulmonary arteries in the lungs where it becomes lodged and blocks the flow of blood around it.

What are the signs and symptoms of saddle pulmonary embolism?

Some patients diagnosed with saddle PE don't show signs or symptoms. Signs symptoms of a saddle PE are the same as any other PE:

  • chest pain
  • shortness of breath
  • cough
  • coughing up blood-tinged sputum
  • difficulty breathing
  • rapid heart rate
  • irregular heartbeat
  • low blood pressure
  • fatigue, tiredness
  • lightheadness or dizziness
  • fever
  • cold, clammy skin
  • blue skin (cyanosis)
  • leg pain or swelling (if DVT)
  • fainting

How is saddle PE treated?

Saddle PE is treated the same way that other pulmonary embolisms are treated with blood thinners such as heparin, warfarin, and/or clot-dissolving medication. Sometimes surgery is necessary to remove large blood clots or to place a filter to trap clots.

A PE is a life-threatening condition that requires emergency medical treatment to restore blood flow to the heart/lungs before irreversible damage or death can occur.

If you believe you have a pulmonary embolism, seek emergency treatment or call 911 immediately.

Photo by Bobby Bank/WireImage

Comedian Chris Cotton died from a blood clot in his right lung and heart failure due to an enlarged heart. He was 32.

The coroner also listed "morbid obesity" among the "significant conditions" contributing to the comedian's untimely death.

"I conclude the cause of death was due to pulmonary thromboembolism right lung complicated by cardiomegaly," the medical examiner wrote in the report obtained by Radar Online.

Cotton's sister-in-law, Karen Middleton, told Radar Online that Cotton was discovered "slumped over" behind the wheel of his car. He was pronounced dead at a hospital on Wednesday, Dec. 11.

"We are all just shocked that this happened," Middleton said. "He was just going to the store to get some stuff for the baby too."

Cotton and his wife of eight years, Erica, were expecting their first child in February.

The Philadelphia comedian was best known for his stand-up comedy and he was co-host of Comedy Central's streaming talk show Every Damn Day.

The network shared the news of his death on Wednesday via Twitter.

"We're devastated by the loss of Chris Cotton -- a hilarious comedian, a beloved member of the Comedy Central family and a joy to be around. He will be missed," the network wrote.

A GoFundMe page raised over $50,000 for Cotton's family.

Morbid obesity simply means severely overweight. People who who are diagnosed with morbid obesity have a significant risk of death.

Morbid obesity is defined as 100 pounds over your ideal body weight or a body mass index (BMI) higher than 30.

Dylan Hafertepen, Jack Chapman

An Australian man died of a pulmonary emboli (silicone in his lung) after injecting silicone into his scrotum to appease his cult leader lover.

Jack Chapman, pictured right, was part of the dominance submission cult scene in Seattle, Washington. He went by the name "Pup Tank."

Chapman, 28, died in a Seattle area hospital after going into respiratory arrest from the effects of silicone embolism syndrome last month, according to the Daily Mail UK.

Dylan Hafertepen, pictured left, led an "inflation fetish" cult that requires its members to inject their scrotums with liquid silicone.

The members of the cult injected silicone to please Hafertepen, who preferred men to look swole like him.

Chapman reportedly traveled from Melbourne, Australia to the U.S. to meet Hafertepen. He eventually moved in with Hafertepen and four other men.

In a dramatic episode of 'The Project' on Tuesday, Chapman's mother, Linda Chapman, confronted Hafertepen, who traveled to Melbourne to deliver her son's ashes to her.

Ms. Chapman was visibly shaken as she ordered Hafertepen out of her house. She blamed Hafertepen for her son's death and told him to leave her home.

She described Jack as "Someone who feels so badly about themselves, someone who was vulnerable, who just wanted your love at any cost... and the cost of his life."

Hafertepen's Facebook page features photos of the muscular cult members -- all with enlarged scrotums from injecting silicone.

Hafertepen refers to the men as "his pups" or "obedient puppies" who must act in submission to win his love and affection.

In the weeks before he died, Jack allegedly changed his will, leaving his $200,000 inheritance to Mr. Hafertepen, who is pictured below left.

No charges have been filed in Jack's death.

Dylan Hafertepen

Serena Williams shrugged off a French Open ban on wearing catsuits similar to the ones she wore when she won three previous French Open titles. The tennis superstar was asked about the catsuit ban at a press conference ahead of the U.S. Open tennis tournament this week.

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R&B singer Tweet has been hospitalized with blood clots, according to published reports. The 46-year-old singer whose real name is Charlene Keys is reportedly suffering from blood clots in her lungs (pulmonary embolism).

Blood clots are potentially deadly when they block the flow of oxygen rich blood to an artery, causing necrosis (tissue death) in the lungs.

Read more »

Chris and Adrienne Bosh

Miami Heat star Chris Bosh may be sidelined for the rest of the 2015-16 NBA season with blood clots again.

According to published reports, Bosh, 31, pulled out of the 2016 NBA All-Star game in Toronto after suffering a slight calf sprain.

Calf pain is a classic symptom of deep vein thrombosis, a life-threatening condition which can cause blood clots that break off and travel to the lung.

Read more »

Barbara Dawson

A Florida woman who was forcibly removed from a hospital lay in the parking lot for 18 minutes before a doctor readmitted her. Barbara Dawson, 57, later died of a pulmonary embolism (blood clot in her lung).

Dawson's ordeal at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital in Tallahassee, Florida was recorded by police audio and dash cam video on Dec. 21.

The audio and video were released this week to the family's attorney, Benjamin L. Crump.

Read more »

Chris Bosh and son

Miami Heat center Chris Bosh will miss the rest of the NBA season after he was diagnosed with Pulmonary Embolism (blood clots in his lungs). The 30-year-old Dallas native was diagnosed with the potentially fatal blood disorder last week after complaining of chest discomfort while vacationing in Haiti with his wife, Adrienne Bosh, and Heat teammate Dwyane Wade.

Someone uploaded this photo of Bosh and his son, Jackson on Bosh's Instagram page on Saturday. The caption reads: "Thank you for all the messages, love, and support. It has truly lifted my spirits through this tough process."

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Hillary Clinton blood clot

There is sad news to report today. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton was hospitalized over the weekend with a blood clot.

A blood clot is a lump of red blood cells gelled together.

Mrs. Clinton fell at home and suffered a concussion earlier this month. She has not been seen publicly in 3 weeks. Doctors discovered the blood clot when they ran follow-up tests this weekend.

Clinton was immediately hospitalized and administered blood thinners to dissolve the clot (thrombolytics) and/or to prevent other clots from forming (anticoagulants).

Mrs. Clinton may have had a blood clot in her lung that traveled up her leg after being bedridden for 3 weeks. But the clot could have formed in her brain after she fell.

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Yesterday, celebrity gossip website TMZ.com reported that legendary rap artist Heavy D died from a blood clot in the lung (Pulmonary embolus or PE) that was caused by Deep leg vein thrombosis. That terminology is incorrect since deep vein thrombosis can occur anywhere in the body, not just the legs. The correct term is Deep Vein Thrombosis or DVT.

DVT has been in the news lately because several high profile figures have been diagnosed with it, or died recently, including Heavy D and reality TV star Tamar Braxton's husband, Vince Hebert, who survived his bout with DVT and PE.

Pulmonary embolism is usually fatal and involves a blood clot (thrombus) traveling from the legs or arms and into the lungs (PE). People at high risk for DVTs are those who live a sedentary lifestyle (couch potatoes), sit for long periods of time at cubicle desks or travel long distances on planes.

Pulmonary embolisms are often misdiagnosed as something else — such as pneumonia or cardiac arrest. There are law firms that base their entire practice around misdiagnosed pulmonary embolism cases.

Anyone can be diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis. Other risk factors that predispose people to DVTs, include pregnancy, obesity, dehydration, crushing injuries, or people with strokes or heart conditions.

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