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Nikole Hannah-Jones is refusing to teach at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill after her tenure was blocked following her controversial work on the 1619 Project.

The 1619 Project is named for the year the first African slaves were brought to the English colony of Virginia.

Nikole Hannah-Jones won a Pulitzer Prize for her work on the 1619 Project, a collection of essays, podcasts and poems developed by Hannah-Jones, writers from The New York Times, and The New York Times Magazine.

The 1619 Project "aims to reframe the country's history" by declaring the birth of the nation occurred when African slaves first arrived on America's shores.

Scholars criticized the 1619 Project, and even The New York Times disputed the date of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans.

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In this historical photo, freed slaves are pictured on the deck of the USS Vermont. The U.S. Navy hired freed slaves during the Civil War in 1861.

Last year, Hannah-Jones was invited to teach at her alma mater the UNC's Hussman School of Journalism as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism.

The Knight Chair is usually offered tenure -- a guaranteed permanent teaching position at the school.

The last two Knight Chairs were granted tenure upon their appointments.

However, Hannah-Jones was furious to learn her application for tenure had been rejected by the University Board of Trustees.

Walter E. Hussman Jr., a millionaire news mogul who donated $25 million to the journalism school named after him, was among the donors who objected to Hannah-Jones' hiring.

The donors criticized the validity of the 1619 Project and questioned Hannah-Jones's credentials.

The decision faced backlash from her peers in the new industry, students and athletes, who wrote letters supporting her.

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Instagram/Candace Owens

Candace Owens sparked controversy on Twitter.com when she dismissed Juneteenth as "lame."

The conservative activist slammed the new federal holiday that was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday, June 16.

The holiday takes effect immediately, and all government offices were closed on Friday, June 18, to observe the new holiday.

However, Candace is among Black celebrities, such as comedian D.L. Hughley, who question the speed with which Juneteenth became a holiday.

Most Black people outside of Texas had never heard of Juneteenth until President Donald Trump scheduled a rally on that same day last year.

Trump later changed the date of his rally, saying, "I did something good: I made Juneteenth very famous."

Candace took to Twitter to express her disapproval of the new federal holiday.

"Juneteenth is soooo lame.
Democrats really need to stop trying to repackage segregation.

I'll be celebrating July 4th and July 4th only.

I'm American."

"Every single race has been enslaved at some point in human history. Africans are STILL enslaved today.
This is not a holiday. This is more emotional training from Democrats to see ourselves as somehow separate from America.

Independence Day is July 4th."

"This is your daily reminder that immigrants from Africa as well as the Carribean are among the most successful ethnic groups in the country.

America doesn't discriminate against people based on skin. Black Americans are just focused on meaninglessness like 'Juneteenth'."


 

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D.L. Hughley is among the descendants of slaves in America who are side-eyeing Juneteenth becoming a federal holiday.

The comedian is among Black Americans who are on the fence about how swiftly Juneteenth became a federal holiday.

Juneteenth celebrates the day slaves in Galveston, Texas learned they were free - two years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on Sept. 22, 1862.

Most Black people outside of Texas had never heard of Juneteenth until President Donald Trump decided to hold a rally on that same day last year.

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Trump later changed the date of his rally, saying, "I did something good: I made Juneteenth very famous."

Semi-retired singer Beyonce quickly recorded a track - "Black Parade" - to capitalize on the controversy.

The very next year, Juneteenth became a federal holiday, leaving most people Googling to learn the meaning behind it.

NurPhoto via Getty Images

Many are now questioning whether Juneteenth would be a federal holiday at all if Trump had chosen a different date for his rally last year.

D.L. says Black people have been demanding reparations, justice and equality for decades, but instead got a 3-day weekend.

There's another reason D.L. and others are wary of the new holiday -- several U.S. Senators who voted for the bill are trying to block schools from teaching about critical race theory.

As he put it, it's hard to explain the holiday if critical race theory is censored.

In the end, D.L. is all for another day to BBQ, but he adds, this holiday does nothing to level the playing field.

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Black Americans who are descendants of slaves celebrated the news that Congress approved Juneteenth as a federal holiday.

However, Rep. Cori Bush, a member of "The Squad", says that's not enough.

On Wednesday, June 16, the House of Representatives approved a bill making Juneteenth, June 19, a federal holiday known as "National Independence Day."

Bush, a Democrat, is also calling for monetary reparations and "Black liberation."

"It's Juneteenth AND reparations. It's Juneteenth AND end police violence + the War on Drugs," she tweeted on Wednesday night.

"It's Juneteenth AND end housing + education apartheid. It's Juneteenth AND teach the truth about white supremacy in our country. Black liberation in its totality must be prioritized."

Fourteen Republicans voted against the measure for Juneteenth, saying another federal holiday will hurt small businesses financially.

NurPhoto via Getty Images

Juneteenth is a holiday celebrating the day African-Americans learned they had been emancipated. The holiday originated in Galveston, Texas.

Juneteenth is recognized by 48 states and Washington DC. North Dakota and South Dakota are the only states that don't recognize the holiday.

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Rapper Tip "T.I." Harris is calling for $44 trillion to be paid out as "reparations" to Black Americans who can prove they are descendants of African slavery.

T.I., 39, called for reparations during an appearance on The Breakfast Club on Thursday.

T.I. plans to sit down with Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden to make his "goal" a reality.

"This is my goal. My goal is to get every black person in America that's a descendant of slavery one million dollars, at least. That'll take about 44 trillion. So that's my goal, so I'm working up on 44 trillion."

He also called for Black ADOS to spend their money at Black businesses only.

"Everything black people spend money on, it should be a black company that provides it," he said. "If we make up for 13 percent of this nation's population, we should make up for 13 percent of the ownership of land. We should be representing at least 13, 14 percent on boards, financial institutions, and so on and so forth. That should be persistent or consistent throughout, but it is not."
 

Co-host Charlamagne tha god agreed, saying "militias" and "white supremacists" are going crazy in America.

"You spoke about the militias and the white people going crazy," said T.I. "This is only happening because they see that their position is dwindling. This is only happening because they're becoming irate, because it's becoming known that the hateful racist whites, their run is over. Period. Their run is over. The jig is up."

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The city of Asheville, North Carolina becomes the first city in America to approve reparations for the descendants of African slaves.

Officials apologized for the city's historic role in slavery and discrimination after the City Council voted unanimously to provide reparations to Black citizens on Tuesday.

"Hundreds of years of black blood spilled that basically fills the cup we drink from today," said Councilman Keith Young, one of two Black council members and the chief architect of the resolution.

"It is simply not enough to remove statues. Black people in this country are dealing with issues that are systemic in nature," Young said.

The resolution will not provide direct cash payments but it will mandate investments in areas where Black people face disparities, such as home ownership.

Black people will be given the same priorities as whites for bank loans to increase minority business and homeownership, CBS News reports.

The resolution will also close gaps in health care, education and pay for Black people.

The vote comes a month after thousands of protesters called for the Asheville Police Department to be defunded in the aftermath of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis.
 

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Beyonce Knowles surprised her fans by dropping a new track "Black Parade" to commemorate Juneteenth on June 19.

Beyonce celebrates the rich history of West African slaves in Texas who were liberated and emancipated in 1865:

    We got rhythm (We got rhythm), we got pride (We got pride)
    We birth kings (We birth kings), we birth tribes (We birth tribes)
    Holy river (Holy river), holy tongue (Holy tongue)
    Speak the glory (Speak the glory), feel the love (Feel the love)
    Motherland, motherland drip on me, hey, hey, hey
    Motherland, motherland drip on me, hey, hey, hey
    I can't forget my history, it's her-story
    Motherland drip on me, motherland, motherland drip on me

She also shouts out her loyal BeyHive fanatics on the track. "You hear them swarmin', right? Bees is known to bite."

The track is the 39-year-old singer's 2nd offering in 2020. She hopped on Megan Thee Stallion's "Savage Remix" earlier this year. With Beyonce help, "Savage Remix" peaked at #1 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart.
 

Beyonce Knowles - Black Parade

SR rated: 2/5 roses

roses
 

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Photo: Facebook

Loni Love sparked a fierce debate on social media when she said all Black men cheat due to America's history of slavery that separated families.

During Friday's episode of The Real, co-host Loni Love said Black men - particularly men with money and power - cheat with no shame because slavery broke up families.

Loni, who is dating a Caucasian man, said Black men "really don't know how to have true, faithful relationships. They think because they have money, because they have power, that they can treat women any kind of way."

She added: "Money and power does not mean you do whatever you want to do."

Loni theorizes that Black men cheat with reckless abandon because "we are still dealing with slavery and we are descendants of slavery and because our families were broken up."

New co-host Amanda Seales agreed: "It's slavery; welfare reform in the '60s and '70s..."

And co-host Adrienne Bailon said privileged Black men work harder to keep their money and power, and their hustle affects their relationships with their wives.

Hot 97 host Ebro had something to say about Loni's comments that all Black men cheat due to the history of slavery.

"Imagine that pain when you're trying to be honorable and you're doing everything right and your family doesn't believe in you.

"And Black women continue to get on these platforms talking about all men do this and all Black men do that and all Black men have these problems. And as a Black man, you're working on those problems, and you're looking at your people - these suppose to be your people going out in public thrashing you all the time."

He added: "It's not just Black men out here cheating!"

 

 

 

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