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Instagram has taken a significant step toward protecting children and teens from falling victims to depraved adults on the social media platform.

The social media site, which is owned by Facebook, will block adults from direct messaging children if the minor doesn't already follow them.

Instagram announced the new changes on Tuesday.

Minors who follow adults on Instagram will also receive notices if the adult has "been exhibiting suspicious behavior," such as sending "a large amount of friend or message requests to people under 18."

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Other prompts will remind teens not to feel pressured to respond to adults who are messaging them, according to the website.

Instagram said in order to make the new changes work, children must provide their real age when signing up for a new account.

"We require everyone to be at least 13 to use Instagram and have asked new users to provide their age when they sign up for an account for some time," the announcement reads. "While many people are honest about their age, we know that young people can lie about their date of birth."
 

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Secretary of state, Mike Pompeo says the United States is considering banning the Chinese app TikTok due to concerns over national security.

In an appearance on Fox News on Monday, Pompeo said the U.S. government may ban TikTok, which is wildly popular with American children and young adults.

TikTok is a community sharing app that focuses on dance, free-style or performance content videos created by children.

Pompeo said TikTok, which uses Huawei and ZTE technology, is a danger to U.S. national security.

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"We are taking this very seriously and we are certainly looking at it," Pompeo told host Laura Ingraham. "With respect to Chinese apps on people's cell phones. I can assure you the United States will get this one right too."

He warned TikTok users that their private data is at risk and could get into "the hands of the Chinese Communist Party."

In response to Pompeo's warnings, a TikTok spokesperson said they have "never provided user data to the Chinese government, nor would we do so if asked."
 

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Lizzo has accused popular video-sharing site TikTok of removing video clips of her wearing skimpy bathing suits that barely cover her ample curves.

The 31-year-old singer took to the app on Wednesday to share a new video of herself lip-syncing along to a song which repeatedly features the words "I know".

The clip was accompanied by text which read: "TikTok keeps taking down my videos with me in my bathing suits but allows other videos with girls in bathing suits. I wonder why?"

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Implying the videos were being snatched down because of her morbid obesity, Lizzo added: "TikTok... we need to talk" and concluded her post with a single angry-looking emoji.

TikTok has yet to respond to the "Truth Hurts" singer's allegations.

TikTok is a video-sharing app that is wildly popular with children, adolescents and teenagers. Adults have flocked to the app since that's where children are.

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It's not the first time Lizzo has faced criticism of her weight.

Fitness expert Jillian Michaels was accused of body-shaming the star last year. The trainer admitted she was unsure why people were "celebrating her body", adding: "I love her music. My kid loves her music. But there's never a moment where I'm like, 'And I'm so glad that she's overweight.'"

Update: TikTok restored Lizzo's swimsuit videos after intense pressure from the star and her social media followers.

Source: WENN.com