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Nick Cannon and ViacomCBS are on friendly terms again after he met with Jewish community leaders following his anti-Semitic outburst last month.

Variety explains ViacomCBS has "opened the door" for the disgraced comedian to work with the company again at some point in the future.

A ViacomCBS source told Variety that Chris McCarthy, president of entertainment and youth brands at ViacomCBS, praised Cannon for going on an apology tour to Jewish community centers.

The source said McCarthy and Cannon have been in touch in recent weeks, after he was abruptly terminated in July for calling white people and Jews "the true savages" who act "evil" and "rob, steal, rape, kill in order to survive" on his podcast show, "Cannon's Class,".

Speaking at a town hall with employees on Monday, McCarthy described himself as "hopeful" that ViacomCBS would "find a way" to work with Cannon again.

"I struggle with the fact that Nick, a longtime partner and friend of ours, is on this journey and we're not part of that journey," McCarthy said. He added, "I am hopeful we find a way to bring these two things together and hopefully we will have the opportunity to do that with Nick again."

Earlier this month, Cannon appeared on the American Jewish Committee's online program, AJC Advocacy Anywhere, where he apologized again for insulting the Jewish people.

He said he'd recently discovered his ancestors are Black and Jewish. "I come from a Jewish family," Cannon said, after he discovered his great-grandfather was a "Spanish rabbi."

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"My mother has been calling me every single day since this happened with so much family history," Cannon shared. He said his mother told him his "great-grandfather was a Spanish rabbi. He's a Sephardic Jewish man."

"So, as much heat as I've been catching from the public and the outside, this hit home for my family in a real way because I come from a Black and Jewish family on my mother's side," he said.

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Cannon, 39, has been very vocal in Black Lives Matter's efforts to defund the police following the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis in May.

Cannon was upset when his friends and Black Lives Matter didn't rush to his defense following the public backlash. He took to social media and hinted he might harm himself.

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Screengrab: YouTube

Nick Cannon recently discovered his ancestors are Black and Jewish. "I come from a Jewish family," Cannon said on Monday, after he discovered his great-grandfather was a "Spanish rabbi."

On Monday, Cannon appeared on the American Jewish Committee's online program, AJC Advocacy Anywhere, where he apologized again for insulting the Jewish people.

Larry Busacca/Getty Images

Cannon, left, is pictured with his mother, Beth Gardner, and media personality Al B. Sure!, at the Nickelodeon HALO Awards in 2014.

"My mother has been calling me every single day since this happened with so much family history," Cannon shared. He said his mother told him his "great-grandfather was a Spanish rabbi. He's a Sephardic Jewish man."

"So, as much heat as I've been catching from the public and the outside, this hit home for my family in a real way because I come from a Black and Jewish family on my mother's side," he said.

Cannon is still upset that his friends and fans turned on him after he apologized to the Jewish people.

In social media posts, he wrote that things "couldn't get any worse" for him, and he hinted at taking his own life after none of his A-list friends rushed to defend him.

"A lot of people may have been upset that I apologized, but I feel like that's what someone of true character is actually supposed to do when they hurt someone."

'Now, let's get through this process of truth and reconciliation," he said.

The 39-year-old comedian was fired in July after he labeled white people "savages" who act "evil" and "rob, steal, rape, kill in order to survive" on his podcast show, "Cannon's Class,".

The public fallout was swift and harsh as ViacomCBS severed longstanding ties with the comedian, taking millions of dollars in revenue with them.

Cannon's bank account took another hit as his daytime talk show, The Nick Cannon Show, was delayed until 2021 and his radio show on Power 106, Nick Cannon Mornings, is temporarily suspended.

Since making the controversial comments, Nick has met with rabbis and learned about Judaism during a visit to the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles.

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Nick Cannon is still feeling the heat after making anti-Semitic comments during an exchange with former Public Enemy member Professor Griff on the June 30 episode of his "Cannon Class" podcast.

The public fallout was swift and harsh as ViacomCBS severed longstanding ties with the comedian, taking millions of dollars in revenue with them.

Cannon's bank account took another hit as his daytime talk show, The Nick Cannon Show, has gone on hiatus and his radio show on Power 106, Nick Cannon Mornings, is temporarily suspended.

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The talk show, which was scheduled to premiere later this year, is pushed to 2021, the show's producer, Lionsgate-owned Debmar-Mercury, confirmed in a statement obtained by Variety.com.

The production company said it is "standing by" Cannon, as did Fox TV, which said it is keeping him on as the MC of The Masked Singer -- for now.

Debmar-Mercury stated Cannon could redeem himself by meeting "with leaders of the Jewish community".

On Monday, Cannon visited the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles, where he learned about the Holocaust and the millions of Jews who lost their lives in the Nazi concentration camps.

The father-of-three pledged his first paycheck from The Masked Singer to the Jewish center to continue its work.

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Cannon, 39, once known as one of the most powerful media personalities in America, was so despondent over his derailed career that he wrote a series of cryptic social media posts that sounded very much like suicide notes.

In the caption of a photo of himself and rapper Ryan Bowers, who took his own life, Cannon wrote:

"After waking up and barely rising from my own dark contemplation of continuing my physical existence on this planet, this powerful warrior actually had the balls to do it."

In an early morning tweet on July 17, he wrote: "I thought it couldn't get any worse. Then I watched my own community turn on me and call me a sell-out for apologizing. Goodnight. Enjoy Earth."

He followed up by tweeting, "Y'all can have this planet. I'm out!"

Cannon has been "counseled" by Jewish manager Guy Oseary, whose celebrity clients include Madonna and U2, according to Variety.

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Ice Cube raised eyebrows when he tweeted what appears to be anti-Semitic imagery and conspiracy theories on Twitter.com earlier this week.

The 50-year-old rapper, actor and director tweeted an image of a group of men playing Monopoly on the backs of Black people. Another image suggested that the "Black Cube of Saturn" is part of the Star of David.

Ice Cube, real name O'Shea Jackson, tweeted imagery that didn't make much sense to some of his followers -- including an image of a police officer copulating with a dog.

Cube also shared images of Egyptian statues on Wednesday that have been linked to a Russian propaganda website, according to The Daily Beast.

Many of Cube's followers asked him to take the images down, but he refused.

In response to fans and friends who believed his Twitter page was hacked, Cube wrote:

"This is CUBE. My account has not been hacked. I speak for no organization. I only speak for the meek people of thee earth. We will not expect crumbles from your table. We have to power of almighty God backing us all over the earth. NO MORE TALKING. Repent."

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Ice Cube (pictured with his wife Kimberly) has always been outspoken on social issues, particularly on the subject of police brutality. As a member of the rap group NWA, Ice Cube made headlines when he defended the group's hit song "Fuk Da Police".