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TMZ

Kevin Hart's former personal shopper was arrested on Wednesday, after allegedly defrauding the actor/comedian out of nearly $1.2 million.

Dylan Jason Syer - who was hired by Hart in 2015 - was arraigned in Queens Supreme Court, New York, on charges including grand larceny, first and second degree, criminal possession of stolen property in the first and second degree and identity theft in the first degree.

Syer, 29, allegedly used Hart's credit cards to help fund his lavish lifestyle.

Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz said Syer made over a million dollars in unauthorized purchases using the comedian’s credit cards between October 2017 and February 2019. She said the actor's credit card was given to Syer "only to make authorized purchases" on his behalf.

Syer initially started small by making authorized purchases for the actor, then he escalated to make extravagant purchases for himself and to transfer large sums of Hart's money into his personal bank accounts.

He then purchased Louis Vuitton bags, "at least 5 Patek Phillipe watches valued at more than $400,000" and a Sam Friedman painting, which he sent by FedEx to his home and business.

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Queens District Attorney's Office

He also purchased at least 16 Bearbrick collectibles dolls, clothing, shoes and jewelry, according to the D.A.

"The investigation revealed that the defendant used his business's credit card processing account to make unauthorized charges on Mr. Hart's credit card. Once those credit card charges were processed by Syer's bank, the proceeds poured into Syer's checking account," the D.A. said.

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Queens District Attorney's Office

Following Syer's arrest on Wednesday, investigators searched his home, and recovered around $250,000 in cash and other items.

Katz issued a statement, saying, "I want to send a strong message to the defendant and others who seek financial gain through the victimization of others, that my team and I are committed to aggressively pursuing these actions and separating those who commit crimes from their ill-gotten gains, and returning those funds, where practical, to support the victims.”

Syer is due back in court on February 17. If convicted, he faces up to 25 years in prison.