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Subway

A second lab analysis of Subway restaurant's tuna fish sandwich, obtained by The NY Times, failed to identify any fish DNA in the ingredients.

Months after two Bay Area residents claimed there was no fish in Subway's tuna fish sandwiches, the New York Times ordered a new lab analysis.

A federal class action lawsuit noted a laboratory analysis of the tuna fish sandwiches determined no seafood DNA was found in the ingredients.

"We found that the ingredients were not tuna and not fish," said one of two attorneys representing two plaintiffs in the lawsuit in an email to The Washington Post.

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The lawsuit claimed the "products are made from a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by Defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna."

Subway restaurant hit back at the claims that the company made "false and misleading representations about tuna being used as an ingredient."

"There simply is no truth to the allegations in the complaint that was filed in California," a company spokesperson told DailyMail.com in January.

However, a second analysis of more than five feet of Subway tuna fish sandwiches obtained by the New York Times, determined no fish DNA was found in the samples.