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Pres. Joe Biden declared war against unvaccinated Americans in a speech from the White House on Thursday.

Biden announced his "6-pronged" strategy to combat the coronavirus that has a 99.8% survival rate.
 
READ ALSO: Biden's Vaccine Mandate Excludes Illegal Immigrants
 
Federal workers will be forced to get the vaccine or lose their jobs. There is no option to take a test if they decline to get the shot.

Additionally, OSHA will fine private businesses with more than 100 employees up to $14,000 if they don't order their employees to take the shot or take a weekly Covid-19 test.

The federal vaccine mandate also ignores the millions of Americans who recovered from the virus and now have natural immunity.

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600,000 US Postal Service employees are reportedly exempt from taking the vaccines.

APWU, the powerful union that represents postal workers, announced the exemption in July.

According to the Washington Post, the USPS "is traditionally independent of federal personnel actions like this," though postal workers are "strongly encouraged to comply with the mandate."

The APWU released a statement in July:

"While the APWU leadership continues to encourage postal workers to voluntarily get vaccinated, it is not the role of the federal government to mandate vaccinations for the employees we represent."

Governors in 25 states reacted to Biden's speech by threatening to file lawsuits. The list of 25 states include Texas, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina and West Virginia.

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Gov. Brian Kemp said Biden's unconstitutional mandates would be a logistical nightmare" for businesses in Georgia. He said Biden was dividing Americans.

Kemp tweeted:

"I will pursue every legal option available to the state of Georgia to stop this blatantly unlawful overreach by the Biden administration."

And South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem tweeted:

"South Dakota will stand up to defend freedom. @JoeBiden see you in court."

Biden responded to the GOP threats of lawsuits by saying simply "Have at it."

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Georgia Governor Brian Kemp is deploying the National Guard to hospitals throughout the state to assist with the nursing shortage.

Hospitals are reporting severe nursing shortages amid a surge of Covid-19 cases and vaccine breakthrough cases in Georgia.

Nurses are quitting in droves over vaccine mandates put in place by hospitals in Georgia.

About 105 National Guard personnel with medical training have been deployed to 10 hospitals around the state, including Grady in Atlanta, Piedmont Henry in Stockbridge, and Piedmont Fayette in Fayetteville.

Last year, Covid-19-related deaths in Georgia peaked at 250 per day.

According to NBC News, as of Aug. 24, deaths in Georgia average about 50 per day for the entire state.

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Gov. Kemp watches as Kim Raymond, a nurse in the intensive care unit at Candler Hospital, left, receives a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA vaccine from R.N. Lisa Lynn.

In light of the impact of nursing shortages, some hospitals in Atlanta are reconsidering their vaccine mandates.

The Georgia Department of Public Health daily data shows 669 new hospitalizations and 71 deaths, in addition to nearly 17,000 "cases" of Covid-19 in the state.

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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp says the state will end federal unemployment payments of $300 a week beginning in June.

Kemp said the $300 weekly federal subsidies discourage the jobless from finding gainful employment. He added that the payments are "hurting our productivity not only in Georgia, but around the country."

Congress approved the extra payments in a $2 trillion stimulus package in early 2020. The federal subsidies will end in mid-to-late Jun. Federal law allows states to opt out of the program as early as June 12.

Kemp made his decision after hearing from small business owners seeking an end to the payments.

The organizations said the extra $300 weekly -- added to state benefits of up to $365 a week -- discouraged people from seeking employment.

People who should be working jobs to help stimulate the local economy are instead jetting off to exotic destinations and brawling in airports.

"This is an issue I'm getting pounded on every day by our small business owners and many Georgians," Kemp said, adding: "They need some help."

Meanwhile, employers such as McDonald's are forced to pay $50 for applicants to sit for an interview.

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Lil Yachty says the Georgia boycotts are a big waste of time because they won't change new voting laws.

New voter ID laws were put in place last month by Gov. Brian Kemp to even the playing field for Republicans.

Lil Yachty said he doesn't think boycotts in Georgia will help change "oppressive" voting laws in his home state, but he's got advice for people worried about getting to the polls.

TMZ caught up with the Atlanta rapper as he was leaving dinner at Delilah in West Hollywood, CA. TMZ asked Yachty about the impact of Major League Baseball, Hollywood film productions and other big businesses pulling out of Georgia in protest over the laws.

Corporations objected to the new voter ID law that requires identification to submit absentee ballots to vote in Georgia.

Democrats argue that IDs are "oppressive" against Black people who don't know how to apply for IDs.

Major League Baseball pulled its All-Star game out of Georgia in protest of the voter ID law. But critics pointed out that the league requires IDs to pick up season tickets.

ID is also required to get vaccinated in Georgia and other states.

Lil Yachty says the boycotts won't last forever because the Peach State is just too stubborn.

Yachty tells TMZ why he's not worried about a business exodus hurting Atlanta's economy, and he offers advice for voters.

Watch Yachty's interview below.
 

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Will Smith and director Antoine Fuqua have pulled their runaway slave movie out of Georgia due to controversial voter ID law.

Smith's new slavery film titled, Emancipation, was scheduled to begin filming on in Atlanta in June, but he is now looking for a new location.

Smith, who is starring in, as well as producing the movie, blamed "institutional racism," for his decision.

"The new Georgia voting laws are reminiscent of voting impediments that were passed at the end of Reconstruction to prevent many Americans from voting. Regrettably, we feel compelled to move our film production work from Georgia to another state."

The movie, based on a true story, will likely be filmed in Louisiana, where the actual events took place.

In the film, Smith plays a slave who escaped the plantation and joined the Union Army after he was whipped to within an inch of his life.

The historic photo of the ex-slave's scarred back, taken during an Army medical examination, became known as "The Scourged Back."

The photo was published by The Independent and Harper's Weekly in 1863, and served to embody the cruelty of slavery in America.

"It was the first viral image of the brutality of slavery that the world saw, which is interesting, when you put it into perspective with today and social media and what the world is seeing, again," Fuqua told Deadline last year. "You can't fix the past, but you can remind people of the past and I think we have to, in an accurate, real way."

Emancipation is the first film to pull out of Georgia since the new laws went into effect.

Major League Baseball pulled the All-Star game out of Georgia after Gov. Brian Kemp signed the new election bill into law in March.

The new election law requires identification to submit absentee ballots by mail.

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Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has lifted all coronavirus restrictions beginning today, April 8.

Georgia restaurants can move tables closer together and moviegoers are no longer required to socially distance in theaters.

Atlanta's nightclubs were already packed since last summer, but more people can gather together in churches and concert venues.

"As cases and hospitalizations have continued to decline, and more Georgians are being vaccinated, the Governor is continuing to protect lives and livelihoods by repealing remaining restrictions to help Georgians get back to normal," Kemp said in a statement.

Kemp was criticized by Democrats after he signed a new voter bill into law that requires voter ID to submit absentee ballots.

Kemp resisted tightening Georgia's election laws when former President Donald Trump ran for reelection in 2020.

But Democrats say Kemp is suppressing the Black vote to secure his own reelection next November.

After speaking with Stacey Abrams, Major League Baseball (MLB) moved the All-Star game from Atlanta to Colorado, where voter ID is required and election laws are even tighter.

But the league justified the move because the Black population in Atlanta is over 51% but Blacks make up only 9.2% of the population in Denver.

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Rep. Park Cannon, the Georgia lawmaker who was dragged out of the Capitol building for knocking on Gov. Brian Kemp's door, will not be charged.

Cannon was arrested on March 25 and dragged to the Fulton County (Atlanta) Jail after she knocked on Kemp's door while he signed the voter ID bill into law.

The election bill requires voter ID to request and submit absentee ballots, limits the number of ballot drop boxes, and allows the Georgia State Elections Board to take over county elections boards if there are problems with ballot counting.

Cannon's arrest sparked outrage on social media when video of her arrest went viral.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that she will not pursue charges and the case is closed.

Willis said the police officers may have found her behavior annoying," but it did not justify putting together a grand jury.

Cannon faced charges of felony obstruction and disrupting the General Assembly session. If found guilty, she faced up to high years in jail.

"My experience was painful, both physically and emotionally, but today I stand before you to say as horrible as that experience was... I believe the governor signing into law the most comprehensive voter suppression bill in the country is a far more serious crime," Cannon said at a rally last week.

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Gov. Brian Kemp signed an election bill requiring voters to submit identification to vote by mail. If Georgians choose to use their driver's license, they must provide the correct driver's license number -- or their ballots will be rejected.

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Democrats have launched a campaign to educate residents on the correct DL number to provide when submitting their absentee ballots.

Democrats are outraged over Kemp's new election law, which closes a loophole that allowed out-of-towners to submit ballots without providing an ID.

Lawmakers argue the new law is voter suppression. They say the law puts Black people at a disadvantage because they don't know how to apply for IDs.

Critics say the Democrat's argument against voter ID boils down to insulting the intelligence of black people.

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Twitter

Furious Democrats reacted to the arrest of a Georgia lawmaker who interrupted Gov. Brian Kemp's livestream announcement after he signed a sweeping election bill into law on Thursday.

The election bill requires voter ID to request and submit absentee ballots, limits the number of ballot drop boxes, and allows the Georgia State Elections Board to take over county elections boards if there are problems with ballot counting.

Democrats accused Kemp of voter suppression, while Republicans wonder why he didn't strengthen voter laws during the presidential elections in 2020 and the Senate runoffs in January.

Democrat representatives and activists gathered to protest the signing of the bill at the state capitol on Thursday.

Georgia State Representative Park Cannon (D-Atlanta) was arrested for banging on Gov. Kemp's door during his livestream announcement.

According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution:

"Cannon was with several other protesters when she knocked on Kemp’s office door, saying the public should be allowed to witness the announcement of the bill signing. The sweeping legislation requires ID for absentee ballots, limits drop boxes and changes early voting hours."

Cell phone video shows Georgia State Troopers forcibly dragging a handcuffed Cannon through the Capitol building and shoving her into a patrol car, as she yelled, "There's no reason for me to leave... I am a legislator!"

The reaction was furious on Twitter. One Twitter user wrote: "She was arrested more harshly than a white man who murdered 8 Asian women."

While another liberal tweeted: "This is outrageous. The @GOP is suppresing democracy [sic]."

And a third Twitter user wrote: "She was arrested for standing by a door! ????"

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Texas is following the standards set by wide open Florida and Georgia by reopening businesses and lifting mask mandates.

On Tuesday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced he is canceling the mask mandate and reopening all businesses in the state.

Abbott said all businesses will fully reopen starting March 10.

This is welcome news for business owners who suffered catastrophic losses during the coronavirus outbreak last year.

"Removing statewide mandates does not end personal responsibility," Abbott said. "It's just that now state mandates are no longer needed."

Texas is the largest state to lift mask mandates. Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp canceled mask mandates early last year -- despite pushback from Democratic lawmakers in the state.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis also canceled mask mandates and opened his state for business last year.

Florida and Georgia have lower death and infection rates when compared to lockdown states such as California and New York.

The CDC warned states should reopen slowly due to virus "variants" and "mutations" in the wild.