Bryan Steffy/Getty Images

Cher apologized for offending others when she suggested she could have saved George Floyd if only she'd been there to stop former cop Derek Chauvin from kneeling on him.

On Friday, April 2, she tweeted:

"Was talking With Mom & She Said 'I Watched Trial Of Policeman Who Killed George Floyd, & Cried'. I Said 'Mom, I Know This Is Gonna Sound CRAZY, But.. I Kept Thinking ... Maybe If I'd Been There ... I Could've Helped."

Aside from the weird capitalization of every first letter, Cher's assertion that she could've saved Floyd from dying was not well received.

The social media response was brutal. Twitter users taunted Cher and accused her of having a Savior Complex.

One user wrote: "Oh yay another white person centering themselves around [Black] [people] pain. I wish I was there to stop you from tweeting this... [sic]"

Another user wrote: "This might not be your intent, but you basically just called every bystander a coward in positioning yourself as the superhero who could have prevented this tragedy."

Another user advised the 74-year-old pop singer to learn from the dragging she received on social media.

She responded to the backlash by apologizing profusely.

"Wrestled With This Twt, Because I Thought some ppl wouldn't understand, Or Believe an Entertainer Could have Honest emotions about a human Being, suffering & Dying, even if It's Only Shown On tv. You Don't Know What I've Done, Who I Am, Or What I Believe. I CAN, I HAVE, & I WILL.. HELP."

Cher couldn't understand why social media users didn't see how emotional she was about Floyd's death.

"I Just got off phone With Friend Karen. Told her what Happened, & Realized, You Can Piss Ppl Off, & Hurt Them By Not Knowing Everything That’s "NOT Appropriate" To Say. I know Ppl Apologize When They're In a Jam, BUT TO GOD, IM TRULY SORRY If I Upset AnyOne In Blk Community. I Know My [heart]."

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

The 63rd Annual Grammy Awards was dubbed the "woke" Grammys and the "Pandemic Grammys" for its emphasis on politics, coronavirus vaccines, and social justice issues.

Anderson .Paak deservedly won the Grammy Award for Best Melodic Rap Performance for his critically acclaimed single "Lockdown".

The esteemed singer, songwriter and producer released his highly regarded single "Lockdown" earlier this year on Juneteenth via Aftermath Entertainment, exclusively distributed by 12Tone Music, LLC.

Inspiration for the song came from .Paak's participation in a Los Angeles Black Lives Matter protest where peaceful protestors were being shot with rubber bullets by the police.

The song was accompanied by the Grammy-nominated video directed by Dave Meyers featuring Andra Day, Jay Rock, Syd, SiR, Dumbfoundead & Dominic Fike.

.Paak is now a 4-time Grammy winner. He won Best R&B Album for Ventura (2019) and Best R&B Performance for "Come Home" featuring rapper Andre 3000. He won his first Grammy in 2019 for Best Rap Performance for his song, "Bubblin'".
 

 

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Singer/songwriter H.E.R. (right) shared Song of the Year Grammy Awards for the song "I Can't Breathe" with Tiara Thomas (left), Jeff Robinson (center) and Dernst Emile II (not pictured).

"I Can't Breathe" was inspired by the death of 46-year-old George Floyd in Minneapolis last year.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Floyd (pictured) died on May 25, 2020 when ex-cop Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck for 8 minutes as he pleaded for his life during an arrest for allegedly passing a counterfeit bill in a bodega.

Chauvin is currently on trial for murder in Minneapolis. Jury selection is still underway.

The city of Minneapolis settled a wrongful death lawsuit with Floyd's family for a record $27 million last week.

See the full coverage of the Grammy Awards here.
 

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

A Minneapolis judge has delayed the start of the trial for former police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

The murder trial, which was set to begin Monday, will start on Tuesday morning with the selection of jurors, according to MSN.com.

Judge Peter Cahill of the Hennepin County district court delayed the trial to mull over whether to reinstate the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin.

But, according to ABC News, Judge Cahill said he does not have jurisdiction to rule on whether the third-degree murder charge should be reinstated.

Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Floyd during a traffic stop in May 2020.

Photo may have been deleted

A viral video that showed Chauvin pressing his knee into Floyd's neck as he took his last breath sparked weeks of rioting, looting and unrest in Minneapolis and other Democratic stronghold states.

Black Lives Matter has been protesting outside the courthouse for days.

Minneapolis and Hennepin County officials spent at least $1 million erecting fences topped with barbed wire and other barricades around the courthouse and City Hall buildings.

BLM is calling for the quick conviction of Chauvin. One speaker led BLM in chants: "The whole world is watching!"

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Happy New Year! A special shout out goes to those of you who have stuck with me since I started my blog journey in 2007.

2020 changed our lives forever, as politicians and globalists figured out how to use fear mongering to control Americans and force their agendas.

Thanks to local lawmakers here in Georgia (Republican and Democrat) who refused to impose draconian restrictions such as lockdowns and mask mandates on Georgia residents.

Georgia is one of a handful of states that remains open during the Corona flu outbreak.

More people died from suicide, drug abuse, alcoholism and loneliness than from the pandemic itself in 2020.

As we say goodbye to 2020 and usher in 2021 with sadness and hope for a brighter future, free from tyranny and oppression, here are Sandrarose.com's most popular posts of 2020.

George Floyd made my Top 10 list twice. Floyd's death, at the knee of a Minneapolis police officer in May, became a flashpoint for Black Lives Matter riots and looting over the summer.

My number 1 most popular post in 2020 will surprise you!
 

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

10. Coroner: George Floyd Died from Combined Effects of Coronary Artery Disease and Hypertensive Heart Disease

A Minnesota medical examiner has determined that George Floyd died from the combined effects of Coronary Artery Disease, hypertensive heart disease, and a knee pressed against his neck and back. READ MORE
 

Photo may have been deleted

Photo: Robert Voets/ 2020 Warner Bros.

9. How Keyshia Cole dealt with Nick Cannon showing up 45 minutes late for her talk show (Video)

Keyshia Cole appeared on The Real daytime talk show that aired this week. Keyshia, 38, was there to promote her own talk show, One On One With Keyshia Cole. READ MORE
 

Photo may have been deleted

8. Milwaukee mass shooting gunman made multiple complaints about racism at Miller Coors brewery

A 51-year-old man who went on a shooting spree at Miller Coors brewing company in Milwaukee complained repeatedly to HR about racism and harassment in the workplace. READ MORE
 

Photo may have been deleted

Photos: ATLPics.net, Instagram

7. Open Post: Future & Lori Harvey are back on the market

Welp, that was quick. After a whirlwind courtship that included all-expenses paid trips to Dubai and exotic island locales, hip-hop's most unlikeliest couple has called it quits. READ MORE
 

Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage

6. Open Post: Pastor Jamal H. Bryant Welcomes a Son

The Rev. Jamal H. Bryant, pastor of DeKalb County's New Birth Baptist Church, welcomed a baby with a church parishioner. Update: This story was debunked. READ MORE
 

Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images

5. Open Post: Did Jeezy really slide into ex-girlfriend Jasmine Sanders' DMs?

Jeannie Mai's fiancee Jeezy has some explaining to do. His ex-girlfriend Jasmine Sanders is tired of Jeezy sliding into her DMs to rekindle their romance. READ MORE
 

Photo may have been deleted

4. George Floyd's fiancee speaks out, says people should forgive cop who killed him

George Floyd, the unarmed Black man who was killed in police custody in Minneapolis on Monday, was a "gentle giant" to those who knew him, says his fiancée. READ MORE
 

Photo may have been deleted

Photos: Chuck Kennedy/White House, WENN.com

3. Snoop Dogg apologizes for threatening Gayle King After Susan Rice Threatened to Send an Army

Rapper Snoop Dogg reluctantly apologized to television journo Gayle King after Susan Rice, Barack Obama's former national security advisor, warned him to "back off". Rice, 55, warned Snoop to "back the **** off" after the aging rapper threatened King... READ MORE
 

Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

2. CNN's Don Lemon calls out Oprah, Sean Combs, Drake for ‘sitting in their mansions doing nothing'

CNN anchor Don Lemon called out America's Black, wealthy elite for "sitting in their mansions doing nothing" while cities burned across America. READ MORE
 

Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

1. Dr. Ben Carson says 98% of coronavirus cases recover and 'we can't operate out of hysteria'

White House coronavirus task force member Dr. Ben Carson says the U.S. government can reopen the country in 3 weeks and the U.S. "can't operate out of hysteria." Carson says that 98 percent of all coronavirus cases will recover. READ MORE

Photo may have been deleted

Snapchat, Facebook

A biracial college student says he doesn't regret sharing a video of a white high school classmate uttering a racial slur because she should have known better.

Mimi Groves was excited after earning her learner's permit and was sitting in traffic when she dropped the N-bomb in a video.

Groves, who was 15 at the time, said, "I can drive, n*****s," in the video.

The high school student from Leesburg, Virginia sent her video to a friend on Snapchat, where classmate Jimmy Galligan, 18, spotted it, The Sun reports.

Galligan reportedly saved the video for a year before he posted it on social media right when he knew that Groves, now 19, had chosen to attend the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in June.

She was kicked off the University of Tennessee cheerleading squad and eventually withdrew from the school under pressure from admissions officials, according to The NY Times. They told her they'd received hundreds of emails and phone calls from outraged alumni, students and the public asking them to revoke its admission offer.

Groves, the cheerleading captain on her high school team, was mortified. She had just been accepted to the university's cheer team when the video dropped -- right around the time of the George Floyd protests.

Groves had urged her friends and followers to "protest, donate, sign a petition, rally, and do something" in support of Black Lives Matter.

One of her social media followers responded: "You have the audacity to post this, after saying the N-word."

Groves said that, at the time, she "didn't understand the severity of the word, or the history and context behind it."

"I was so young," Groves said. She added that the slur was in "all the [rap] songs we listened to, and I'm not using that as an excuse."

She said her entire family was struggling with the public shaming.

"It honestly disgusts me that those words would come out of my mouth," Groves said. "How can you convince somebody that has never met you and the only thing they've ever seen of you is that three-second clip?"

Galligan was unmoved by Groves' tearful apologies.

"I wanted to get her where she would understand the severity of that word," Galligan told the New York Times.

He added: "If I never posted that video, nothing would have ever happened" to her.

Feeling proud of himself, Galligan said he will always remember he "taught someone a lesson."

Galligan is now enrolled in his freshman year at Vanguard University in California while Groves lives at home, taking online classes at a nearby community college.

One of her friends, who is Black, said Groves apologized to her long before the video went viral.

Photo may have been deleted

Minneapolis PD

A Minnesota judge dismissed a murder charge against Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who was charged in the death of George Floyd in May.

Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill's dismissed a third-degree murder against Chauvin, who now faces two counts of second-degree murder and manslaughter.

Judge Cahill also denied defense requests to dismiss the aiding and abetting counts against three other former Minneapolis officers, Thomas Lane, J. Jueng and Tou Thao.

Chauvin was released from jail on Oct. 7 after posting a $1 million non-cash bond.

Chauvin, who was arrested on May 31, was charged in the death of Floyd, an unarmed Black man who is seen pleading for his life in a viral video.

Chauvin's defense attorney argued that his client did not intend to assault or kill Floyd during an encounter on May 25.

All four former cops are awaiting trial set for March 8, 2021.

Photo may have been deleted

Minneapolis PD

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on George Floyd's neck until he died, has been released from jail.

Chauvin was released from jail after posting a $1 million "non-cash bond" on Wednesday, Oct. 7.

The former cop posted a non-cash $1 million bond signed by A-Affordable Bail Bonds of Brainard, Minnesota around 10:34 a.m. Wednesday, FOX9 reports. He left the jail at 11:22 a.m. His current whereabouts are unknown.

Chauvin, who was arrested on May 31, had been held in segregation at the maximum security Oak Park Heights, Minnesota Prison where he was transferred following death threats from inmates at the county jail in Minneapolis.

Chauvin was charged in the death of Floyd, an unarmed Black man who is seen pleading for his life in a viral video. He was charged with second-degree manslaughter. Three other former officers who were at the scene were also arrested and have since been released.

All four are awaiting trial set for March 8, 2021.

Photo may have been deleted

Screengrab: YouTube

The "woke" cancel culture has come for the Black chef on the box of Cream of Wheat porridge mix.

B&G Foods, which owns Cream of Wheat, announced it will remove the iconic image of the Black chef from its packaging because the image of a Black chef is "racially insensitive".

The company became the latest "woke" corporation to drop a popular Black brand logo that they claim was stigmatized as a "racial stereotype" after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

B&G Foods issued a statement explaining its decision.

"For years, the image of an African-American chef appeared on our Cream of Wheat packaging. While research indicates the image may be based upon an actual Chicago chef named Frank White, it reminds some consumers of earlier depictions they find offensive."

But some Blacks accuse corporations of intentionally using the civil unrest in the U.S. to remove the iconic images of Black people from their packaging.

Soon there will be no more iconic Black images left in advertising. And some Black activists believe that's by design.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd were mobbed by protesters as they left the Hennepin County courthouse on Friday.

The four attended a pre-trial hearing where their attorneys filed motions to dismiss the charges against them. Judge Peter Cahill ruled he would not rule on the defense motions to dismiss the charges.

The judge also declined to rule on motions to combine the four cases into one trial.

Former officer Derek Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd's death on May 25.

Viral video captured Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck for over 8 minutes until he expired. The footage sparked violent protests in Minneapolis and around the country.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Three former officers J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thau and Thomas Lane (pictured above) were fired from the police force and later charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

Chauvin is the only former officer still in police custody while awaiting his murder trial.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman was disqualified from participating in the prosecution because he was present at an interview with a medical examiner, KHOU reported.

The judge also denied motions to allow two of Floyd's earlier arrests into the record to be used as evidence.

No date was given for any additional pre-trial hearings.

Photo may have been deleted

Daily Mail

George Floyd cried and pleaded with Minneapolis police not to shoot him after they tapped on his car window with a flashlight.

London's Daily Mail exclusively obtained the full 8 minutes of leaked police body cam footage that shows Floyd's arrest on Memorial Day.

The footage shows former officers Thomas Lane and Alex Kueng ordering Floyd to show both hands.

At least one officer drew his service weapon and pointed it at Floyd, who began pleading with the officers not to shoot him. "I got shot the same way before," he said, as the cops ordered him to put his hands on the steering wheel.

"Please don't shoot me Mr. officer, please don't shoot me man," Floyd said as he grabbed ahold of an officer's hand. "I just lost my mama."

Minutes later, Floyd would die an agonizing death under the knee of former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin, who is currently in jail awaiting trial.

Photo may have been deleted