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Donald Trump Jr. angered social media users when he suggested George Floyd's destroyed mural is a sign from God.

The mural was destroyed when it was struck by lightning during a thunder storm on Tuesday in Toledo, Ohio.

The mural was painted on the side of a building on the corner of Summit and LaGrange.

Speculation ran rampant that the mural was vandalized by white supremacists or pro-Trump supporters.

But witnesses say the wall bowed and collapsed after a direct lightning strike.

According to Eurweb, Donald Trump Jr. said the destruction may be a sign from God.

"This will drive some people nuts but oh well," Trump wrote in a post on Instagram. "I mean you have to wonder if someone, like a higher power, is telling us something here?!?

"Obviously what happened to George Floyd should never happen anywhere!!! That said, objectively speaking, given his history I'm not sure turning him into a deity and a role model for our children is exactly the right idea either."

Toledo's mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz said the city will work with the artist to replace the mural, "so that the message at the core of this artwork can be heard."

He added:

"We may never know for certainty why the George Floyd mural came down. It could have been an act of nature, or it could have been an act of vandalism. What we do know is that the mural will be replaced."

 

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A George Floyd mural was completely destroyed after it was hit by lightning on Tuesday in Toledo, Ohio.

The mural was painted on the side of a building on the corner of Summit and LaGrange. Witnesses confirm it was struck by lightning before the old wall collapsed.

George Floyd murals have been vandalized and defaced in other cities around the country. The mural pictured above is located in Houston, Texas.

Previous acts of vandalism led some to speculate that the mural in Ohio was also destroyed by a vandal.

Toledo's mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz told USA TODAY the city will work with Toledo's arts commission and the artist to replace the mural, "so that the message at the core of this artwork can be heard."

He added: "We may never know for certainty why the George Floyd mural came down. It could have been an act of nature, or it could have been an act of vandalism. What we do know is that the mural will be replaced."

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Hennepin County Jail

Black Twitter reacted after a Minnesota judge sentenced former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin to 22.5 years in prison for the death of George Floyd.

Floyd, 46, died on May 25, 2020 from cardiac arrest due to neck compression after Chauvin kneeled on his neck for 9.5 minutes.

Derek Chauvin, 45, was convicted on second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in April.

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On Friday, June 25, Judge Peter Cahill sentenced Chauvin to 12.5 years, plus an addition 10 years for abusing "his position of authority as a police officer, and did it in front of children."

Federal civil rights charges are still pending against Chauvin. Those charges carry their own penalties if he is convicted.

The city of Minneapolis settled a wrongful death lawsuit with Floyd's family for $27 million.

Not everyone was satisfied with the sentence on Friday. Many said Chauvin didn't receive enough time in prison.

Former ESPN journalist Jemele Hill, 45, tweeted:

"If you're wondering if Derek Chauvin's sentence is fair, Chauvin will be 60 years old when he's released from prison after serving 15 years of his 22 1/2-year sentence. George Floyd was murdered by Chauvin when he was 46. Floyd can never resume his life. Chauvin can."


 

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Minneapolis police are refusing to enter the George Floyd Autonomous Zone even when responding to homicide calls.

Shootings are a nightly occurrence in the eight blocks surrounding 38th Street and Chicago Ave, known as "George Floyd Square," where Floyd died.

Multiple Black people have been killed in the zone since its creation last September.

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In one incidence of violence, a Black woman was pushed out of a window during a domestic dispute. Despite her severe injuries and profuse bleeding, police refused to accompany paramedics inside the zone.

"Is it possible to have her move at least a block away, maybe [to] 38 and 10th?" asked the police officer in audio of the 911 call.

The 911 dispatcher replied, "She is bleeding and cut everywhere, but we'll call her back and ask her to move a block away."

Another shooting resulted in the death of a pregnant Black woman late last month. Leneesha Columbus was shot in the zone. Despite her serious injury, police refused to go into the zone.

"We'll meet at 34th and Elliot, see if we can get the victim extracted to a closer location to us. And no lights or sirens, please," an officer told dispatch. When police finally extracted her from the zone, Columbus was pronounced dead.

Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Imaz Wright and a second victim, both Black women, were shot during a gang-related incident on March 6th.

Police were told that the victims would be carried to them at the edge of the zone. Wright died before she could receive medical treatment.

Business owners and residents, many of them black, have pleaded with the police to enter the zone because they fear for their lives. The merchants feel abandoned by the police and the city.

"The city left me in danger," Alexander W, owner of the Smoke in The Pit restaurant, told the New York Post last month. "They locked us up in here and left us behind."

Some of the business owners created a GoFundMe page for donations to help them survive in the zone. So far, the account has raised over $13,000 of the stated $400,000 goal.

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Minneapolis PD, Facebook

Former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts in the death of George Floyd in Minnesota.

The jury sent word to the judge that a verdict had been reached after 12 hours of deliberations on Tuesday afternoon.

Floyd died on May 25, 2020 when Chauvin kneeled on his back and neck for 8 minutes.

The National Guard moved into downtown Minneapolis ahead of the verdict announcement. Black Lives Matter activists threatened to burn the city down if the verdict was not guilty.

Floyd's death touched off protests, riots and mayhem in Democratic strongholds around the country.

Three former Minneapolis officers are awaiting trial in Floyd's death.

AFP via Getty Images

The judge presiding over the Derek Chauvin murder trial in Minnesota slammed congresswoman Maxine Waters' "abhorrent" behavior in open court on Monday.

Chauvin faces life in prison if found guilty of first degree murder in the death of George Floyd.

AFP via Getty Images

Waters, a Los Angeles congresswoman, traveled to Brooklyn Center, Minnesota to "incite violence" if Chauvin is acquitted of murder.

Judge Peter Cahill responded to a defense request for a mistrial over the comments made by Waters.

Chauvin's defense raised concerns with the judge over the impact the congresswoman's inflammatory words may have over the jury.

The judge had strong words for Ms. Waters before denying the defense's request for a mistrial.

The judge said Waters' words may be enough to overturn any guilty verdict on appeal.

"Congresswoman Waters may have given you something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned," Cahill said.

Cahill slammed Waters' behavior as "abhorrent" and "disrespectful".

"I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case," said Cahill, "especially in a manner that is disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch and our function."

He added that "if they want to give their opinions, they should do so in a respectful way and in a manner that is consistent with their oath to the Constitution, to respect the co-equal branch of government."

He continued: "Their failure to do so I think is abhorrent, but I don’t think it's prejudiced us with additional material that would prejudice this jury. They have been told not to watch the news. I trust they are following those instructions and that there is not in any way a prejudice to the defendant beyond the articles that were talking specifically about the facts of this case."

Waters responded to the controversy on Monday morning, telling theGrio.com that the "KKK and other white supremacists" are blowing her words out of proportion.

“Republicans will jump on any word, any line and try to make it fit their message and their cause for denouncing us and denying us, basically calling us violent ... any time they see an opportunity to seize on a word, so they do it and they send a message to all of the white supremacists, the KKK, the Oath Keepers, the [Proud] Boys and all of that, how this is a time for [Republicans] to raise money on [Democrats] backs,” Waters said.

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Cher apologized for offending others when she suggested she could have saved George Floyd if only she'd been there to stop former cop Derek Chauvin from kneeling on him.

On Friday, April 2, she tweeted:

"Was talking With Mom & She Said 'I Watched Trial Of Policeman Who Killed George Floyd, & Cried'. I Said 'Mom, I Know This Is Gonna Sound CRAZY, But.. I Kept Thinking ... Maybe If I'd Been There ... I Could've Helped."

Aside from the weird capitalization of every first letter, Cher's assertion that she could've saved Floyd from dying was not well received.

The social media response was brutal. Twitter users taunted Cher and accused her of having a Savior Complex.

One user wrote: "Oh yay another white person centering themselves around [Black] [people] pain. I wish I was there to stop you from tweeting this... [sic]"

Another user wrote: "This might not be your intent, but you basically just called every bystander a coward in positioning yourself as the superhero who could have prevented this tragedy."

Another user advised the 74-year-old pop singer to learn from the dragging she received on social media.

She responded to the backlash by apologizing profusely.

"Wrestled With This Twt, Because I Thought some ppl wouldn't understand, Or Believe an Entertainer Could have Honest emotions about a human Being, suffering & Dying, even if It's Only Shown On tv. You Don't Know What I've Done, Who I Am, Or What I Believe. I CAN, I HAVE, & I WILL.. HELP."

Cher couldn't understand why social media users didn't see how emotional she was about Floyd's death.

"I Just got off phone With Friend Karen. Told her what Happened, & Realized, You Can Piss Ppl Off, & Hurt Them By Not Knowing Everything That’s "NOT Appropriate" To Say. I know Ppl Apologize When They're In a Jam, BUT TO GOD, IM TRULY SORRY If I Upset AnyOne In Blk Community. I Know My [heart]."

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The 63rd Annual Grammy Awards was dubbed the "woke" Grammys and the "Pandemic Grammys" for its emphasis on politics, coronavirus vaccines, and social justice issues.

Anderson .Paak deservedly won the Grammy Award for Best Melodic Rap Performance for his critically acclaimed single "Lockdown".

The esteemed singer, songwriter and producer released his highly regarded single "Lockdown" earlier this year on Juneteenth via Aftermath Entertainment, exclusively distributed by 12Tone Music, LLC.

Inspiration for the song came from .Paak's participation in a Los Angeles Black Lives Matter protest where peaceful protestors were being shot with rubber bullets by the police.

The song was accompanied by the Grammy-nominated video directed by Dave Meyers featuring Andra Day, Jay Rock, Syd, SiR, Dumbfoundead & Dominic Fike.

.Paak is now a 4-time Grammy winner. He won Best R&B Album for Ventura (2019) and Best R&B Performance for "Come Home" featuring rapper Andre 3000. He won his first Grammy in 2019 for Best Rap Performance for his song, "Bubblin'".
 

 

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Singer/songwriter H.E.R. (right) shared Song of the Year Grammy Awards for the song "I Can't Breathe" with Tiara Thomas (left), Jeff Robinson (center) and Dernst Emile II (not pictured).

"I Can't Breathe" was inspired by the death of 46-year-old George Floyd in Minneapolis last year.

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Floyd (pictured) died on May 25, 2020 when ex-cop Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck for 8 minutes as he pleaded for his life during an arrest for allegedly passing a counterfeit bill in a bodega.

Chauvin is currently on trial for murder in Minneapolis. Jury selection is still underway.

The city of Minneapolis settled a wrongful death lawsuit with Floyd's family for a record $27 million last week.

See the full coverage of the Grammy Awards here.
 

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

A Minneapolis judge has delayed the start of the trial for former police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

The murder trial, which was set to begin Monday, will start on Tuesday morning with the selection of jurors, according to MSN.com.

Judge Peter Cahill of the Hennepin County district court delayed the trial to mull over whether to reinstate the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin.

But, according to ABC News, Judge Cahill said he does not have jurisdiction to rule on whether the third-degree murder charge should be reinstated.

Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Floyd during a traffic stop in May 2020.

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A viral video that showed Chauvin pressing his knee into Floyd's neck as he took his last breath sparked weeks of rioting, looting and unrest in Minneapolis and other Democratic stronghold states.

Black Lives Matter has been protesting outside the courthouse for days.

Minneapolis and Hennepin County officials spent at least $1 million erecting fences topped with barbed wire and other barricades around the courthouse and City Hall buildings.

BLM is calling for the quick conviction of Chauvin. One speaker led BLM in chants: "The whole world is watching!"

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Happy New Year! A special shout out goes to those of you who have stuck with me since I started my blog journey in 2007.

2020 changed our lives forever, as politicians and globalists figured out how to use fear mongering to control Americans and force their agendas.

Thanks to local lawmakers here in Georgia (Republican and Democrat) who refused to impose draconian restrictions such as lockdowns and mask mandates on Georgia residents.

Georgia is one of a handful of states that remains open during the Corona flu outbreak.

More people died from suicide, drug abuse, alcoholism and loneliness than from the pandemic itself in 2020.

As we say goodbye to 2020 and usher in 2021 with sadness and hope for a brighter future, free from tyranny and oppression, here are Sandrarose.com's most popular posts of 2020.

George Floyd made my Top 10 list twice. Floyd's death, at the knee of a Minneapolis police officer in May, became a flashpoint for Black Lives Matter riots and looting over the summer.

My number 1 most popular post in 2020 will surprise you!
 

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10. Coroner: George Floyd Died from Combined Effects of Coronary Artery Disease and Hypertensive Heart Disease

A Minnesota medical examiner has determined that George Floyd died from the combined effects of Coronary Artery Disease, hypertensive heart disease, and a knee pressed against his neck and back. READ MORE
 

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Photo: Robert Voets/ 2020 Warner Bros.

9. How Keyshia Cole dealt with Nick Cannon showing up 45 minutes late for her talk show (Video)

Keyshia Cole appeared on The Real daytime talk show that aired this week. Keyshia, 38, was there to promote her own talk show, One On One With Keyshia Cole. READ MORE
 

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8. Milwaukee mass shooting gunman made multiple complaints about racism at Miller Coors brewery

A 51-year-old man who went on a shooting spree at Miller Coors brewing company in Milwaukee complained repeatedly to HR about racism and harassment in the workplace. READ MORE
 

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Photos: ATLPics.net, Instagram

7. Open Post: Future & Lori Harvey are back on the market

Welp, that was quick. After a whirlwind courtship that included all-expenses paid trips to Dubai and exotic island locales, hip-hop's most unlikeliest couple has called it quits. READ MORE
 

Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage

6. Open Post: Pastor Jamal H. Bryant Welcomes a Son

The Rev. Jamal H. Bryant, pastor of DeKalb County's New Birth Baptist Church, welcomed a baby with a church parishioner. Update: This story was debunked. READ MORE
 

Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images

5. Open Post: Did Jeezy really slide into ex-girlfriend Jasmine Sanders' DMs?

Jeannie Mai's fiancee Jeezy has some explaining to do. His ex-girlfriend Jasmine Sanders is tired of Jeezy sliding into her DMs to rekindle their romance. READ MORE
 

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4. George Floyd's fiancee speaks out, says people should forgive cop who killed him

George Floyd, the unarmed Black man who was killed in police custody in Minneapolis on Monday, was a "gentle giant" to those who knew him, says his fiancée. READ MORE
 

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Photos: Chuck Kennedy/White House, WENN.com

3. Snoop Dogg apologizes for threatening Gayle King After Susan Rice Threatened to Send an Army

Rapper Snoop Dogg reluctantly apologized to television journo Gayle King after Susan Rice, Barack Obama's former national security advisor, warned him to "back off". Rice, 55, warned Snoop to "back the **** off" after the aging rapper threatened King... READ MORE
 

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2. CNN's Don Lemon calls out Oprah, Sean Combs, Drake for ‘sitting in their mansions doing nothing'

CNN anchor Don Lemon called out America's Black, wealthy elite for "sitting in their mansions doing nothing" while cities burned across America. READ MORE
 

Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

1. Dr. Ben Carson says 98% of coronavirus cases recover and 'we can't operate out of hysteria'

White House coronavirus task force member Dr. Ben Carson says the U.S. government can reopen the country in 3 weeks and the U.S. "can't operate out of hysteria." Carson says that 98 percent of all coronavirus cases will recover. READ MORE