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Floyd Mayweather Jr. won a legal victory when a NY judge tossed out a lawsuit filed by a jeweler who claimed he refused to pay a $400,000 bill.

According to court documents obtained by RadarOnline.com, a federal judge dismissed the lawsuit brought by Eric & Co Trading Company.

The jeweler claimed Mayweather showed up at one of its pop-up events in Miami and took a treasure trove of jewelry with the promise to pay later.

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Eric & Co, said Mayweather walked away with a gold Cartier diamond bracelet, a $34,000 diamond necklace, a $12,000 "iced out choker", 3 custom white gold "TMT" pieces, a $20,000 diamond/emerald cut butterfly necklace, a diamond tennis bracelet and other items.

The total price tag for the items came to $389,550 plus tax, Radar Online reports.

The day after the event, Eric & Co. emailed an invoice to Mayweather who confirmed he received it.

The jeweler made multiple attempts to collect the outstanding amount from Mayweather.

The jeweler said Mayweather is a regular customer and it never had an issue with the boxer paying his bills on time.

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Eric & Co said they served Mayweather's girlfriend with a lawsuit at the fighter's Miami mansion.

The case dragged on for months and Mayweather didn't show up in a NY court for the hearing.

A New York judge tossed the case out because it was brought in the wrong jurisdiction. The lawsuit should have been filed in Florida where the alleged theft occurred.

No new lawsuit has been filed in a Florida court, Radar Online reports.

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Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot allegedly hurled obscenities towards city lawyers during a tense city council meeting.

The meeting was arranged to decide whether to remove a Christopher Columbus statue from the city.

According to a new lawsuit filed by a former Chicago Park District attorney, Lightfoot allegedly berated and defamed lawyers during a February 23 city council meeting.

Lightfoot accused the lawyers of making "some kind of secret agreement with Italians," according to the Chicago Tribune which reviewed the transcript of the meeting.

Lightfoot, a male-identified lesbian, looked at the men in the room and said: "My dick is bigger than yours and the Italians, I have the biggest dick in Chicago."

Lightfoot ordered the removal of the statue during racial unrest following the killing of George Floyd by a former police officer in Minneapolis.

The 59-year-old Ohio native shares an adopted daughter, Vivian, with her life partner, Amy Eshleman, a former Chicago Public Library employee.

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Kanye West is being sued in federal court for failing to pay nearly 1,000 members of his Sunday Service revivals.

Kanye faces two class action lawsuits totaling $30 million in penalties for failure to pay members and crew of his Sunday Service revivals, according to multiple reports.

Complicating the rap producer's legal troubles is the fact that he obtained $2 million in federal Covid-19 relief funds in 2020 -- specifically to pay his performers and crew.

According to Page Six, the two cases were filed in Los Angeles separately for 500 performers and over 300 crew members.

Lawyers representing the plaintiffs have asked them to reach out to others who provided services for Kanye, but did not get paid.

"They've got hundreds of people on board already," a source told the UK Sun newspaper. "They're talking to many, many others who want to be a part of it. People are very upset how they were treated, saying it's their worst experience," the source added.

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A Detroit man is suing a bank for calling the police when he went to deposit settlement checks from a race discrimination lawsuit.

Sauntore Thomas, 44, alleges TCF Bank accused him of check fraud because the bank couldn't verify checks he tried to deposit as part of his lawsuit settlement.

Thomas, who is Black, received an undisclosed amount from Enterprise Rent a Car to settle a May 2018 lawsuit.

He filed a lawsuit on Wednesday after what he calls a "hellish experience" being questioned by police in front of bank customers - while two more Detroit police officers guarded the door outside, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Thomas is seeking unspecified damages and an apology from TCF Bank. The bank claims it was only following protocol when there is a large deposit made.

The bank filed a police report alleging Thomas committed bank fraud. TCF Bank claims the watermark on the checks indicated the checks were fraudulent.

Thomas wasn't arrested and no charges were filed, the NY Daily News reported.

A spokesperson from the Livonia Police Department told the Free Press that the checks could not be verified because they weren't payroll checks.

An emailed copy of the settled lawsuit from Thomas' attorney, Deborah Gordon, didn't resolve the dispute, nor did conversations with Gordon, the cops and bank personnel.

"Obviously, assumptions were made the minute he walked in based on his race," attorney Gordon told the Free Press.

"It's unbelievable that this guy got done with a race discrimination case and he's not allowed to deposit the checks based on his case? It's absolutely outrageous."

Gordon, who is Caucasian, said "banking while Black" should not have been viewed as a crime.

"This is just another classic example of what it's like living your life as a Black male," she told BuzzFeed News. "The checks are for real. Why was there an issue? Why could you not verify them? You're a bank, after all - it's your job to verify checks."

The bank issued a swift apology for the experience Thomas had at their banking center. "Local police should not have been involved. We strongly condemn racism and discrimination of any kind," TCF Bank said in a statement to the Free Press.

"We take extra precautions involving large deposits and requests for cash and in this case, we were unable to validate the checks presented by Mr. Thomas and regret we could not meet his needs."

Thomas closed his account at TCF Bank and deposited the checks at another bank - where they cleared in 12 hours.

"I want to be vindicated," Thomas told the Free Press. He said he feared being arrested that day because he knows what happens to men with dark skin who don't toe the line.

"I feel very intimidated because I knew that if I would have gotten loud, they would have had me on the ground for disturbance of the peace," he said.

"I didn't give them any type of indication that I was getting upset. I wanted to make sure I stayed as levelheaded as possible, because I wasn't going to be the next person on the ground saying, 'I can't breathe.'"

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Lizzo is not playing with people who seek to profit from her success as a singer/songwriter. The 31-year-old Detroit native filed legal action against two songwriters who claimed she stole the lyrics to her No. 1 hit "Truth Hurts".

Songwriting team Justin and Jeremiah Raisen accused the "Juice" singer of stealing the line "I just took a DNA test and found out I'm 100% that bitch". They later confessed they stole the lyric from Black British rapper, Mina Lioness, for a song called "Healthy".

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Lizzo took offense to the claims that she stole the lyrics from them. "There was no one in the room when I wrote 'Truth Hurts,' except me, Ricky Reed, and my tears," she wrote on Instagram. "That song is my life, and its words are my truth."

Lizzo added that the line in question was inspired by a meme she spotted on social media that was in turn inspired by a Twitter post by singer Mina Lioness that read, "I did a DNA test and found out I'm 100% that bitch."

Lizzo said she added Mina's name to the song credits as co-songwriter so she can get paid.

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Lizzo's attorney, Cynthia Arato, confirmed to Pitchfork that she filed a lawsuit this week on the singer's behalf.

"Today we filed a lawsuit on Lizzo's behalf to establish, in a court of law, that the Raisens are not writers of ”Truth Hurts” and have no right to profit from the song's success. The Raisens did not collaborate with Lizzo or anyone else to create the song, and they did not help write any of the material that they now seek to profit from, which is why they expressly renounced any claim to the work, in writing, months ago, as the lawsuit makes abundantly clear. Although it is all too commonplace for successful artists to be subjected to these type of opportunistic claims, it is nevertheless disappointing that Lizzo had to take this step to put an end to the Raisens' false claims and their campaign of harassment."

'90s singer CeCe Peniston also accused the morbidly obese singer of plagiarizing her "Ya ya ee" ad-libs from her house music hit "Finally".