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Damian Lillard called out online trolls for poking fun at a viral photo of former teammate Caleb Swanigan.

The photo went viral because of Caleb's weight gain a year after he left the NBA. One Twitter user posted the photo along with the caption: "How the hell does one go from this to that in a year?????"

Damian took offense to the trolling. "If you're gonna post this shit with real concern then that's cool. But don't ask "how does one go from this to that", he's clearly having some real life issues."

Damian urged people to have sympathy because Caleb struggled with obesity issues his entire life. He weighed as much as 400 pounds as a child. And his father weighed 500 pounds at the time of his death when Caleb was only three years old.

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Caleb, 24, was a Portland Trailblazer for two years until he was traded to the Sacramento Kings in 2019. He returned to Portland in early 2020 and is currently a free agent.

The image went viral after Caleb pleaded guilty to marijuana possession in an Indiana courtroom on Monday.

He was arrested on Dec. 23 by a Columbia City Police officer who smelled marijuana during a traffic stop in northern Indiana.

Police found 3.4 pounds of marijuana, drug paraphernalia and $3,415 in cash inside his car.

Caleb was given a 180 day suspended sentence with two days time served.

The former Purdue University basketball standout was voted Mr. Basketball in 2015. He was affectionately called "Biggie" by his friends and family.

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Instagram/@lizzobeeating

Are you morbidly obese? Do you think your twerking skills are under appreciated? If the answer to both questions is yes, Lizzo wants you to take part in her new reality TV series on Amazon Prime.

Fresh off her first Grammy win, the rotund pop star has announced a plus-size competition reality show with Amazon Prime, in which contestants will compete for the chance to accompany her on tour as a member of her twerk crew.

Lizzo, 32, says she is looking for plump dancers "who have for far too long been underrepresented and under-appreciated."

"Where are all the big girls? That's what I want to know," Lizzo said in an Instagram video announcing the show.

"So me and Amazon are going to find out," the pop star continued. "I'm developing an unscripted show with Amazon to find my next crew of big girl dancers and models. So bring yourself, and that ass."

She captioned the video:

"Are you a full-figured dancer or model? Have you felt underrepresented and under appreciated? THEN I'M LOOKIN FOR YOU! It's time to find my dream team of beautifully talented big grrrls and @amazonstudios is helping ya grrrl on this journey!

We are casting NOW so head to BigGrrrls.com to apply. @AmazonPrimeVideo – it's time to change the game!"

 

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A new study suggests the coronavirus mRNA vaccines may not be as effective when administered to obese people.

So far, only 15% of the U.S. population has been vaccinated against Covid-19. Of that number, less than 1% are Black.

The CDC even has a term for it: Black vaccine hesitancy.

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According to the news media, the vaccines are "safe and effective." Yet obese Black women are dying within hours after receiving their vaccine doses. A majority of Black women who reportedly died after receiving the vaccines are obese.

A new study out of Italy found that Pfizer's vaccines may be less effective in obese people who received both doses.

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute Regina Elena determined that obese people produced only half of the antibodies compared with people with a normal body mass index (BMI).

"Since obesity is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality for patients with Covid-19, it is mandatory to plan an efficient vaccination program in this subgroup," the study's authors wrote.

In addition to obesity, other risk factors for Covid-19 include respiratory disorders, heart disease, diabetes, HIV and smoking.

Researchers say further studies are needed to determine why the vaccines are less effective for obesity people.

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Comedienne, actress and "Windy City Live" contributor Erica Faye Watson has died. She was 48.

The Chicago native's brother said she died Saturday after she was diagnosed with Covid-19. Her cause of death was not confirmed by a coroner, but Watson was morbidly obese.

Morbid obesity is a risk factor for Covid-19, along with respiratory disorders (such as asthma); heart disease, diabetes, smoking and HIV.

Watson died in Jamaica where she moved during the Covid-19 breakout in the United States in 2020.

She was a contributor on ABC7's Windy City Live, and appeared in the Oscar nominated film "Precious" and “ChiRaq."

"Erica was loved and adored by just so many people. She had such a vibrant, vivacious spirit," her agent, April Williams, told WBBM. "I really hope and am praying that she knew what a gem to Chicago she was and how proud we were of her."

She also hosted "Night Cap with Erica" as "Miss Poundcakes" on her YouTube channel. She talked about Black Americans who have made their exit from America and moved to Jamaica permanently on her "BLAXIT to Jamaica" episode (see below) and join their private BLAXIT Facebook group.
 

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Instagram

Lizzo responded to the public backlash after she shared her juice detox cleansing "diet" with her social media followers.

The 32-year-old pop star, who was slammed by fat feminists as "fatphobic", insists her detox cleansing diet isn't "for a dramatic weight loss".

Addressing her fans, Lizzo said:

"Your body is perfectly yours, even if it ain't perfect to anybody else. If you only knew the complexities your body possesses you would be so proud of it.

"I'm so proud of you. For making it this far in a society that gives us a head start into self-loathing, that hands us a dysmorphic mirror and leaves us desperate to catch up with who we think we should be."

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Instagram

In one Instagram post, she shared a photo of herself, nearly naked, standing on a balcony.

Lizzo, who was previously happy with her morbid obesity, said:

"I've spent so much time in this body and I am no different than you — still struggling to find balance, still trying to mend my relationship with food, my anxiety, my back fat. It gets easier. I've spent my hardest days trying to love me."

In another post, the "Truth Hurts" hitmaker wrote: "I detoxed my body and I'm still fat. I love my body and I'm still fat. I'm beautiful and I'm still fat. These things are not mutually exclusive."

Lizzo addressed the criticism over her detox diet:

"To the people who look to me, please do not starve yourselves. I did not starve myself. I fed myself greens and water and fruit and protein and sunlight. You don't have to do that to be beautiful or healthy. That was my way. You can do life your way. Remember, despite anything anyone says or does DO WHAT YOU WANT WITH YOUR BODY."

 

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You can't please everyone. So-called "fat feminists" are furious with singer Lizzo after she embarked on her weight loss journey without seeking their permission.

Full-figured women who are happy in their bodies took to social media to rebuke the 32-year-old pop star after she confessed to hating her body and despising how she looked in a mirror.

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In a TikTok video Lizzo said, "I came home, and I took my clothes off to take a shower, and I just started having all of these really negative thoughts about myself. Like, you know, 'What's wrong with me?'... 'Why am I so disgusting?' and hating my body."

Fat feminists on Twitter called Lizzo out and accused her of being "fatphobic."

One Twitter user wrote:

"The problem here now, is that fatphobics and horrible people will now use Lizzo's weight loss as a tool to further shame and abuse fat women who are happy in their bodies."

In a now-deleted tweet, user Leah wrote:

"my heart hurts with all my fat peers today. even though she won't say it and will probably try to excuse it, I'm sorry that @lizzo did that to us. we are worthy and what she posted was so f***ed. if you are triggered and upset by it I and right there with you."

Leah, who is Caucasian, apologized after Black Twitter descended on her timeline and attacked her -- as if morbid obesity is a Black thing.

One Black Twitter user wrote: "stay out of black folks business."

Another user wrote: "girl remove that blm photo from ur header and while ur at it stay [out] of blk folk business. foreva!!"

A third user tweeted:

"STAY OUT OF BLACK FOLKS BUSINESS IN GENERAL. Youre not an ally, youre a undercover enemy. Selfish, controlling, only care about BW when they're fat or fir your agenda I guess. Youre just like these Republican WM and its people just like you that gives libs a bad rep."

Leah responded to the criticism:

"The biggest thing is that I am genuinely sorry, and I had no idea just how much I was feeding into the racism of Black women being so highly scrutinized and held to such high standards. I should’ve, I can, and I will do better."

AFP via Getty Images

Lizzo is just like you. The "Juice" singer admits she is still struggling with body image issues and negative thoughts. She's in a depressing head space so close to Christmas.

Speaking in a video to fans on TikTok, she said:

"I came home, and I took my clothes off to take a shower, and I just started having all of these really negative thoughts about myself. Like, you know, 'What's wrong with me?' 'Maybe everything, all the mean things people say about me are true.' And, you know, 'Why am I so disgusting?' and hating my body. I'd normally have some positive thing to say to get out of this (but I didn't this time). And that's OK, too. I think these are normal. They happen to everybody. They happen to the best of us. We are the best of us. I can only hope that it changes for the better. But I know I'm beautiful. I just don't feel it. But I know I'm going to get through it."

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Meanwhile, Lizzo previously admitted fame "puts a magnifying glass" on her negative thoughts.

She shared:

"You can be the coolest, most richest person ever and it doesn't buy you f**king happiness. Money doesn't buy you happiness. Fame only puts a magnifying glass on the s**t that you already have. And if that s**t is f**ked up, you're just going to have even more magnified f**ked up s**t in situations where it doesn’t even seem valid or like you're even like supposed to feel that way and so it f**ks you up even more because you feel super f**king ungrateful."

Fans pleaded with Lizzo to seek help. The holidays can be the most depressing time of the year for many Americans.

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Lizzo has come out against commercializing the body positive movement, which seeks to decrease the stigma surrounding obesity.

The "Juice" singer, who is morbidly obese, is a huge advocate for self-love and body positivity. But in a recent chat with Vogue magazine she admitted she believes the movement calling for the acceptance of all bodies has been partially misappropriated.

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"It's commercialized," she said. "Now, you look at the hashtag 'body positive,' and you see smaller-framed girls, curvier girls. Lotta white girls. And I feel no ways about that, because inclusivity is what my message is always about.

She continued: "I'm glad that this conversation is being included in the mainstream narrative. What I don't like is how the people that this term was created for are not benefiting from it."

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The "Good As Hell" rapper said the body positive movement excludes morbidly obese women like herself who don't fit the mainstream standard. Lizzo says obesity is beautiful and she is proof of that.

"Girls with back fat, girls with bellies that hang, girls with thighs that aren't separated, that overlap. Girls with stretch marks. You know, girls who are in the 18-plus club..."

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Lizzo went on to state she wants to "normalize" her morbid obesity "and not just be like, 'Ooh, look at this cool movement. Being fat is body positive.' No, being fat is normal.

"I think now, I owe it to the people who started this to not just stop here. We have to make people uncomfortable again, so that we can continue to change. Change is always uncomfortable, right?"

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Instagram.com

Pop singer/rapper Lizzo shared a powerful TikTok video clip blasting all those who criticize her for her looks and her body size.

"Hey, so I've been working out consistently for the last 5 years and it may come as a surprise to some of y'all that I'm not working out to have your ideal body type," she says over videos that show her working out intensely.

"I'm working out to have my ideal body type and you know what type that is? None of your f**king business! Because I am beautiful, I am strong, I do my job, and I stay on my job," she said.

Lizzo went on to curse out each and every hater who don't look in the mirror before they criticize others.

"So next time you want to come to somebody and judge them, whether they drink kale smoothies or eat McDonald's or workout or not workout, how about you look at your own f**king self and worry about your own goddamn body because health is not just determined on what you look like on the outside, health is also what happens on the inside. And a lot of y'all need to do a f**king cleanse for your insides. Namaste, have a great day."

Lizzo has been mocked and teased relentlessly on social media for not having a slim, curvy body like other singers in her field.

The 32-year-old star admitted she's depressed and sometimes cries herself to sleep due to the excessive bullying. She has considered deleting her social media accounts, but the draw to social media is too powerful to let go.

In her hit song "Truth Hurts," Lizzo said "why food great 'til I gotta lose weight." The singer has ramped up her exercise and dieting routines - but not to appease others. To inspire others to eat healthy and workout so they can live long, healthy lives.
 

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A new study has revealed why morbidly obese people are more at risk for dying from Covid-19.

The study shows morbidly obese people are at high risk of dying from Covid-19 because their fat cells produce more of a protein that the virus needs to infect human cells.

Fat cells express more ACE2 receptors, which doctors say may explain why obese people are more at risk of dying from Covid-19.

The coronavirus attaches to ACE2 receptors that provide pathways into human cells. Researchers and epidemiologists have known for some time that the coronavirus infects people who have more ACE2 receptors. European white women have the least level of ACE2 receptors.

For instance, more men die from coronavirus than women. That is because men express more ACE2 in their testicles. Biological women don't have testicles.

The study collected data from hospitalized patients.

A separate study found that 66% of hospitalized patients were infected while at home on quarantine.

Doctors fear that restrictions such as sheltering at home may cause the infection to spread faster between family members than if they were outdoors.