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The House passed a standalone bill to boost stimulus checks from $600 to $2000 for struggling Americans under the CASH ACT.

The House voted 275-134 to increase the coronavirus relief checks to $2,000. Two House Democrats voted NO to increase direct payments to $2,000.

The bill now heads to the Senate where Republicans hold the majority.

Last week, House Republicans rejected President Donald Trump's demand to increase the $600 stimulus checks to $2,000 in the $900 billion Covid relief bill.

On Sunday night, Trump signed the Covid-19 relief package -- with $600 checks -- into law.

Trump issued a statement afterward saying he signed the pork-filled package to restart unemployment benefits and a federal ban on evictions, as well as to avoid a government shutdown.

In addition to calling on Congress to pass $2000 checks, Trump also called on Congress to eliminate Big Tech's protections under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act and to investigate incidents of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election.

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President Donald Trump signed the Senate Democratic's pork-filled $900 billion coronavirus relief package into law on Sunday night.

The package includes $600 stimulus checks for qualified Americans and some non-citizens. Trump issued a statement afterward saying he signed the pork-filled package to restart unemployment benefits and a federal ban on evictions, as well as to ward off a government shutdown.

He urged Congress to approve his demand for $2000 stimulus checks to struggling Americans.

Trump also called on Congress to eliminate Big Tech's protections under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act and to investigate incidents of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election.

The Democrats plan to vote on a separate, standalone bill to boost stimulus checks to $2000 on Monday, Dec. 28 at 3 p.m.

Senate and House Republicans have rejected a previous proposal to increase the checks to $2000.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer agreed to President Donald Trump's demand to increase the paltry $600 direct payments to $2,000 per American or he would refuse to sign their $900 billion pork-filled Covid-19 relief package.

If Trump signs the bill this week, some Americans may receive $6,000 for a family of three or $10,000 for a family of 5 in direct payments before Christmas.

The 5,593-page legislation was criticized by both Republicans and Democrats for providing only $600 per American while giving billions of dollars to corporations, lobbyists and foreign entities (read the pdf here).

In a video statement on Tuesday evening, Trump called the Covid relief package a "disgrace", saying it contained tons of pork-barrel checks to corporations, lobbyists and foreign countries, while providing only $600 to Americans who have suffered through lockdowns and evictions.

"Congress found plenty of money for foreign countries, lobbyists, and special interests, while sending the bare minimum to the American people who need it," Trump said.

Some of the pork contained in the bill includes $453 million to Ukraine, $700 million to Sudan, $10 million to Pakistan for "gender programs", and tens of millions to the Smithsonian and Kennedy Arts Centers - neither of which are open to the public.

Pelosi called the $600 direct payments "significant", but she changed her tune when Trump called her out on Tuesday.

"Republicans repeatedly refused to say what amount the President wanted for direct checks. At last, the President has agreed to $2,000-Democrats are ready to bring this to the Floor this week by unanimous consent. Let's do it!" Pelosi tweeted on Tuesday night.

"We spent months trying to secure $2,000 checks but Republicans blocked it," Schumer tweeted. "Trump needs to sign the bill to help people and keep the government open and we're glad to pass more aid Americans need. Maybe Trump can finally make himself useful and get Republicans not to block it again."

Neither Schumer or Pelosi admitted that Trump blocked their earlier proposals because of the massive payments to Democrat states that allowed rioters and looters to burn down their cities over the summer.

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President Donald Trump is refusing to sign the pork-filled Covid-19 relief package that the House and Senate adopted on Monday.

The 5,593-page legislation was criticized by both Republicans and Democrats for providing only $600 per American while giving billions of dollars to corporations, lobbyists and foreign entities.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called the $600 direct payments "significant."

Referring to the Covid relief bill as a "disgrace," Trump demanded that the $600 direct payments be increased to $2,000 per eligible American.

"Congress found plenty of money for foreign countries, lobbyists and special interests, while sending the bare minimum to the American people, who need it, “ Trump said on Tuesday evening.

"I am asking Congress to amend this bill and increase the ridiculously low $600 to $2,000, or $4,000 for a couple," as well as "immediately get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation."

The legislation, which Trump said "nobody in Congress has read because of its length and complexity," was made public just hours before the House and Senate vote on Sunday.

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After weeks of negotiations, Congress has finally reached an agreement on a $900 billion Covid relief package that includes $600 for each adult and child.

The deal also includes an additional $300 per week in unemployment benefits and $25 billion to extend the eviction moratorium into 2021 to keep unemployed renters in their homes.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer issued a joint statement on Sunday night.

"Today, we have reached agreement with Republicans and the White House on an emergency coronavirus relief and omnibus package that delivers urgently needed funds to save the lives and livelihoods of the American people as the virus accelerates.

"The House will move swiftly to pass this legislation immediately, so it can quickly be sent to the Senate and then to the President’s desk for his signature. With the horrifying acceleration of daily infections and deaths, there is no time to waste.

"We are going to crush the virus and put money in the pockets of the American people..."

As part of the agreement, Democrats have secured provisions that include:

  • Accelerating vaccine distribution, specifically to communities of color
  • Direct payment checks worth up to $600 per adult and child
  • Additional $300 a week unemployment insurance
  • $25 billion for rental assistance
  • Strong support for small businesses
  • $284 billion for 1st and 2nd forgivable PPP loans
  • $15 billion for movie theaters, live venues, arts centers
  • $9 billion for minority deposit institutions (MDIs)
  • Tax credit to employers offering paid sick leave to employees
  • Tax credit to help keep workers in jobs
  • $13 billion in increased SNAP and child nutrition benefits
  • $82 billion in funding for schools, colleges
  • $10 billion for child care assistance to keep child care providers open
  • Alex Wong/Getty Images

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell stalled negotiations on a $900 billion Covid-19 aid relief package during a Senate session on Friday.

    McConnell's staff told reporters the GOP leader won't support $160 billion in aid for Democrat stronghold states that allowed rampant riots and looting over the summer.

    Following a rare Senate session on Friday, McConnell said he will not support funding for local and state governments in Democratic strongholds.

    McConnell's staff say he sees "no path to an agreement" on a "liability shield" for companies and organizations facing potential Covid-19 lawsuits by employees who contract the virus on the job.

    Lawmakers proposed a slimmed down version of the liability shield -- in exchange for funding for blue states and local governments, but McConnell won't budge.

    McConnell criticized "controversial state bailouts" during a speech in the Senate. It's a point that he and President Donald Trump both shared.

    Trump insisted on a fresh round of $600 stimulus checks for Americans. But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi refused.

    Trump also proposed an extra $300 a week for Americans on unemployment -- half of the $600 a week they received earlier this year, but Pelosi wouldn't go for that either.

    Another pressing issue is government funding to avoid a government shutdown on Saturday.

    The next deadline for a vote on Covid-19 relief aid is December 18. Unemployment benefits for most unemployed Americans are set to expire by the end of this month.

    Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin moved $455 billion in unspent stimulus money into a fund that can't be touched without congressional approval, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday.

    The move leaves Mnuchin's potential successor, Janet Yellen, with only $80 billion in relief funds that she can access immediately.

    The $455 billion includes unspent money that should have gone to stimulus checks and small businesses as loans and grants. The funds will be deposited into the Treasury's General Fund, which can't be touched without legislative approval.

    Legislative experts say the move can be reversed by Congress next year.

    Ernie Tedeschi, a policy economist at Evercore ISI, called Mnuchin's decision "a dangerous move" as "we're about to kick off millions of people from unemployment insurance."

    The Treasury Department did not immediately respond to a request from Bloomberg for comment.

    Getty Images/Tetra images RF

    Americans who receive an extra $600 in federal unemployment benefits in addition to state benefits may get an extension after the extra $600 ends next month.

    Some unemployed Americans receive a windfall of $1,000 a week when they collect an additional $600 in unemployment benefits on top of state benefits.

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    The extra $600 was part of the $2.2 trillion stimulus package known as the CARES Act that President Trump signed into law in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

    Some lawmakers are considering extending the additional $600 in federal benefits next month, but other say the extra $600 creates "a disincentive to return to work."

    There are three proposals on the table for the next round of stimulus funding. Two of the proposals would allow Americans to continue receiving the extra $600 a week.

    But one proposal calls for a return-to-work bonus to motivate people to return to work.

    Republican Sen. Rob Portman, from Ohio, says extending the $600 weekly benefits past July would be a disincentive to return to work if Americans receive more money than they would if they were working.

    The most recent unemployment report shows that 2.5 million Americans went back to work last month -- a sign that economies are rebounding as states reopen.

    Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    A second $1,200 stimulus check is on the way to Americans who qualify, President Trump's economic advisor Kevin Hassett said.

    Hassett says the federal government will issue a second stimulus check to qualified Americans as the U.S. economy attempts to recover from the coronavirus pandemic.

    "I think it's coming sooner rather than later, Hassett told CNN on Friday.

    A second round of stimulus checks was included in the House Democrats' $3 trillion relief package. But the bill was dead on arrival on the Senate floor last week.

    Hassett cautioned that there was a possibility of double-digit unemployment in November.

    "We are getting back to normal," Hassett told CNN.

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also believes that American people and businesses will need another injection of financial support as the coronavirus pandemic eases.

    "I think there is a strong likelihood we will need another bill," Mnuchin said on Thursday. "We're going to step back for a few weeks and think very carefully if we need to spend more money and how we're going to do that."

    SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

    Nancy Pelosi announced a new $3 trillion stimulus package on Tuesday that contains billions in tax cuts and other cash freebies for the wealthy.

    The bill also includes billions for "mandatory" vaccines and mail-in ballots to vote from home in November.

    More than 30 million Americans have been let go from their jobs amid the coronavirus shutdown. The stimulus bill will provide up to $6,000 in cash direct to families and a second round of $1,200 checks to individuals -- some of whom are still awaiting the first round of checks.

    But, as usual, the wealthy will profit from the Democrats' new HEROES Act.

    The House Speaker is accused of "sneaking" tax cuts for the rich into the proposed bill, as well as allowing high-income earners to pawn off part of their state and local tax burden onto lower income workers.

    The package includes billions for "mandatory" Covid-19 vaccines and $3.6 billion will go toward helping election officials prepare to count the 200+ million mail-in ballots the Democrats hope to send out.

    Additionally, the bill includes a 15% increase for food stamps for illegal immigrants, $200 billion in "hazardous pay" for essential workers, and $175 billion in housing assistance for illegal immigrants and low-income wage earners.

    Pelosi responded to criticism from lawmakers who say the new stimulus bill is stuffed with pork for the rich.

    "To those who would suggest a pause, I would say the hunger doesn't take a pause, the rent doesn't take a pause," Pelosi said on Monday.

    A House vote is expected on Friday. But Senate Republicans say they will not approve the package because they are in no rush to add more trillions to the federal budget deficit.

    SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

    Nancy Pelosi unveiled a new $3 trillion aid package with massive new spending for city, state and tribal governments impacted by the coronavirus shutdowns.

    The new round of stimulus aid called the Heroes Act will include up to $6,000 cash direct to families and $200 billion in "hazard pay" for essential front line workers like medics, police and firefighters.

    The package will offer another round of $1,200 checks to individuals who qualify. But 20 million Americans say they still have not received their checks from the IRS since checks went out in April.

    The House Speaker announced the new spending bill on Tuesday after meeting with House Democrats. "We must put more money in the pockets of the American people," she said Tuesday afternoon.

    Majority Leader Steyn Hoyer said Congress needs to act to approve the new aid package. "This is an unprecedented time in our history," he said.

    The House is expected to vote on the new stimulus package on Friday.

    But Senate Republicans are not planning to vote on any new stimulus bills until June, after a Memorial Day recess.

    Photo by Yana Paskova/Getty Images

    The Democrat-controlled House of Representatives approved President Donald Trump's $2 trillion economic stimulus package on Friday, March 27.

    The vote came a day after the Senate voted unanimously to approve the legislation. The president is expected to sign the bill quickly.

    The package includes $1,200 checks to individuals who earn less than $75,000 a year. Individuals who file as "head of household" will receive $1,200 checks if they earn less than $150,000 a year.

    Couples earning up to $150,000 a year will receive $2,400. Families get an additional $500 for each child.

    The bill also includes an increase in the maximum unemployment benefit to individuals by $600 a week for four months.

    But not all lawmakers were happy with the bill's passage. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez lashed out at Republicans for refusing to give $1,200 checks to immigrants who don't have Social Security numbers.

    She tweeted on Thursday:

    "To clarify, $1200 checks are ONLY going to some w/social sec numbers, NOT immigrants w/ tax IDs (ITINs). Thanks to GOP, these checks will be cut off the backs of *taxpaying immigrants,* who get nothing. Many are essential workers who pay more taxes than Amazon."

    AOC's Twitter followers ripped her to shreds.

    One Twitter user responded: "Time for them to go home! There's no jobs here for them! Time to put Americans first!!"

    Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images

    After days of arguing back and forth, the Senate finally reached a bipartisan agreement on President Donald Trump's $2 trillion economic stimulus package deal early Wednesday.

    The bill contains checks ranging from $1,200 to $4,500 for individuals and small business owners. Families will receive an additional $500 for each child.

    Checks for $1,200 will be sent directly to taxpayers who earned less than $75,000 a year in 2018.

    But before you start spending money you haven't received yet, Tamar Braxton's fiancé, David Adefeso is sharing financial advice on his Instagram account.

    The stock market is soaring on the news of the economic stimulus deal. David thinks you should take some of that federal money and invest it for your future.
     


     

    View this post on Instagram

    Small businesses including retailers, restaurants, real estate and personal care professionals, comprise the largest employer pool in the U.S. They are also some of the hardest hit during this shutdown because many haven’t built up enough cash reserves to account for the plunge in revenues they are currently experiencing, with no end in sight. Mass furloughs and layoffs by small businesses could drastically drive up the unemployment rate and cause consumer spending to plunge precipitously, thereby extending the inevitable recession. To make loans cheaper the Federal Reserve reduced interest rates to close to zero and Congress is currently debating measures to aid small businesses, including loan guarantees. For those who need immediate assistance, a growing list of programs exist to help small businesses, including emergency funding from the government, protection from eviction and business loan deferment. The Small Business Administration’s website (www.sba.gov) is a good place to start for information on some of these programs. “Together We Stand; But Divided We Fall”.

    A post shared by David Adefeso (@david.adefeso) on

    Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    Millions of Americans who were counting on receiving coronavirus relief checks from the federal government next month are out of luck.

    The Democrats delayed President Trump's coronavirus economic stimulus bill in a Senate vote on Sunday night.

    The vote came while at least five Republican senators were in self-quarantine after coming in contact with infected colleagues such as Kentucky Senator Rand Paul.

    The bill includes relief checks that range from $1,200 to $4,500 to help individuals and small business owners who are financially impacted by the virus.

    Corporations and individuals earning over $99,000 in 2018 are not eligible to receive help from the government.

    Many Democrats complained that the relief bill did not go far enough to provide healthcare and unemployment aid for Americans.

    The Democrats also pushed for food security aid, small business loans and said that three months of unemployment insurance offered was insufficient.

    After the vote failed, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ripped into the Democrats, accusing them of backing out of a partisan agreement after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer intervened.

    McConnell claimed Pelosi, who is a multimillionaire, took "a week off" and "poured cold water on the whole process."

    He said the Senate will re-vote on the massive $1 trillion stimulus bill on Monday afternoon.

    Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    President Donald Trump is considering sending individuals and small business owners checks ranging from $1,000 to $4,500 to help lessen the financial impact of the Coronavirus on the economy.

    The Trump administration seeks $850 billion for a stimulus package to stimulate the economy amid unprecedented responses to the Coronavirus outbreak in America.

    The stock market, tourism and airline industries all suffered huge losses as a result of the virus hysteria.

    The Trump administration will also defer payments to the IRS by pushing back the deadline for making income tax payments from April 15 to July 15.

    Trump will meet with Congress to seek approval for the package, including checks for $1,000-$4,500 paid directly to all Americans except millionaires and billionaires.

    "Americans need cash now," said Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin at a White House press briefing on Tuesday. "We want to make sure that Americans get money in their pocket quickly. We're looking at sending checks to Americans immediately.

    "We don't need to send people who make $1 million a year checks," Mnuchin said. "We're going to preview that today and we're going to talk about details afterward."

    "The president wants to put money in the economy now. If there are small business that can't make payroll, those businesses will cease to exist."

    If Congress approves the stimulus package, the checks will be in the mail in April.