Phamous / BACKGRID

Jeannie Mai pulled out of Dancing with the Stars after falling ill with epiglottitis, an infection of the throat.

The 41-year-old TV personality left the reality TV competition series after seeking medical attention for the potentially life-threatening inflammatory condition that can cause swelling and block airflow to the lungs, ABC reported on Monday.

Symptoms of epiglottitis are fever, sore throat, difficulty swallowing, or difficulty breathing.

Phamous / BACKGRID

"My doctors discovered a health concern with my throat which requires immediate attention and surgery," she said in a statement to Good Morning America.

"I am heartbroken that my DWTS journey has to end here. I have pushed myself to new limits physically and mentally, and I am so proud of how far we’ve come."

Jeannie was competing with professional dancer Brandon Armstrong on the show and, following her sudden departure, producers have opted to only eliminate one couple from the show this week.

"Jeannie has inspired us, along with millions of fans, with her energy and dedication," they added in a statement. "We wish her a full and speedy recovery. Since Jeannie had to withdraw from the competition, tonight’s show will feature the eight remaining couples and a single elimination."

Rapper Nelly, Selling Sunset's Chrishell Stause, Backstreet Boys singer AJ McLean and Disney Channel actress Skai Jackson are among those competing in the current 29th season.

Photo: Zerbor/Getty Images

What is Sepsis?

Sepsis is a life-threatening immune response to an infection. Sepsis occurs when an infection somewhere in the body -- the skin, lungs, urinary tract, etc. -- triggers a strong inflammatory immune response that causes the blood vessels to leak, leading to low blood volume, multiple organ failure, and death.

What Causes Sepsis?

Sepsis is most commonly caused by a bacterial infection. But it can also be caused by a virus, fungus or protozoan infections in the brain, urinary tract, skin and abdominal organs.

The most common causes of sepsis is trauma, surgery, or an invasive procedure such as dental work.

Dentists normally prescribe antibiotics before a dental appointment to decrease the bacteria in the mouth. If the patient is not prescribed antibiotics, the bacteria that normally resides on teeth and in the gums can enter the bloodstream, travel to the heart and colonize the heart valve. The patient usually doesn't know he is sick with a deadly infection in his heart until months later.

Without quick treatment, sepsis can lead to heart damage, organ failure and death.

Signs and Symptoms

Signs and symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Rapid breathing
  • Cough
  • Low blood pressure (septic shock)
  • Shaking chills
  • Shortness of breath
  • Increased heart rate
  • Pain or discomfort
  • Cold, clammy (wet) skin
  • Confusion
  • Low urine output
  • Risk Factors

    Risk factors include young or old age, or weak immune system caused by diabetes, cancer, trauma, or burns. Sometimes children and the elderly will show no symptoms or the fever is low grade.

    Sepsis is a medical emergency. If you think you have sepsis or if you feel sick days after having surgery or an outpatient procedure such as dental work, call your doctor or healthcare provider.

    Always ask the doctor of healthcare provider: "Do you think this could lead to sepsis?"

    Educate yourself so you know which questions to ask your doctor or healthcare provider.

    Use WebMD's symptoms checker. Remember that most symptoms should fit a familiar pattern so the doctor can properly diagnose you.

    This has been your Medical Minute.
     

    More Info On the Web

    What is Sepsis? | CDC.gov

    Sepsis | Healthline.com

    Signs and Symptoms of Sepsis | Mayo Clinic
     

    DISCLAIMER

    Any medical information published on this blog is for your general information only and is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice. You should not take any action before consulting with your personal physician or a health care provider. Sandrarose.com and its affiliates cannot be held liable for any damages incurred by following information found on this blog.