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Rapper T.I.'s daughter, Deyjah, sparked debates on social media when she complained about inheriting her dad's 4c hair texture.

Deyjah wears expensive lacefront wigs with artificial baby hairs to cover her natural texture because she is unhappy with the look and feel of her kinky 4c hair texture.

Prince Williams/Wireimage

She took to social media on Saturday to share her struggle with her hair.

"i hate to say/admit it, buttttt ): I'm so sad that i have my dad's hair texture ): sad because it's so much to deal with/ manage ugh. sad because i feel like it just doesn't fit me nor is this texture one that’s appreciated or uplifted as much as the other hair textures."

"anytime i see someone with type 4 hair, i ALWAYS compliment them because i know how it feels to genuinely NOT like your hair/texture. i never want anyone to feel like that. it looks soooo bomb on other people, but me? yeah no."

Rob Rich/WENN.com

4c hair is tightly coiled, densely packed curls that reverts quickly to its unrelaxed state when exposed to humidity.

Some Black women wear their natural 4c hair in braids or twists which they call "protective styles."

Deyjah wears expensive lacefront wigs that resemble bone straight Caucasian or Asian hair because she is unhappy with the texture and the look of her natural hair.

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Instagram

Deyjah covets women with bone straight hair like her stepmom, Tiny Harris.

The 20-year-old Gemini snapped back when one Twitter user mocked her for thinking she's light skinned so she should be blessed with wash-and-wear hair.

"I feel like it doesn't suit me"... ie: I'm lightskinndedd how dare the ni**a gods curse me like this."

"actually no lol. i didn't even mention my skin color nor would i (being that it has nothing to do with hair texture)... obviously what you just said was a projection of possibly how YOUUUU feel about yourself."

But other women who also have 4c aka "nappy" hair sympathized with Deyjah.

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You ladies who are fans of TikTok and YouTube star Sir Cruse will be shocked to learn he is 54 years old, not 29.

For years, Cruse's fans believed he was in his 20s because of his youthful appearance.

Sir Cruse posted a short TikTok video to clear the air about his age, confessing that he is 54, 29. He called out Google for publishing misleading information about his birthdate.

"Hey, hey, hey Google where do y'all get this s**t from... men?" Sir Cruse says. "I'm 54. Where do y'all get 29? I was born 1965, November 9th."

"That's why you shouldn't believe everything you see on internet," he told his followers.

Cruse is a hairstylist - and former SR Morning Wood - who uploads videos teaching Black men how to brush train their waves to achieve that perfect 360 curl pattern.

Sir Cruse teaches young Black males to groom themselves to look handsome and presentable for the ladies. This type of mentorship is what's missing in the Black community today.

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YouTube

Cruse is best known for such videos titled "How to Brush 360 Waves Guide" and "Wave Products and Haircutting Tools."

Cruse, who began uploading videos in 2009, is a graduate from DeVry University with a degree in computer engineering.

Sorry ladies, he's taken. Cruse has been dating Jazzy Glimmer.
 

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A former Oklahoma Christian University recruiter who was fired for conducting a multicultural exercise at a high school says his reputation is destroyed.

Cedric Sunray, who is American Indian, conducted the exercise at Harding Charter Preparatory High School during a Feb. 24 assembly.

Sunray was let go within an hour after he lined up students based on their skin color and hair texture.

He said 'OK, everyone now line up from darkest to lightest skin complexion," said Korey Todd, who is in the 11th grade.

"He told us nappiest hair in the back straighter hair in the front," said 11th grader Rio Brown.

"I am embarrassed and ashamed and I am mad at what happened," said Oklahoma Christian University President Jon deSteiguer. He said he planned to visit the high school to speak with the students on Friday.

But Sunray defended his exercise, saying he was teaching how the students will be "valued and warranted" by society.

Sunray told News 4 that he conducted the same exercise 87 times this year. He called the exercise an "icebreaker."

"It's about breaking down all those walls," he said.

"I break the groups into four teams and then I say line up darkest to the front and lightest to the back," Sunray said. "From the largest afro to the tightest braid to the blondest with blue eyes. They all want to know they are valued and warranted. And that is what I provide."

Sunray said the negative press coverage destroyed his reputation as a college recruiter.

"It destroyed my reputation but my character won't change," he said.

Sunray tells News 4 that he already has a new job lined up at another metro university.

Wen asked if he would conduct the exercise again, he answered "Oh yes."

"I have been doing this exercise for years. We need to have these conversations."

He said the only thing he would do differently is give a more detailed explanation of the exercise upfront.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley had a lot on her mind the day the Democrats voted to impeach President Donald Trump in December. She told The Root that she lost the last of her hair the night before the vote.

"I was completely bald. And in a matter of hours, was going to have to walk into the House Chamber ... and cast a vote in support of articles of impeachment. And so I didn't have the luxury of mourning what felt like the loss of a limb. It was a moment of transformation, not of my choosing."

Pressley's personal struggles with Alopecia began last fall when she noticed "sinks full of hair" every morning.

Pressley, 45, said she learned she had bald patches on her scalp while getting her hair retwisted. She wore custom lacefront wigs and head wraps to conceal her shame.

She said she lost the last bit of hair at a pivotal time, while juggling her responsibilities on Capitol Hill.

After voting to impeach Trump, Pressley fled the House chamber to hide her shame in a bathroom stall.

"I felt naked, exposed, vulnerable. I felt embarrassed. I felt ashamed I felt betrayed," she said.

Pressley revealed her bald head in her interview with The Root.

Alopecia is patches of hair loss or balding on the scalp caused by tension, pulling, excessive heat for styling tools, fungal and biological infection.

Black women are affected more than any other race or ethnicity due to the stress put on our scalps by hair styles including tight braids and hair extensions applied with glue or sewn in. Also, Black stylists using blow dryers on high heat burns the scalp. Some blow dryers can heat up to 500 degrees!

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A Texas schools superintendent is under fire for telling a woman to cut her grandson's dreadlocks or put him in a dress for wearing his hair too long.

The unusual demand was made after the school notified the grandmother that her grandson was in violation of the school's dress code.

Randi Woodley and parents of children attending a Texas school say the school board altered the dress code to discriminate against Black children.

"I went to the principal's office, where she explained to me that my grandson's hair was too long," Woodley told KETK.

Woodley said she attended the school board meeting where she addressed the restrictive dress code with Tatum Independent School District's superintendent.

"He told me that I could either cut it, braid it and pin it up or put my grandson in a dress and send him to school and, when prompted, my grandson must say he's a girl," Woodley said.

The school district's policy states: "No ponytails, ducktails, rat-tails, male buns or puffballs are allowed on male students. ALL male hair of any type SHALL NOT extend past the top of a t-shirt collar, as it lays naturally."

But Woodley says the dress code targets Black boys like her grandson who wear dreadlocks past their collars.

Parent Kambry Cox told KETK that her son thinks something is wrong with his dreadlocks.

"With my son's dreadlocks, sometimes they do fall in front of his face, so I felt it would be easier to put his hair up, but then that's a problem," Cox said.

If you are a Black woman who lives and works in the corporate environment in New York City, you can now wear your natural textured hair to work without fear of retribution.

NYC guidelines now make it illegal to discriminate against people of African descent who wear their natural curly textured hair to work.

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