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Kenya Moore urged her social media followers to love their natural hair in a new campaign for her hair care products line.

The 50-year-old former Miss USA wears long hair extensions for convenience, but she wants her fans to love their natural hair that they were born with.

The Real Housewives of Atlanta cast member shared a post on Instagram, which she tagged #MooreHairMonday.

"Aside from being Founder and CEO of my 100% #BlackOwned company, my most important job is being a mother," she wrote in the caption of an ad for her Kenya Moore Haircare line.

She poses in the ad with her 2-year-old daughter, Brooklyn.

"My daughter Brooklyn is the face of @kenyamoorehair because her happiness embodies the power of a dream and hard work. God is good.

Thank you for supporting US. And thank you @sallybeauty for believing in our company and the customers for making us a top selling brand.

50% off of #mooreedges and #MooreHairSupplements now at #kenyamoorehair.com #mooretocome #Hair #realhair #love #blackhistorymonth #RHOA."

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YouTub

Kenya silenced the haters who say she doesn't have long hair growing from her scalp.

She shared a YouTube video that showed her real hair which is thinning at the ends but still long and healthy.

Kenya wears hair weave products because she's an entertainer, but she only wears extensions to protect her real hair - which is still healthy and voluminous.
 

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Tessica Brown regrets sharing her hair-raising Gorilla Glue story on social media.

Brown became a minor celebrity overnight -- racking up 700,000 followers on Instagram -- after she shared her story about spraying Gorilla Glue in her hair.

Tessica said she took her story online to seek help and not for clout, cash and glory -- as many have suggested.

She tells Entertainment Tonight that she's "over it".

"The reason I went to the internet because I was never going to take this to social media [but] the reason I took it to social media was because I didn't know what else to do," she explained. "I knew somebody out there, somebody, could have told me something. I didn't think for one second it was going to be everywhere."

When asked how she's dealing with public scrutiny that she made up the story about spraying glue in her hair, Brown denied it was a publicity stunt.

"Again, it never was -- who in they right mind would have just said, 'Oh, let me just spray this on my head and I'm going to become famous overnight?' Never. Who would want that?"

Asked if she regretted it, Brown replied, "Definitely. I told my son today, I wish I could just, I mean, go back. Because I'm over it."

Brown denied a TMZ report that she'd hired an attorney to pursue a lawsuit against the maker of Gorilla Glue.

"No, I've never ever said that," she said. "Again, I don't know where all of this is coming from. Because, at this point, everybody is saying it."

Watch the full interview below.
 

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A Louisiana woman who sprayed Gorilla Glue in her hair is suing the maker of Gorilla Glue after emergency room staff were unable to remove the hardened adhesive.

Tessica Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair was stiff as a board after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Sources tell TMZ that Brown spent 22 hours in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana, where staff used acetone, the ingredient in nail polish remover, in a failed attempt to remove the superglue.

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YouTube, Instagram

The source said the acetone burned her scalp and softened the glue to a sticky and gooey consistency before it hardened right back up again. She lost quite a bit of hair during the procedure.

Brown was given nail polish remover pads and a bottle of sterile water to take home. She was told to keep trying to remove the glue at home.

All other remedies failed to remove the glue -- and now Brown is in danger of going bald.

The source tells TMZ Brown retained a lawyer to discuss her options and to determine if she has a legal case against Gorilla Glue.

The product label warns against using the superglue in eyes, on skin (including the scalp) or clothing.

But Brown claims the label was "misleading" and didn't specifically state that the spray can't be used on hair.

Brown claims she thought the spray would be safe to use on her hair because the label said "multi-use."

A GofundMe page raised $9,000 for hair weave products and wigs for Brown who will probably lose all of her hair.
 

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YouTube

A Louisiana woman who went viral after using Gorilla Glue spray in her hair sought treatment in an emergency room over the weekend.

Tessica Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair wouldn't move after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Gorilla Glue is an ultra strong superglue product meant for bonding various nonporous materials such as metal and steel.

"My hair has been like this for about a month now. It's not by choice. Noooo," she said, before explaining that she used Gorilla Glue spray after she ran out of her holding spray.

"Y'all, look: My hair, it don't move. You hear what I'm telling you? It. Don't. Move. I've washed my hair 15 times and it don't move!"

On Saturday, Brown posted photos of herself in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana.

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YouTube, Instagram

The ER doctor gave her packets of nail polish remover pads and a bottle of sterile water. She captioned a photo of the medical supplies: "This is really about to be a long process."

Her decision to seek treatment came after the maker of Gorilla Glue offered advice.

The company told TMZ that Brown could use rubbing alcohol on her head — but warned that if it had actually been in place for a month, her hair was "likely fractured at the root," meaning she will go bald.

Don't try this at home kids.

Watch the original video below.
 

Gallo Images via Getty Images

Protesters forced the closure of hundreds of pharmacies in South Africa after it ran a hair advertisement that many South Africans deemed racist.

The Clicks pharmacy advertisement featured pictures of African hair labeled as "dry and damaged," while an image of Caucasian hair was described as "fine and flat."

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Clicks.co.za

Opposition party Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) called the adverts "racist" and "dehumanizing."

EFF leader Julius Malema organized protests outside the Clicks stores and called for all Clicks to be closed.

The company has threatened legal action against EFF, but Mr. Malema urged his supporters to be "combat ready" and said EFF wouldn't be "intimidated by threats."

"The implications of this are that black identity exists as inferior to the identity of white people. It is an assertion that white standards of beauty are to be aspired to and features of black represent damage, decay and abnormality," the EFF said in a statement obtained by Yahoo News.

Videos shared on Twitter shows some stores closed while others are guarded by security. In one incident, a bottle filled with a flammable liquid was thrown inside a Clicks store. Another video shows protesters pulling items off shelves in one store.

But demonstrations have been largely peaceful. "We are confronting white arrogance decisively. #clicksmustfall," EFF tweeted on Tuesday.

Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage

With the city on lockdown and hair salons closed for over a month in many states, actress La La Anthony decided to make her own deep conditioner to moisturize her long tresses.

The mother-of-one whipped up her own DIY (do it yourself) deep conditioner at home, according to the NY Post's Page Six.

"I have been mixing caster oil and avocado," said the 40-year-old actress. "I just really got into the henna mask [as well]. I never even knew about that before and my hair has been doing really good. I'm hoping this is something I can keep up with."

La La is fortunate to have her own on-set stylist, but the coronavirus pandemic has forced women like La La to return to their roots and maintain their own locks in their kitchens.

"I wash my hair like every two or three days now because I'm working [out] and get sweaty," she continued. "I'm not able to do that [in] my regular life because I'm so busy."

The "Power" actress added that taking a break from professional styling has done wonders for her hair.

"I'm not putting any heat on my hair. I condition it and keep it healthy. It's nice just to let it breathe and rest. Same thing with my nails. I just popped them off a while ago, and I think my nails are thanking me. Everything is getting a rest."

Watch the video below to learn how to mix your own deep conditioner that will leave your hair soft and shiny!

But before watching the video, be careful not to add every essential oil in your kitchen. Avoid the temptation to overdo it. Remember, less is more.

And if you must add a conditioner to your DIY deep conditioner, make sure to check the expiration date on the bottle and don't use a 10-year-old bottle of 6-in-1 reconstructor deep conditioner like your auntie did.

Over conditioning your hair can cause more harm than never conditioning your hair.
 

Photo by Brian To/WENN.com

Taraji P. Henson opened up about a musty odor emanating from her very first hairweave sew-in which she kept in for too long.

The 'Hidden Figures' star says she wore hairweave to protect her natural hair. But she left the extensions in too long (for months) and she was "embarrassed" when she had the extensions removed and released a strong musty odor that nearly knocked out her hairstylist!

Photo by Adriana M. Barraza / WENN.com

"The first time I went to get the weave taken out, it smelled like mildew. I was so embarrassed," she told ALLURE magazine.

The mother-of-one said she learned that day that she didn't do a good job washing her weave extensions, which allowed bacteria and fungus to grow under the extensions.

Photo by FayesVision/WENN.com

"I was washing my hair, but what I wasn't doing was drying the weft. When you have weave or an install, your hair is braided down and then sometimes they sew a [hair] net down on top of that and then they sew the hair tracks on top of that," she explained.

"So my dilemma was, how do I get to my scalp? How do I clean it? I didn't ever want that mildew smell again."

The 49-year-old actress now has a room full of custom weave pieces to choose from, but her first experience with mildew weave led her to develop her affordable TPH haircare line for women too busy to take out their weave for weeks.

Photo by Nikki Nelson / WENN

Taraji said she experimented with her own dry shampoo concoction to clean her scalp under the weave.

"The first thing I used was Sea Breeze [skin astringent]. I needed some relief! I found a little bottle, like the ones they put the dye in with the nozzle on top, and put the Sea Breeze in it. It helped, but it dries your hair out. It gets brittle.

Photo by MediaPunch / BACKGRID

"So I had to figure out how to get moisture down to my braids and clean my scalp. That's what the TPH haircare line is about. It's about scalp care -- and serving looks."

Taraji stressed that her haircare line is not just for "natural hair."

"I don't want people to think that this is a line that is just targeted at natural hair. This line is also for wigs. It's for installs, braids, locs, straight hair, curly hair [that] needs moisture."

Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

LeBron James suffered an embarrassing hairline mishap during Saturday night's game against the Utah Jazz. The 34-year-old Akron native typically wears a headband during games, but his headband slipped to reveal his Bigen hairline.

FYI for you women, Bigen, pronounced like "Beijing", is a magical concoction of chemicals that, when applied the correct way, makes hairlines and beards look fuller, thicker and blacker.

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Unfortunately for LeBron, his application of Bigen became diluted by his sweat, and when exposed by his errant headband, it became obvious to everyone sitting courtside that he was wearing a lacefront wig - not hair plug implants.

LeBron's teammate, Anthony Davis, alerted him that his headband was pushed back to reveal his Bigen hairline. Video shows Davis pointing to LeBron's head and shouting, "I'm talking about your hairline."

Watch the embarrassing video below, courtesy of Vladtv.com.
 

 

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Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Tracee Ellis Ross is launching a new haircare line for biracial and mixed race women who struggle to manage their loose curly hair.

Although mixed race women are envied for their so-called "good hair", most mixed race women say they struggle to maintain their frizzy curls that tangles easily.

Ross has the answer to their problem. The 'Black-ish' star said her new haircare line Pattern Beauty will "fulfill the unmet needs of our community".

Although the line is targeted toward the mixed race community, Black women with a tighter curl pattern than their mixed race sisters can also use Ross' products.

Nicky Nelson/WENN.com

The 46-year-old Scorpio announced her new line on Instagram.com on Tuesday, Sept. 3.

"@patternbeauty is here to empower," Ross wrote.

"@patternbeauty is for those of us who need more than a quarter size of product. large conditioner sizes that actually fulfill the unmet needs of our community. accessible pricing because everyone should have access to their most beautiful hair in their own shower, and gorgeous packaging that conjures the legacy of our history and makes us all feel like the royalty that we are."

Pattern Beauty products will include a shampoo, three targeted conditioners, a leave-in conditioner, two hair serums, a shower brush, a hair clip and a microfiber towel to enhance and nourish curls.

Ross said she spent two years working with chemists in order to select the seven initial formulas with safe ingredients.

MEGA via WENN.com

"I'm excited for PATTERN to join the natural hair movement, and to celebrate our hair for what it is: beautiful!" she said.

The products will go on sale Monday at patternbeauty.com and on Sept. 22 at Ulta stores. Prie range from $9 to $42.
 

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Thrilled to introduce PATTERN // my new hair care brand specifically for curly, coily, and tight textured hair.?? ?? @patternbeauty is the result of 20 years of dreaming, 10 years in the making (I wrote my first brand pitch in 2008, right when girlfriends finished ) and 2 years of working with chemists. I’m so excited to share this with y’all. ?? ?? @patternbeauty is here to empower and nourish curly, coily and tight-textured hair. 3b to 4c. The formulas are unique and packed with luscious & safe ingredients-trust me I know, because my panel and I tried 74 different samples to get these 7 formulas for phase one.?? ?? @patternbeauty is for those of us who need more than a quarter size of product. large conditioner sizes that actually fulfill the unmet needs of our community. accessible pricing because everyone should have access to their most beautiful hair in their own shower, and gorgeous packaging that conjures the legacy of our history and makes us all feel like the royalty that we are. ?? ?? I’m excited for PATTERN to join the natural hair movement, and to celebrate our hair for what it is: beautiful! The line will be available on patternbeauty.com this Monday, September 9 at 9am ET!!!! #RockYourPattern

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