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Dave Chappelle has agreed to sit down with transgender employees at Netflix who staged a walkout near the company's Los Angeles headquarters on Wednesday.

Chappelle, 48, came under fire for transgender jokes in his Netflix comedy special, The Closer.

He remained silent as LGBT+ activists on both sides protested and defended his comedy special.

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Dave now says he is willing to sit down at the table with Netflix employees who feel he caused harm to transgender people with his off-color jokes.

The comedian's rep tells TMZ that Dave is open to dialogue if Netflix employees reach out to him for a discussion.

Dave's camp says no one from Netflix has approached Chappelle or his team about setting up a meeting, which conflicts with what Netflix employees claim.

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Activist Ashlee Marie Preston (pictured) claims Chappelle rejected an invitation to meet with the transgender employees.

As TMZ reported, Preston invited Chappelle to come to the table to talk about the damage he's inflicted on the LGBTQ+ community, but "Dave chose not to show up."

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Dave's camp says he's open to dialogue with any group, as he points out in his Netflix special jokes.

Dave made the point in his special, that empathy should go both ways and that transgenders should stop "punching down" on his people.

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Ted Sarandos apologized for internal memos to his staff about Dave Chappelle ahead of a planned walkout by 1,000 Netflix employees on Wednesday, Oct. 20.

Sarandos previously insisted he wouldn't remove Chappelle's hit comedy special, The Closer, despite outrage from transgender employees over Chappelle's transgender jokes.

"I can tell you I screwed up those two communications, but my stance hasn't changed," the Netflix co-CEO said in a phone interview with The Hollywood Reporter.

Sarandos said he should have acknowledged that "a group of our employees were in pain" and "hurt" by the company's decision to air the special.

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"I'd say those emails lacked humanity, in which I like to and I do generally communicate with our teams," said Sarandos who is married to Nicole Avant, former U.S. Ambassador to the Bahamas.

"...this is the problem when you have a leaked email out of context, is it's part of a conversation already in progress, and that line of causing harm in the real world was way over simplistic and talking about something very specific that we were talking about earlier that day."

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Sarandos reiterated that Chappelle's comedy special - for which the comedian was paid $24.1 million - was in line with Netflix's stringent policy on harmful content.

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The Netflix chief (right) said he didn't think it would be "appropriate" for him to add a disclaimer about harmful content before airing Chappelle's special.

"The content is age restricted already for language, and Dave himself gives a very explicit warning at the beginning of the show, so I don't think it would be appropriate in this case."

He continued:

"But I do think that the inclusion of the special on Netflix is consistent with our comedy offering, it's consistent with Dave Chappelle's comedy brand and this is ... one of those times when there's something on Netflix that you're not going to like."

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A group of Netflix transgender employees plan to strike next week in protest of Dave Chappelle's "The Closer" comedy special.

Netflix has lifted the suspension of three employees, including a male-to-female transgender, who protested Chappelle's comedy special on social media.

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Netflix software engineer Terra Field, an MtF transgender, has been reinstated along with two other employees.

Prior to the suspension, Field wrote a lengthy Twitter thread on Oct. 9, complaining about Chappelle's Netflix special.

The three employees were suspended for crashing an annual directors meeting to complain about Chappelle at the company headquarters in San Francisco.

Netflix invites 500 top employees to the annual meeting, but Field and the other two workers were not invited.

Field tweeted the reinstatement notice on Tuesday.

"Our investigation did not find that you joined the QBR meeting with any ill intent and that you genuinely didn't think there was anything wrong with seeking access to this meeting."

Field added, "At the very least, I feel vindicated."

A transgender employee resource group at Netflix plans to walk off the job on October 20th to protest statements made by Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos regarding Chappelle.

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Sarandos, pictured with his wife Nicole Avant, denied suspending the three employees for complaining about Chappelle.

Sarandos added he will not pull Chappelle's comedy special off the air.

In an internal memo, the trans resource group ERG wrote:

"Trans Lives Matter. Trans Rights Matter. And as an organization, Netflix has continually failed to show deep care in our mission to Entertain the World by repeatedly releasing content that harms the Trans community and continually failing to create content that represents and uplifts Trans content. We can and must do better!"

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Flame Monroe rushed to defend fellow comedian Dave Chappelle following outrage over his Netflix comedy special, The Closer.

Flame -- a Black trans comic -- tells TMZ he's not in favor of taking Dave's new Netflix special off the air - because in the world of comedy, nothing is off-limits.

Dave cracking jokes over the LGBTQ+ community is fair game, says Flame, and should NOT be censored in the slightest.

"So as a comedian I believe that I don't want to be censored," Flame tells TMZ.

"I think that nothing is off limits and I think the social climate right now and the temperament started way back with Norman Lear, who had his finger on the pulse many years ago."

Flame went on to explain that Lear took risks with his television shows, such as Good Times and The Jeffersons, which tackled social issues such as racism and intolerance.

"The world has become too censored," said Flame.

"As a comedian, I don't want to be censored. As a trans woman, I want equality. And as a Black person, I want fair treatment in this country that we've been trying to get for 400 years."

Comedian Damon Wayans praised Chappelle for freeing comedian slaves who worried about being canceled.

Flame goes further by praising Chappelle as "great," while also saying he believes Chappelle has brought people together in a much needed way -- to create open dialogue.

Flame said, "I absolutely do not think the special should be taken off of Netflix... There is no topic that should be off limits."
 

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Netflix bosses are standing by comedian Dave Chappelle and his controversial new comedy special, "The Closer."

The streaming service defended its decision not to pull The Closer, and suspended an MtF trans employee who spoke out against it.

Co-CEO Ted Sarandos insisted he won't remove the hit comedy special, despite outrage from LGBT+ rights and transgender activists, who accused Chappelle of going too far.

A company source revealed that three Netflix employees have been suspended for crashing a quarterly directors meeting to complain, WENN.com reported.

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One of the suspended employees, Terra Field, a senior software engineer at Netflix, crashed a director-level meeting at the San Francisco headquarters to complain about The Closer.

Netflix invites 500 of its top employees to the annual meeting, however, Field's name was not on the invite list.

On Oct. 6, Field wrote a lengthy Twitter thread about The Closer and included transphobic tweets from other Twitter users.

Serandos told The Hollywood Reporter that Field and the other two employees were not suspended for speaking out on social media.

"It is absolutely untrue to say that we have suspended any employees for tweeting about this show. Our employees are encouraged to disagree openly and we support their right to do so."

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Sarandos defended Chappelle and his new special in an internal memo to Netflix staff and talent:

"Some talent may join third parties in asking us to remove the show in the coming days, which we are not going to do.

"Chappelle is one of the most popular stand-up comedians today, and we have a long standing deal with him... As with our other talent, we work hard to support their creative freedom - even though this means there will always be content on Netflix some people believe is harmful, like Cuties, 365 Days, 13 Reasons Why or My Unorthodox Life.

Serandos continued:

"Several of you have also asked where we draw the line on hate. We don't allow titles on Netflix that are designed to incite hate or violence, and we don't believe The Closer crosses that line. I recognize, however, that distinguishing between commentary and harm is hard, especially with stand-up comedy which exists to push boundaries. Some people find the art of stand-up to be mean-spirited but our members enjoy it, and it's an important part of our content offering."

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Fellow comedian Damon Wayans praised Chappelle for freeing comedian "slaves."

"The comedians. We were slaves to PC culture," Wayans told TMZ. "As an artist, he's Van Gogh with his ear off. He's trying to tell us, 'It's okay.'"

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Dave Chappelle is enjoying the controversy surrounding his latest Netflix special The Closer.

The comedian took the stage at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on Thursday night for a screening of his documentary and addressed multiple petitions for his show to be pulled from Netflix.

"If this is what being canceled is about, I love it," he joked. "I don't know what to tell you, except I'm a bad motherf**ker.

"This is the kindness conspiracy," he said, before insisting Americans "have to trust one another."

Chappelle also reportedly said "F*ck Twitter," prompting applause from the crowd.

The funnyman, continued his personal war on transgender men and women throughout The Closer.

Chappelle, 48, clarified that he's not saying "trans women" aren't women. "I'm just saying that [the genitalia] that they got..." is "not quite what it is - is it?"
 

 
Chappelle has upset officials at the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) and the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) once again with his remarks.

Amongst various comments, he sides with Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling, who became a target of activists last year after offering up her controversial views on transgender women.

Despite the backlash, Chappelle's new special has raced to the top five on Netflix's list of the most popular films and series on the platform in the U.S.

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Dave Chappelle's Netflix special The Closer has riled the LGBT+ community over his disarming jokes about transgender people "punching down" on the heteros.

NBJC's David Johns (below left) and LGBT+ activists are calling on Netflix to pull the special off the air.

Chappelle's 5th Netflix special in 5 years debuted on Tuesday - and has generated backlash over his perceived hatred for trans people.

"Gender is a fact," said Chappelle, who confused gender for biological sex.

"Every human being in this room, every human being on earth, had to pass through the legs of a woman to be on earth. That is a fact."

But critics pointed out that he dismissed C-sections, which make up about a third of all human births.

Chappelle, 48, also noted that "trans women's genitalia" is "not quite what it is."

LGBT+ activists went on the war path, calling for Netflix to pull Chappelle's special -- which Netflix declined to do the previous four times.

Chappelle defended embattled rapper DaBaby whose career is in ruins after his anti-LGBT+ comments at Rolling Loud in Miami.

Chappelle compared that incident to another involving DaBaby killing a man in self-defense in a Walmart in 2018.

"In our country, you can shoot and kill a ni**a, but you better not hurt a gay person's feelings," the comedian joked.

However, LGBT+ activists have had enough of Chappelle's jokes at their expense.

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David Johns, executive director of civil rights group the National Black Justice Coalition, asked Netflix to pull The Closer off the air.

"It is deeply disappointing that Netflix allowed Dave Chappelle's lazy and hostile transphobia and homophobia to air on its platform," Johns tells Deadline.com.

"With 2021 on track to be the deadliest year on record for transgender people in the United States — the majority of whom are Black transgender people — Netflix should know better. Perpetuating transphobia perpetuates violence.

Netflix should immediately pull The Closer from its platform and directly apologize to the transgender community."

The LGBT+ advocacy group GLAAD Agreed.

Officials at GLAAD retweeted a post from HolyBullies, which read:

"I would suggest, Mr. Chappelle, that before you start on another one of your stupid routines about #LGBTQ people... google some names - Bayard Rustin, Monica Roberts, Barbara Jordan, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey, Angela Davis, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde."

The tweet referred to late Black gay and transgender rights activists, lesbians, and bisexuals.

If LGBT+ activists had watched Chappelle's special to the end, they would have heard him mention his close friend Daphne Dorman, a transgender comedian.
 

 
Dorman, 44, committed suicide shortly after Chappelle dropped Dorman's name in his 2019 Netflix special Sticks and Stones.

Dorman had stuck up for Chappelle who routinely tested his transgender material on Dorman before going onstage.

"I don't know what the trans community did for her," Chappelle said, "but I don't care, because I feel like she wasn't their tribe. She was mine. She was a comedian in her soul."

Chappelle surprised the audience by declaring he was hitting pause on LGBT+ jokes until he could be sure he and the LGBT+ community were all laughing together.

He said:

"I'm telling you, it's done. I'm done talking about it. All I ask of your community, with all humility: Will you please stop punching down on my people?"

Despite the backlash, Chappelle's new special has raced to the top 5 on Netflix's list of the most popular films and series on the platform in the U.S.

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Chris Rock (with his pal Dave Chappelle) made a surprise appearance at a New York jazz club to joke about his battle with COVID (watch video below).

Chris announced he had a breakthrough case of the virus last month.

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Chris stepped out in public for the first time with his daughter on Oct. 2.

Then on Tuesday, he showed up and turned a Robert Glasper residency at the Blue Note Jazz Club into an impromptu comedy set with Chappelle.

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"Yes! I'm back from the dead! I had COVID. I had motherf**king COVID. Goddamnit," said Chris. "It wasn't quite as hard as being black, but it was close... That's why everyone's trying to avoid it man."

According to one attendee, even Glasper had no idea the two comedians would be there.

"They just showed up unannounced, and introduced [Glasper]," the insider told Page Six.

The star-studded crowd included actors Jeffrey Wright, Hill Harper and rapper Talib Kweli.

After the show, Rock and Chappelle met up with Kanye West, Busta Rhymes, and Saturday Night Live star Michael Che, to celebrate Kweli's birthday, as well as Dave's new Netflix special, according to Page Six.
 

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Dave Chappelle flipped out on a fan who approached his table at a hotel restaurant without a mask on.

Cellphone footage released by Dailymail.com shows the comedian, who requires masks at his comedy shows, chastising a female fan who approached him and a group of friends at the Four Seasons hotel in Austin, Texas.

Chappelle was in town doing "socially-distant" live shows on November 16, 17, and 18.

The video was taken by part-time actor Chad Laboy, who says a friend approached Chappelle without wearing a mask. Laboy stated, "My friend didn't have her mask on when she walked over to his table and rightly so, they chastised her for it."

He continued, "She apologized and offered to put her mask on, but continued to get berated. No one at their table was wearing a mask, but the group was extremely rude, saying things like, 'we don't know you', 'get the f**k away', and began calling her names."

Laboy pointed out that Chappelle and his crew weren't wearing masks either. Laboy added that Chappelle was trying to deescalate the situation, which was shown in the video, but he says that Chappelle's friends continued to be aggressive, including one man who shoved him and tried to snatch his phone.

Laboy says Chappelle and his group of friends later confronted them at their table and Chappelle told him, "You a bi**h a** n****a." The Austin PD arrived, and after hearing Laboy's side of the story, they gave them all a "trespass warning for a full year and we could not return to the hotel during that time or we would be arrested."
 

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Dave Chappelle has asked Netflix to pull his popular "Chapelle's Show" from its lineup, and the comedian told fans not watch his streaming shows on any platform until he is paid.

Chappelle slammed Netflix and ViacomCBS for licensing the Comedy Central hit without paying him.

Deadline.com confirmed the show's removal. Netflix licensed the show on a non-exclusive basis. The show also streams on HBO Max and ViacomCBS platforms like CBS All Access.

Deadline notes that companies license shows by paying the seller who, in turn, pays the artists.

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But Chappelle is still waiting for his checks. He posted a video on Instagram titled "Unforgiven" in which he companied that he was not paid by Netflix or ViacomCBS.