Prince Williams/Wireimage

Chicago-raised drill rapper G Herbo welcomed a newborn baby on the same day he pleaded "not guilty" to lying to federal agents about his identity theft case.

G Herbo and fiancee Taina Williams, 23, welcomed their first child together this week. The rapper posted a B&W Instagram photo that showed him holding his newborn to his tattooed chest.

The little baby's right hand is balled up in a fist.

Herbo also has a son named Yosohn with ex-fiancee Ariana Fletcher, 25.

Love & Hip Hop: New York star Emily Bustamante is a new grandmother at 40. Taina's stepfather is the rapper Fabolous, 43.

Herbo, 25, appeared in Springfield court via Zoom from his Los Angeles home where he entered his not guilty plea on Tuesday, May 25.

He allegedly told a federal agent he had no relationship with a defendant in the identity theft case.

Prosecutors say Herbo, real name Herbert Wright III does, in fact, know the other defendant, Chicago promoter Antonio Strong.

Strong reportedly gave Herbo "valuable goods," including "private jet charters, luxury accommodations, and exotic car rentals."

Prosecutors say Herbo "knowingly and willfully made the following materially false, fictitious and fraudulent statements and representations in a matter within the jurisdiction of the executive branch of the Government of the United States."

Lying to the feds is a serious federal charge punishable by prison time and a stiff fine. He is set to go to court on the original identity theft charges in August.

Congratulations to the apparently happy couple.
 

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GBI

The U.S. Justice Department announced federal hate crime charges against the Georgia men who shot "jogger" Ahmaud Arbery as he left a vacant house in their neighborhood.

Gregory McMichael told police Arbery attacked his son, Travis McMichael, before Travis shot and killed him on Feb. 23, 2020.

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Family handout

Arbery was killed after a witness spotted him leaving a vacant house that was under construction. Arbery's family said he was out jogging.

According to the indictment, the McMichaels "armed themselves with firearms, got into a truck and chased Arbery through the public streets of the neighborhood while yelling at Arbery, using their truck to cut off his route and threatening him with firearms."

A third man, William "Roddie" Bryan, followed 25-year-old Arbery in a pickup truck prior to the shooting. Bryan's cell phone recording was placed in evidence against the father and son.

Bryan was arrested in May 2020 by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and charged with felony murder after he told investigators he tried to help the men stop Arbery.

In Georgia a person can be charged with felony murder if they contributed to another's death.

All three men were indicted Wednesday on one count of interference with civil rights and attempted kidnapping. The McMichaels are also charged with using, carrying and brandishing a firearm during a crime of violence.

The three men have been jailed since their arrests. They are due back in court in May.

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A Washington D.C. pastor faces 20 years in prison for fraudulently obtaining $1.5 million from the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

Rudolph Brooks Jr. of Maryland deposited the funds into multiple bank accounts. The feds say he used part of the loan to purchase 39 vehicles including a 2018 Tesla Model 3.

The affidavit states warrants were issued to seize $2.2 million from Brooks' bank accounts.

Brooks, who is pastor at Kingdom Tabernacle of Restoration church in D.C., is owner of Cars Direct, a buy here, pay here auto lot.

According to the affidavit, Brooks allegedly submitted false tax returns with his application for a PPP loan on behalf of Cars Direct in the amount of $1,556,589.

The Cars Direct loan was approved on May 9, 2020 and funds were deposited into an account associated with Brooks.

Under the terms of the federal CARES Act, PPP funds must be deposited into a separate bank account created specifically for the funds so the IRS can keep track of expenditures.

Brooks, 45, is accused of making multiple cash transfers from the account into his personal bank accounts.

The affidavit states he used the money for "personal expenditures" including credit card bills, restaurant purchases, retail shopping, groceries, mortgage payments, and automotive auctioneers.

Additionally, the feds say Brooks used the funds to purchase 39 used luxury cars for his used car lot.

Brooks allegedly purchased a 2017 Mercedes Benz S Class, two 2017 Infinity Q50s, a 2015 Cadillac Escalade, a 2005 Bentley Continental, a 2018 Tesla Model 3, a 2014 GMC Yukon XL, among other luxury cars.

Thousands of people have been arrested for fraudulently obtaining loans.

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Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office

A Louisiana woman was arrested for refusing to return $1.2 million, mistakenly deposited into her brokerage account, Nola.com reported.

Kelyn Spadoni opened a Fidelity Brokerage Services account about a month before the firm installed "enhancement" software.

Schwab intended to transfer $82.56 into Spadoni's Fidelity account, but she received a jackpot of $1,205,619 instead.

Schwab immediately noticed the error and a request was made to retrieve the funds from Fidelity. But Fidelity sent Schwab a "CASH NOT AVAILABLE" notification, indicating that Spadoni had already withdrawn the cash.

When attempts to contact Spadoni failed, Schwab notified her employer at the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office. Spadoni worked there as a 911 dispatcher for four years.

Authorities discovered that Spadoni spent at least $48,000 on a 2021 Hyundai Genesis SUV. Investigators seized the vehicle and recovered about 75% of the stolen loot.

She was arrested and charged with theft valued over $25,000, bank fraud, and illegal transmission of monetary funds. Additionally, she was fired as a 911 dispatcher and is being held in jail on $50,000 bond.

Schwab has filed a lawsuit against Spadoni seeking the return of the remaining funds.

In the lawsuit, Schwab pointed out that Spadoni violated an agreement in the contract that states if a client receives an overpayment of funds, they are required to return the full amount.

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YouTube/Bravo

Jen Shah and her assistant Stuart Smith were arrested on federal fraud charges.

Shah and Smith are cast members on Bravo's "Real Housewives of Salt Lake City."

The reality TV personality is accused of running a nationwide telemarketing and money laundering scheme.

A 10-page indictment accuses Shah and Smith of defrauding victims older than age 55.

The victims were charged thousands of dollars to receive unspecified services which "provided little to no value to the victims."

Shah, 47, struggled to explain what she did for a living on a recent episode of Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen.

"My background is in direct response marketing for about twenty years," she said. "Our company does advertising. We have a platform that helps people acquire customers."

She claimed to be the founder and owner of JAX Fashion, Shah Beauty and The Real Shah Lashes. But prosecutors say Shah's businesses are nonexistent.

Shah appeared in federal court on Tuesday. She was released and ordered to turn over her passport.

She is not allowed to leave Utah without the judge's approval. Shah also is not allowed to participate in telemarketing schemes.

She is set to appear in a federal court in Manhattan via CCTV on Wednesday.

Shah is the wife of University of Utah football coach Sharrieff Shah. They share two grown sons together.
 

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LAPD

Sherhonda Gaulden clapped back at Wendy Williams for criticizing her son, NBA YoungBoy.

Sherhonda doesn't play about her children. The entrepreneur was a teenage mom when she gave birth to NBA YoungBoy, real name Kentrell Gaulden.

The 21-year-old father-of-7 was arrested by the LAPD after a brief foot chase on Monday in Los Angeles.

According to TMZ, the rapper was arrested on an outstanding warrant for firearms possession stemming from an arrest in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in September.

At issue were two weapons police found on YoungBoy at the time of his arrest last year. He is currently in FBI custody, pending possible RICO charges.

As part of her job as the reigning gossip queen of daytime talk TV, Wendy Williams spoke on YoungBoy's arrest during Tuesday's "Hot Topics" segment.

"He's got to go to jail," said Williams. "How do you do a hot pursuit? There are innocent people out here. You could've hurt innocent people in your hot pursuit and running through people's backyards. Nobody wants that – bringing down the property values.

"And, and how is it that you do what you do with seven kids at only 21-years-old? And I wonder what Yaya Mayweather's father, Floyd, is saying about this," she said, referring to YoungBoy's 7th baby mama, Yaya, who gave birth to his son, Kentrell Gaulden Jr., last year.
 

YoungBoy's mother was furious and she checked Wendy about her comments on her son.

"F**k Wendy Williams around here letting a half-dead 90-year-old white man suck her d*ck worried about my child stop tagging me in b***h."

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In a follow-up meme after Instagram removed her Wendy diss, she wrote: "They removed my post remove her show [sic]."

She captioned the crying laughing meme: "I'm sorry she not a man I lied she a woman I quit."
 

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Louis Vuitton US

A North Carolina woman allegedly went on a shopping spree with nearly $150,000 she illegally obtained from a coronavirus relief loan.

Federal prosecutors say Jasmine Johnnae Clifton, 24, spent most of the money on high end luxury bags and shoes at Louis Vuitton, Neiman Marcus and jewelry stores.

Clifton appeared in court on Monday and was later released on $25,000 bond, according to a press release from the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of North Carolina.

The press release detailed how Clifton lied on an application to fraudulently obtain relief funds for an existing business during the coronavirus lockdowns.

She falsely claimed $350,000 in gross revenue for her online clothing business, Jazzy Jas, despite filing paperwork in 2020 that shows the business was dissolved, according to ABC News.

The loan application was approved in early August for $149,900, which she later spent during shopping sprees at over two dozen retailers, including Ikea and Rooms to Go.

On Feb. 17, Clifton was indicted on wire fraud in relation to a disaster benefit and fraud in connection with major disaster or emergency benefits.

If convicted, she faces 30 years in prison on each charge, plus a possible $1,250,000 fine.

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A woman who believed she was communicating with pop singer Bruno Mars via text messages was scammed out $100,000 -- her entire savings.

The 63-year-old victim, a resident of Texas, believed she was "in love" with the 35-year-old singer.

The woman told police she assumed she was in contact with 11-time Grammy Award winner "Bruno Mars" after she received text messages showing Mars performing while he was on tour.

In September 2018, "Mars" asked the woman to send him a $10,000 check to help cover his touring expenses, and she agreed, according to authorities.

She went to a local branch of the Wells Fargo bank in North Richland Hills and withdrew a cashier's check made out to "Basil Chidiadi Amadi," a person described as a "friend of the band," according to authorities.

The woman deposited the check into an account at JPMorgan Chase bank.

Two days later, "Mars" contacted the woman again and asked for another $90,000, which she withdrew in a cashier's check that was made out to "Chi Autos" at the request of "Mars," according to TMZ.

The $90,000 check was deposited on September 14, 2018 into a separate bank account at JPMorgan Chase, according to investigators.

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TMZ

Investigators subpoenaed bank records and traced the two JPMorgan Chase accounts to Nigerian scammer Chinwendu Azuonwu, 39, and his co-conspirator Basil Amadi, 29, both residents of Houston.

Azuonwu, 39, appeared in court on Tuesday to face charges of impersonating Mars on Instagram to swindle the victim out of her life savings.

Azuonwu said he did not know how $90,000 was deposited into his account, according to the criminal complaint. He also denied knowing Amadi or the woman.

Azuonwu and Amadi are charged with third-degree felony money laundering, KPRC-TV reported. Azuonwu's bail was set at $30,000.

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Instagram

U.S. defense lawyers representing Nigerian scammer Ramon Abbas, aka Hushpuppi, applied to withdraw from his case.

Gal Pissetzky and Vicki Podberesky said Abbas stopped communicating with them after he retained a new attorney to represent him.

The attorneys announced their decision after months of negotiations with the federal government, according to Premium Times.

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Instagram

Abbas, 37, was arrested in June in Dubai and extradited to Chicago to face money laundering and wire fraud charges.

Video shows a stunned Abbas being taken from his luxury apartment in Dubai by special operations forces and Emerati police officers in June.

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Instagram

His lawyers told a judge that Abbas is the father of five children, including a child who lives with his mother in Virginia. But the judge ordered Abbas detained until his trial, and said Abbas would not be allowed to stay with a girlfriend's uncle in Homewood, Illinois, because he is a flight risk.

The federal prosecutor said Abbas "never visited" the girlfriend or their child in the United States and there is no evidence that he has ever even met this 'uncle.’
 

Abbas' lawyer said his client is a social media influencer who earned his millions legally by promoting high end luxury brands like Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Fendi on Instagram.

After his arraignment in Chicago, Abbas was transferred to Los Angeles, California where his trial is set to begin in May 2021.

According to an affidavit obtained by Premium Times, Abbas and his co-conspirators stole hundreds of millions of dollars from 1.9 million victims around the world.
 

Abbas, pictured above in his $10,000-a-month apartment at the Palazzo Versace in Dubai, also convinced hundreds of social media users around the world to set up bank accounts to launder that money.

He used the money to finance his extravagant lifestyle which he flaunted on Instagram.com.

Authorities seized his fleet of cars including a Ferrari, Rolls-Royce Phantom and a Lamborghini. He rocked $150,000 diamond-studded wristwatches and he purchased a Rolls-Royce SUV just to ferry his luggage to the airport.

Abbas regularly mocked his 2.5 million followers, telling them to get their money up and referring to them as "peasants."
 

Abbas and his crew swindled victims by sending emails that appeared to come from law firms.

"Shark Tank" star Barbara Corcoran was duped into sending $400,000 cash via a wire transfer after receiving a phishing email that she mistakenly believed was an invoice for a real estate transaction.

According to a Secret Service agent who investigates Nigerian email crimes, victims are tricked into sending money to bank accounts that the criminals control.

"These crimes are heartbreaking," Brian Krebs, the editor of KrebsOnSecurity.com, told The New York Post. "Victims send payments to the wrong place and, nine times out of ten, the money is gone."

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A former U.S. postal service employee plead guilty to stealing gift cards and cash from U.S. mail letters.

Markeyta McAllister, 30, pleaded guilty on Dec. 17 to Obstruction of United States Mail for stealing thousands of dollars in cash and gift cards between July 7, 2014 to December 3, 2019.

"While most U.S. Postal Service employees serve Americans with integrity and honesty – McAllister did not," said U.S. Attorney Byung J. 'BJay' Pak. "By opening peoples' mail to steal money and gift cards, McAllister betrayed both the citizens she supposedly served and the reputation of her fellow employees."

Pak says McAllister, of Jefferson, Georgia, opened mailed letters to steal prepaid Visa gift cards and cash from letters addressed to residents in Duluth, Georgia, where she worked at a U.S. mail facility.

McAllister later used the stolen gift cards at stores such as Kroger and Walmart.

After pleading guilty, McAllister confirmed that she "fully underst[ood] that it is a crime, punishable by fine or imprisonment, or both, to knowingly or willfully obstruct or delay the mail, or to steal or attempt to steal mail of any kind."