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When the comedy film "Coming To America" premiered in theaters in 1988, Black women everywhere expressed their dismay that Eddie Murphy's character, Prince Akeem had colorism issues.

At issue was Vanessa Bell Calloway's character, Imani, who was groomed by her father to be Akeem's obedient and subservient wife.

On the day they were to be married, Akeem ordered her to "bark like a dog" and "hop on one leg" in a humiliating and degrading manner.

Akeem and his loyal man servant traveled to New York to pick his queen, Lisa, an arrogant and self-entitled light skinned woman, not a dark-skinned, regal, beautiful African woman like his mother, the Queen.

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In an interview with Page Six, Calloway confirmed suspicions that colorism issues played a role in her casting as Murphy's queen-to-be.

"When you have white people hiring Black people in movies, sometimes a certain look is wanted," said Calloway, who added that Murphy and the other executives "wanted a light-skinned girl" to play Lisa.

"I just wasn't light enough. Even though Eddie had the final say on who played Lisa."

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Murphy chose Shari Headley to play the part of Lisa McDowell.

"That's something that we've always dealt with within our race: A lot of men were indoctrinated by having a white woman or light-skinned woman on their arm," Calloway said. "I didn't want the part of Imani, I wanted to be Lisa -- I had read the script and I wanted the bigger role."

Black female moviegoers shared her frustration. They wrote letters to Murphy, the movie production company, and Ebony and Jet magazines, voicing their outrage over the optics of a stunningly beautiful African woman barking like a dog onscreen. While Lisa received $500,000 diamond and ruby earrings.

Calloway ultimately accepted the part despite her disappointment.

"The real deal is, when you're in a situation like that, you wanna be a part of an Eddie Murphy movie. I wasn't gonna say no! I would've loved to have had the lead part, but I was very happy to be in the movie. I can't lie about that. I said, 'I'll make the best out of this and I'll be the best.' It was a smaller role but it was a glamorous part to play. And Shari did a great job."
 

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Meagan Good is still going with the excuse that she mistakenly bleached her skin 5 shades lighter.

Back in May, a fan remarked on Meagan's skin bleaching, writing: "Meagan looked better dark skin... She not so pretty anymore she looks average... But her dark skin was above average... Why did she Bleach."

The 38-year-old actress responded: "I didn't Queen. A (unbeknownst to me) unlicensed aesthetician gave me a product to correct a sun mark on my forehead that messed up [my] skin."

In a recent interview with faith-based, The Same Room, Meagan said, "I went to an unlicensed esthetician who convinced me that I needed to get rid of some sun damage. And a few months later, I am like five shades lighter than I actually am and it was a really traumatic experience because I really trusted the person."

Meagan claimed not to know her skin was getting lighter and lighter over time. And her husband didn't notice either.

"I kept asking her through the process, like 'Is this what's supposed to happen?' She's like, 'Oh it'll lift and it'll come back.' I got to the place of realizing I don't know if it's going to come back, I think I've been bamboozled."

When her followers started clowning her and bloggers posted before and after photos, Meagan began to feel the sting of shame.

"It was super embarrassing and super painful especially in the climate we're in as black women," she said.

"I'm over-confident when I look in the mirror, I like what I see. And to feel like someone stole that from me and to feel like I was misled and now there's commentary on it and people thinking I don't love myself, that's something I can get through but when I'm thinking about these young girls, these young brown-skinned girls who are thinking that I've changed myself and what kind of ideas are putting into their head, that just broke my heart."

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Lizzo is just like you. The "Juice" singer admits she is still struggling with body image issues and negative thoughts. She's in a depressing head space so close to Christmas.

Speaking in a video to fans on TikTok, she said:

"I came home, and I took my clothes off to take a shower, and I just started having all of these really negative thoughts about myself. Like, you know, 'What's wrong with me?' 'Maybe everything, all the mean things people say about me are true.' And, you know, 'Why am I so disgusting?' and hating my body. I'd normally have some positive thing to say to get out of this (but I didn't this time). And that's OK, too. I think these are normal. They happen to everybody. They happen to the best of us. We are the best of us. I can only hope that it changes for the better. But I know I'm beautiful. I just don't feel it. But I know I'm going to get through it."

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Meanwhile, Lizzo previously admitted fame "puts a magnifying glass" on her negative thoughts.

She shared:

"You can be the coolest, most richest person ever and it doesn't buy you f**king happiness. Money doesn't buy you happiness. Fame only puts a magnifying glass on the s**t that you already have. And if that s**t is f**ked up, you're just going to have even more magnified f**ked up s**t in situations where it doesn’t even seem valid or like you're even like supposed to feel that way and so it f**ks you up even more because you feel super f**king ungrateful."

Fans pleaded with Lizzo to seek help. The holidays can be the most depressing time of the year for many Americans.

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Lupita Nyong'o believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

The 36-year-old Pisces was born in Mexico but raised in Kenya, which gave her a different perspective on race and racism in Black America.

She tells BBC Newsnight that she still experienced "colorism" prejudice due to having darker skin. But it was only after she arrived in the U.S. that she saw how people were divided by race.

"Race is a very social construct, one that I didn't have to ascribe to on a daily basis growing up," she says. "As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black."

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She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

Lupita says she was once told she was "too dark" to appear on TV, and that she was not as pretty as her sister, who had lighter skin.

"I definitely grew up feeling uncomfortable with my skin color because I felt like the world around me awarded lighter skin," the Black Panther star explains.

As a result, she believes Americans favor lighter skin even among those who are Black.

"We still ascribe to these notions of Eurocentric standards of beauty, that then effect how we see ourselves among ourselves," she adds.

Spice

Jamaican dancehall star Spice angered her social media followers by continuing to wear light makeup and live life as a LSLH (light-skinned, long hair) woman. The reality TV star called out the hypocrisy of dark skinned people bleaching their skin in her new music video "Black Hypocrisy".

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