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Former Chicago Bulls player Horace Grant says the recent ESPN documentary about Bulls legend Michael Jordan was "90 percent bullsh*t."

Grant says criticism of Jordan was "edited out" of the final cut the "so-called documentary" titled Michael Jordan: The Last Dance.

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Grant (pictured center) won three NBA championships with Jordan (holding trophy) before joining the Orlando Magic. He said the documentary painted Jordan in a better light than reality.

"I would say [the documentary was] BS in terms of the realness of it," Grant told ESPN 1000's Kap podcast.

"It wasn't real -- because a lot of things [Jordan] said to some of his teammates, that his teammates went back at him. But all of that was kind of edited out of the documentary, if you want to call it a documentary."

The NBA allowed Jordan to "retire" gracefully following the 1992–93 season after it was reported that Jordan had a gambling problem and bet on his own team.
 

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Michael Jordan weighed in on the controversy surrounding the Los Angeles Clippers decision to rest star Kawhi Leonard for certain games in a NBA trend called "load management".

The NBA season is still young, and Leonard has missed 6 or 7 games to decrease risk of injuries. But Clippers fans feel cheated and are yelling foul.

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Well-respected sports announcer and NBA analyst Doris Burke criticized Leonard for sitting out a recent game against the Milwaukee Bucks and the league MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo at the Staples Center.

"It is mind-boggling to me that Kawhi doesn't want to play against the reigning MVP and he'd rather play against Portland tomorrow night on TNT," Burke said. "Kawhi not playing is ridiculous at this point."

Leonard seems unfazed by the criticism. But when Michael Jordan speaks, everyone listens.

The NBA legend and owner of the Charlotte Hornets is making sure his own players don't get the wrong idea about the work ethic that is expected of them.

According to Steve Clifford, current Orlando Magic coach and former head coach of the Hornets, Jordan addressed the issue of load management in team meetings.

"Being with Michael in Charlotte, Michael used to tell them every year, you're paid to play 82 games."

Clifford added that lazy players stood out from the rest: "I've been doing this for 20 years, and playing 82 games used to be a badge of courage for a lot of guys. There were always a lot of guys who didn't want to play. They stood out more."

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NBA legend Michael Jordan opened a medical clinic to serve the disadvantaged in his native North Carolina.

According to the Charlotte Observer, the 6-time NBA champion teared up on Thursday as he unveiled the Novant Health Michael Jordan Family Medical Clinic which has already treated 300 patients.

During his speech the Charlotte Hornets owner fought back tears as he dedicated the clinic to the community that supported him.

"I've gone off and made my life in Illinois and other places, but I know where it all begins. And I don't need my mother to constantly remind me about that," Jordan said as the crowd laughed.

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"I can only give in gratitude for what I can never repay. I stand here before you as a proud parent, son, obviously a member of this community. My mother, my brothers, my daughter, my grandson, we all represent the name 'Michael Jordan,'" the NBA Hall-of-Famer said. "As you can see, it's a very emotional thing for me. To be able to give back to a community that's supported me over the years."

The clinic was funded by a $7 million philanthropic donation from Jordan.

Jordan's goal is to bring more medical clinics to disadvantaged neighborhoods in North Carolina.

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Jordan, 56, and his second wife, Yvette Prieto share twin daughters, Victoria and Ysabel.

He also has three grown children, sons Jeffrey and Marcus, and a daughter, Jasmine, by his first wife, Juanita Vanoy.

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