Robin Gentry / EyeEm

Center for Disease Control Director Robert Redfield says suicides and drug overdoses have surpassed the death rate for COVID-19 among young people in America.

Redfield said lockdowns and lack of public schooling negatively impacts mental health among young people.

"We're seeing, sadly, far greater suicides now than we are deaths from COVID," Redfield testified in a Buck Institute Webinar. "We're seeing far greater deaths from drug overdose that are above excess that we had as background than we are seeing the deaths from COVID."

About 146,000 people have died from COVID or COVID-related causes, according to CDC data.

Federal data recorded 48,000 deaths from suicide and at least 71,000 deaths from drug overdoses in 2018.

The Chicago Sun-Times reviewed specifically black populations. In Cook County, Illinois, the number of suicide deaths among Black people is already higher than for all of 2019.

According to the American Medical Association, there has been a 40% increase in suicides and drug overdoses in Colorado in 2020. The number of calls to suicide hotlines have increased 48 percent.

Between March 15 and April 29, as many people committed suicide in Queens, New York than did between January 1 and April 29 the year prior.

Hopelessness and despair amid job uncertainty and the ongoing lockdowns have impacted mental health among children, teenagers and young adults in this country.

stefanamer via Getty Images

The CDC has pushed for children to return to schools and adults to return to work as the deaths from COVID-19 have reached a new low.

Just 300+ people died from COVID in the U.S. last week, according to the CDC.

Redfield said he's "absolutely comfortable" with his grandchildren returning to school in the fall.

40 million jobs have been lost to the economic shutdown caused by the pandemic, compared to 2.6 million jobs lost in all of 2008 when the SARS/H1N1 virus arrived in the U.S.

Prince Williams/Wireimage

Rapper Future Hendrix knows the importance of a good education. The "Mask Off" rapper is giving scholarships to new college students in Georgia amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The father-of-6 invited high school graduates to apply for the "I'm Still a Dreamer" Georgia COVID-19 Scholarship, funded through his FreeWishes Foundation, by submitting videos detailing how the global health crisis has personally affected their lives.

"You don't have to be in the perfect situation or come from the perfect background to reach for your dreams," Future shared in a statement. "Despite this COVID-19 pandemic, I encourage all dreamers to continue to dream big."

Applicants must meet certain criteria to be eligible for the grants, which are capped at $2,500. Submissions will be accepted until July 27. The lucky recipients will be announced on 4 August.

For more information visit freewishes.org/2020-scholarship-info.

No photo

Getty Images, Twitter.com

Teachers are being encouraged to use a "Gender Snowperson" graphic to teach students about gender identity in sex education classes.

The gender snowperson image was tweeted by Teacher2Teacher, a left leaning nonprofit organization that provides lesson plans and other resources to teachers.

Teacher2Teacher is sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The organization identified Johnny Cole, a "diversity officer" for the Lexington School District, as the source of the image.

The image shows a genderless snowman on a board accompanied by stickers that explains the gender identity ideology. One sticker says:

"Gender Identity
Girl, Boy, Neither
Who you are and how you feel as a person."

Another sticker reads:

"Sexual orientation
Who you love or are attracted to".

A third sticker says:

Sex Assigned at Birth
Girl, Boy, Intersex
Pronoun assigned at birth".

Twitter users were confused and baffled by the agenda behind the lesson.

"What is the target age for this lesson?" asked one Twitter user.

"This is just awful. This is not something prepubescent children should have to deal with," wrote another user.

A third user tweeted: "Why is the snowman white?".
 

JIM YOUNG/AFP/Getty Images

Michelle Obama shared a childhood photo from her school yearbook to mark the Day of Charity on Thursday Sept. 5.

The back-to-school photo shows 10-year-old Michelle displaying a toothy grin and bangs over her forehead.

In the photo caption on Instagram.com, Michelle said every girl deserves a good education and the same opportunities she's had.

"It's so easy for us to take our education for granted, especially here in the United States. Right now, more than 98 million adolescent girls around the world are not in school," she wrote.

"I learned a lot in school," she continued, "how to do my multiplication tables and structure a paragraph, yes, but also how to push myself, be a good friend, and dust myself off after a failure."

JIM YOUNG/AFP/Getty Images

She added, "I believe every girl on the planet deserves the same kind of opportunities that I’ve had ... Girls who go to school have healthier children, higher salaries, lower poverty rates, and they can even help boost their entire nation's economy.

"The future of our world is only as bright as our girls," she wrote.

Michelle, 55, shares two grown daughters with former President Barack Obama, 58.
 

View this post on Instagram

It’s after Labor Day, so I’m thinking about all the young people heading back to school and reflecting on my own days as a student in Chicago. I learned a lot in school—how to do my multiplication tables and structure a paragraph, yes, but also how to push myself, be a good friend, and dust myself off after a failure. It’s so easy for us to take our education for granted, especially here in the United States. Right now, more than 98 million adolescent girls around the world are not in school. I believe every girl on the planet deserves the same kind of opportunities that I’ve had—a chance to fulfill her potential and pursue her dreams. We know that when we give girls a chance to learn, they’ll seize it. And when they do, our whole world benefits. Girls who go to school have healthier children, higher salaries, lower poverty rates, and they can even help boost their entire nation’s economy. So today on #WorldCharityDay, I want you to share your favorite #BackToSchool photo and to join the @girlsopportunityalliance to take action for global girls’ education. Visit the link in my bio to learn more—because the future of our world is only as bright as our girls.

A post shared by Michelle Obama (@michelleobama) on