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Photo by WENN/Avalon

Former President Barack Obama spoke out about the death of George Floyd, the Black Minneapolis man who died after a white officer knelt on his neck during an arrest on Monday.

In an open letter shared on Twitter Friday morning, the former president spoke of the frustrations expressed in conversations he had about Floyd's death.

He noted that incidents of police brutality cannot be allowed to be regarded as a normal part of daily life.

"This shouldn't be 'normal' in 2020 America. It can't be 'normal.' If we want our children to grow up in a nation that lives up to its highest ideals, we can and must do better."

Obama, who is biracial, said the country must commit to improved racial relations.

Photo by Johnny Nunez/WireImage

Rapper Jim Jones argues that being a rapper today is more dangerous than being a soldier in Iraq.

Most rap enthusiasts agree that rap music went 10 toes up a long time ago. But Jones's analogy between a rapper and a soldier at war didn't sit well with on Iraq war veteran.

"Heard the comments you made about 'being a rapper is harder than fighting a war in Iraq...' You allowed to have your opinion without any facts nor truth to it, but as a Vet and hip hop fan, I found it extremely disrespectful and ignorant," the vet wrote on Instagram.

The vet, who goes by the username @mramcore, said his unit fought in Iraq in 2004 and lost more Marines in two months than 'rappers' in the past three years.

He added: "Keep talking but there is no comparison!"
 

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Screen grab: Instagram.com@deoncole

Comedian Deon Cole addressed the controversy surrounding the effeminate crushed velvet pantsuit he wore to the 51st Annual NAACP Awards.

The 48-year-old actor reminded his followers that he is a comedian who routinely wears outlandish attire on red carpets.

Photo by Tommaso Boddi/FilmMagic

"First of all let me say this: any events I've been to I have a track record... on every red carpet, I've always worn something super live, super dope."

He added: "I done been on some of the best dressed lists, by taking chances, as well as I've been on some of the worst dressed lists... but I've always had the balls to wear what I wanted to wear."

Cole said he respected his followers' opinions, but he is "tripping on the hate. The hate that I have been receiving is just unreal."

"I have super tough skin," he said. "But the hatred that you all spew is like crazy to me. And it's always against our own kind."

Cole urged his critics to redirect their anger into something more productive.

"It's about balance, y'all. You can be mad at me about my pants, but use that same anger when it comes to injustice."
 

Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Rickey Smiley is taking back that meme he re-posted about society punishing Black boys for wearing dreadlocks while praising Black boys for wearing dresses.

In a meme posted on his Instagram page, the comedian wrote:

Black boy: I want to wear locks to school
Society: Suspended!!! No graduation THUG!!!
Black boy: How about a dress?

The meme concludes with the hashtag "#SocialEngineering."

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Smiley was alluding to the recent controversy surrounding Deandre Arnold, the 16-year-old boy who was banned from attending his prom until he cut off his dreadlocks.

The popular host of the syndicated Rickey Smiley Morning Show appears to have caved to the pressure after trans groups and their heterosexual allies contacted his radio advertisers.

In a rambling video on YouTube.com, Rickey addressed the controversy, saying he didn't actually create the meme, he simply re-posted it.

After complaining about the cancel culture coming for him, and saying he shouldn't have to apologize for expressing his opinions in a free country, Rickey concluded by apologizing to anyone he offended.

So far, rappers Young Thug and Lil Boosie have no plans to apologize for expressing similar opinions about Dwyane Wade's son, Zaya Wade.
 

 

This is an open post where you can discuss any subject matter. This post will not be censored or moderated. Disqus may automatically moderate certain words considered offensive. There are no rules in Open Posts. So enter at your own risk.

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Photos: Getty Images

Rickey Smiley tackled the issue of society emasculating Black boys while penalizing Black boys for wearing their hair in dreadlocks.

In a meme posted on his Instagram page, the comedian wrote:

Black boy: I want to wear locks to school
Society: Suspended!!! No graduation THUG!!!
Black boy: How about a dress?

The meme concludes with the hashtag "#SocialEngineering."

Photo may have been deleted

Smiley was alluding to the recent controversy surrounding Deandre Arnold, the 16-year-old boy who was banned from attending his prom until he cut off his dreadlocks.

The popular host of the syndicated Rickey Smiley Morning Show didn't caption his meme, but some of his followers called him out on wearing a dress during his comedy skits.

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Screen grab: YouTube.com

One IG follower wrote: "But Rickey didn't you wear a dress on multiple occasions?? i.e sister Bernice?? So I'm kinda lost."

Another wrote: "Black people are judging a black boy wearing a dress and whites are judging both. It's bad all the way around."

And a third wrote: "Every generation has its attack on minority masculinity. Birth of a nation. Civil rights, the project mentality of the 70s, the drugs in the 80s, gangs in the 90s. We didn't want our men violent. More drugs and the glamorization of self destruction of the 2000s now this."

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Thinx - YouTube.com

A television commercial is causing mass confusion among young people who apparently missed or misunderstood the ad's tagline at the end.

The commercial opens with a pre-teen boy telling his father, "I think I got my period." The next scene shows a man rolling over in bed to reveal a bloodstain on the sheet under him.

The commercial also shows men dealing with their periods in public restrooms and locker rooms. One man asks another man for a Tampon, and a high school boy nervously drops his pantyliners in front of a girl, who asks him if he needs her help.

The commercial caused confusion among young people on social media who questioned how boys and men can menstruate.

Many missed the ad's tagline at the end of the commercial - 'If we all had them, maybe we'd be more comfortable with them.'

But even those who read the tagline were baffled. Since when are we women ashamed of having periods?

Some viewers believe the people behind the commercial are men who assume women are ashamed of having periods.

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Thinx - YouTube.com

Thinx claims to make underwear that absorbs your period.

"We're on a mission to empower every body [sic] with innovative solutions and social change," the company states.

The company's Twitter page promotes their undergarments under the hashtag #IfWeAllHadPeriods.

One YouTube viewer wrote: "I think [the ad is] mostly trying to deconstruct the 'stigma' about periods. I'd personally never heard of period shaming, but apparently some people think its a thing."
 

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This news might be unsettling for some of you. Visitors to Disqus-enabled blogs may have noticed a few changes on Thursday, Oct. 3.

The most significant changes are Disqus brings back down voting, and the comments counts have vanished on most blogs, including Sandrarose.com.

Additionally, most Disqus users report the total upvotes and comments totals on their profiles are gone.

Understandably Disqus users and blog publishers are irate over the changes, particularly blog visitors who believe down votes encourages online bullying.

Disqus has been working for the past 24 hours to fix the bug that crashed the comments counter, as well as restoring the cumulative upvote totals.

The loss of comments counts and upvotes may be due to a bug, but the downvotes are here to stay according to a post on Disqus.com.

In a blog post dated Oct. 2, Disqus writes:

"Previously, we hid how many downvotes a comment received and only displayed the total upvotes, but we believe that liking and disliking something is a big part of how we engage with content and communicate with each other."

Disqus explained that the goal in bringing back down votes is to encourage more dialogue "between people with different opinions to have more constructive interactions."

Some Disqus users are pulling out their hair over the concept of receiving even a single down vote.

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Twitter.com

Another Disqus user wrote:

"If you're going to downvote, STAND BY IT. If you show names by upvotes, show names by downvotes. Otherwise, you're just enabling the trolls."

Question: Why do you down vote?

  • The comment does not contribute to the discussion
  • You disagree with the comment
  • You don’t like the user
  • You think the comment should appear lower in the discussion thread
  • Will you comment less if you receive down votes?

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